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As climate change disrupts the annual monsoon, India must prepare (Commentary)

first_imgOver the past few decades, India’s total annual rainfall averages haven’t changed but the intensity of precipitation has increased as extreme weather events (EWEs) become more frequent and widespread. Today, the country witnesses more episodes of extremely heavy rainfall, as compared to the past’s consistent, well spread out seasonal rains.The nation’s meteorological department already admits that this is a clear impact of climate change. These intense storms pose a huge danger to India’s agriculture-based economy and to millions of farmers whose livelihoods still largely rely upon a consistent rainfall season. There are also periods of droughts interspersed with floods.The good news is that Indian authorities are aware of the change and are trying to tackle the impacts of shifting rainfall patterns and adapt to them.These extreme weather events are of global significance since more than 1.8 billion people live on the Indian subcontinent, and the impact in the South Asian region has economic fallout in other parts of the world. This post is a commentary. Views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. A house lies submerged in the flood-affected part of Kodagu in Karnataka, India. Image by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.From the time settled agriculture started on the Indian subcontinent millennia ago, farmers have been able to largely depend on the calendrical reliability of the monsoon rains to sustain crops. Every year, winds from the southwest picked up moisture from the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal, and delivered it as soaking rain over the land, spread out between June and September. Then, between October and December, the same winds returned from the northeast, carrying moisture to the eastern coastline.However, this consistent seasonal cycle has been disturbed in recent years, and has become a cause of great concern not only for India, but also other countries of the subcontinent, where 1.8 billion people live. The director-general of the India Meteorological Department has confirmed to Mongabay-India that the seasonal reliability of the annual monsoons has been changing. What used to be a steady combination of rains and sun is giving way to long periods of inadequate rainfall followed by intense rain; in short — drought and floods.For instance in 2019, in the state of Kerala, at the southwestern tip of the Indian peninsula, June and July were months of inadequate rains, followed by a burst of intense storms in early August, causing floods and landslides in northern districts. The Kodagu and Chikkamaguluru districts in Karnataka state, northeast of Kerala, saw the same pattern. Avalanche, a river valley in the Nilgiris Mountains of Tamil Nadu state, to the east, received more than 900 millimeters (35 inches) of rain in just one day.Mumbai, India’s commercial capital city, was flooded for weeks this year and saw bouts of intense rain following each other in quick succession. Eastward flowing rivers originating in the Western Ghats have seen increased flow and the western districts of Maharashtra, including Satara, Kolhapur and Sangli, have faced heavy floods and destruction. Northwards in Gujarat state, it was Vadodara and surrounding regions that endured the brunt of the deluge. To the north and northeast, there were floods in Himachal Pradesh, while parts of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, and Assam states were also under water.Juxtaposed to all this, the reservoirs supplying drinking water to the southern city of Chennai ran dry this summer. Chennai had devastating floods in December 2015, and since then has not received sufficient rains in subsequent monsoons.While extreme weather is not new to the monsoon, the recurring fierce intensity of these widespread storms is novel. In recent years, extreme weather events (EWEs) have become more frequent, intense and widespread.For example, when Kerala flooded in August 2018, the rains led to a domino effect of disastrous impacts. Kerala’s people were taken by surprise last year, since the previous such event happened in 1924, nearly a century ago. But similar intense rains fell in August 2019 – just a year later. Kerala was spared the devastation of 2018 this time only because the brutal rain did not happen all over the state, and the monsoon had been deficient before the EWE.A massive rain-induced landslide in Kerala that resulted in multiple fatalities. Image by Jinu S. Raj.The monsoons drive the Indian economyThe newly erratic monsoons are having a serious impact on the Indian economy, especially at this time with the nation in an all-round economic slowdown. Currently, the contribution of agriculture to India’s total GDP is only 16 percent, having been reduced over recent decades, but farming still employs nearly half of the country’s population, so a bad monsoon has a multiplier effect that cuts across all other sectors.In fact, India’s business calendar begins with the southwest monsoon, as the festival season starts after the first harvest that these rains bring. As in ages past, if you have good, helpful rains, then a bountiful harvest is almost assured, which reflects in the joyousness of the annual festival, be it Diwali or Onam. But if there is drought or floods, then a pall is drawn over the festivities, and with it bad economic spill-over into the following months.A good harvest drives domestic consumption, that gives buoyancy to the festivals and impetus to the economy. People buy clothes, goods, tractors, motorcycles and cars during such periods. A bad harvest dulls this impetus, oftentimes leading into a downward economic spiral.The impact is worse when EWEs cause destruction of public and private property and assets, striking different parts of the country near-simultaneously. And of course, EWEs, bringing bad harvests, mean more human mortality and morbidity. Farmers, businesses and enterprises of all kinds find it difficult to recover after the severe economic shock brought by an EWE.Animals swim through floodwaters in an attempt to reach safer grounds during the floods in Assam. Image by the International Fund for Animal Welfare/Wildlife Trust of India.The Post Disaster Needs Assessment Report produced by the United Nations and Kerala government estimated the state’s economic loss after the August 2018 floods at rupees 310 billion (US$ 4.4 billion). This was a heavy blow for a small state with a meager tax base. Then came the floods of 2019 bringing more ruin, even before the earlier damage was repaired and people rehabilitated.The impact of an erratic monsoon on agriculture is direct. Between 50 to 60 percent of Indian agriculture is still rainfed, without access to any form of irrigation. This makes farmers vulnerable to any change in monsoonal patterns; they rely on the rainfall’s arrival date, its even spread and consistent quantity. If it is late, seeds fail to sprout and young shoots wither; if the rains come in excess, then the plants drown. By the time the soil dries out, the rains may end, exposing the crops to end-of-season drought.Add to this the problem of the use of hybrid seeds and improved varieties tailored to produce maximum yield for a specific rainfall pattern. When the rainfall pattern changes — as is happening more frequently now — the plants deliver inadequately.Traumatized over multiple crop failures, farmers and farm labor migrate to other parts of the country to pick up other jobs or work as construction labor. Then, when an EWE strikes their new destination, they return home doubly-traumatized. Some farmers, who opt not to leave their farms even after repeated crop failures and debts, end their lives in frustration at their own hand.A coffee estate submerged in the floodwaters of the Kaveri river in Kodagu district. A preliminary survey by authorities revealed that more than 102,034 hectares (252,131 acres) of coffee plantation were damaged. Photo by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.Is India prepared?Importantly, India is aware of the EWE issue at the national policy level, and so is working to adapt. The national Economic Survey 2017-18 had a whole chapter dedicated to the impact of climate change on Indian agriculture. The survey is the document that the Union Government prepares and publishes a day before the Union Budget is presented in the parliament, and it summarizes the economic outlook for the present and future.Using the India Meteorological Department data, the survey is detailed. It has noted the increases in average annual temperature between 1975 and 2015, and changes in average annual rainfall in the same period. The number of dry days (rainfall less than 1 millimeter in a day) and wet days (rainfall more than 80 millimeters in a day) has increased. The record clearly shows that over the past four decades India has become hotter, drier, and that EWEs have become more frequent.The inclusion of climate change in the economic survey developed out of shift in political position that India made after many years of international negotiations. Starting in 1992, India’s position focused on the common but differing national responsibilities of the “equity principle,” spelled out in the provisions of climate change convention. In short, the understanding then was that climate change is a process caused by the historical and present-day greenhouse gas emissions of developed nations, and that the ability to emit carbon and grow economically is an equitable need of a developing country, such as India.It was only in 2008 that India initiated its first significant policy initiative on climate change. That’s when the Manmohan Singh government constituted the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change and when the National Plan on Climate Change was unveiled.Despite India continuing to emphasize the equity principle at the annual UN Conference of Parties (COP) at Paris in December 2015, it communicated to the world then an ambitious intended nationally determined contribution to ameliorate climate change. In Paris, India committed that, by 2030, it would reduce emissions intensity of its GDP by 33-35 percent of the 2005 value; generate 40 percent of its power needs from renewable sources; and create an additional carbon sink of 2.5 to 3 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent through additional reforestation and tree cover. Since the Paris COP, India has made good progress on the renewable energy front too.However, with the monsoons becoming erratic, India will need to do more, strengthening the climate resilience of its communities — whether they be rural villages, towns or cities. The development of effective policy planning will be especially dependent on scientific models that project scenarios at higher resolutions; at the state, district and local levels. The climate change scenarios developed by the Assessment 5 Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) only gives a South Asia-level climate change pathway, which is far too low in resolution to be useful for accurate forecasting.A dog stands amid the floodwaters of the Lakshmana Tirtha River in Hunsur, adjacent to Kodagu. Image by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.State action plans on climate change (SAPCC) were supposed to represent climate change scenarios at least up to the state level. But different states have developed SAPCCs of differing quality. While Tamil Nadu has been effective in developing a state-level projection through 2100, neighboring Kerala’s analysis has been found wanting in such granular data, and its action plan is still a work in progress.Without micro-level projections, mid- and long-term preparedness will be difficult. In recent terms, experience has shown again-and-again that preparedness plans are always seen to be lacking or insufficient when disaster strikes. Importantly, fine-tuned emergency drills will need to be developed and practiced at the local government level to protect people and property against EWEs.If India is able to begin dealing with present-day climate variability effectively, then it will be moving in the right direction to deal with future, intensifying EWE scenarios. As of now, climate change seems to have come knocking early, and there is no way of predicting with precision what path it will take in the coming decades. Preparedness is the best way forward.Banner image caption: People move through a flooded street in Kerala. Image by Vimith Shal.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Adaptation, Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change Policy, climate policy, Climate Science, Disasters, Drought, Emission Reduction, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Extreme Weather, Flooding, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, Precipitation, United Nations center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Wilderness cuts the risk of extinction for species in half

first_imgWilderness areas buffer species against the risk of extinction, reducing it by more than half, a new study shows.Places with lots of unique species and wilderness with the last remaining sections of good habitat for certain species had a more pronounced impact on extinction risk.The authors contend that safeguarding the last wild places should be a conservation priority alongside the protection and restoration of heavily impacted “hotspots.” Plant and animal species living in wilderness areas are less likely to go extinct, a recent study has found.Defined as intact habitats that haven’t been affected by human use on industrial scales, wilderness “buffers” the life it supports against the threat of extinction. In fact, it slashes the risk on average by more than half compared to that faced by species living outside these areas, Moreno Di Marco, James Watson, and colleagues reported Sept. 18 in the journal Nature.“This research provides the evidence for how essential it is for the global conservation community specifically target protecting Earth’s remaining wilderness,” Watson, an ecologist with the University of Queensland, in Australia, and the Wildlife Conservation Society, said in a statement.The rainforest in Borneo. Image by Liana Joseph/WCS.In an earlier study, Watson and a team of researchers reported that 3.3 million square kilometers (1.27 million square miles) of wilderness — an area the size of India — has been lost since the 1990s. At the same time, a recent report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services found that 1 million species are staring at the prospect of extinction.Currently, however, the focus of a lot of conservation is to protect heavily impacted “hotspots” that are disappearing as a result of human use and where many of the species are sliding toward extinction, Di Marco, the study’s lead author, said in an interview.“That’s OK if your objective is to prevent the extinction of species that are highly threatened,” said Di Marco, an ecologist at CSIRO Land and Water (Australia’s national science research agency) and Italy’s Sapienza University of Rome. But that approach doesn’t account for the benefits that intact wilderness areas provide for biodiversity, he added. Until now, no one had tabulated the role that wilderness plays in the survival of species.Uninhabited Campbell Island, New Zealand. Image by Liana Joseph/WCS.Watson and several colleagues published a map of what’s left of Earth’s wilderness in 2017, and a 2016 map plots out the locations and severity of human pressure around the globe. The team drew from that data and used a new biodiversity modeling tool developed at CSIRO Australia, which combines the differences in the makeup of species at different sites with the habitat quality at those sites. They were then able to calculate the relative importance of wilderness compared to other habitats in preventing species extinction. They found that species living outside wilderness areas were more than twice as likely on average to be threatened with extinction.Wilderness landscapes span the globe, from the high Arctic to equatorial rainforests. It turns out that the “buffering effect” of wilderness on extinction risk holds across a wide range of these habitats.“There wasn’t just one ecological or biogeographic region where wilderness areas were important,” Di Marco said.Global probabilities of species extinction in different biogeographical regions. Image courtesy of Di Marco et al., 2019.The authors note that all wilderness areas have “intrinsic conservation value,” and they store carbon, provide clean water and support the livelihoods of indigenous communities around the globe.“Wilderness areas are known to play fundamental roles for humanity,” Di Marco said.In some places, though, the effect was more substantial, especially where large tracts of wilderness still persist. Spots with lots of unique species also had a more pronounced impact on extinction risk, as did places that hold some of the last, best slices of good habitat for certain species.The research showed some wilderness areas, such as areas surrounding Madidi National Park in the Bolivian Amazon, play an extraordinary role in their respective regional contexts, where their loss would drastically reduce the probability of persistence of biodiversity. Image by Rob Wallace/WCS.But when the scientists incorporated a map of global protected areas, they found that these high-priority wilderness areas, which they identified on every continent, were only about as likely to be designated as parks and reserves as wilderness areas that weren’t as vital in warding off the risk of extinction.The central concern for the global conservation agenda right now is the protection and restoration of the most threatened habitats and species. While that’s critical to stemming the unsettling rate of biodiversity loss, it’s only part of the solution, Di Marco said. He and his colleagues contend that it’s equally important to safeguard the last wild spaces.“If we do lose those areas, what’s going to happen is a very high increase potentially in extinction rates,” Di Marco said. “We cannot disregard them.”Banner image of an elephant in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitations:Allan, J. R., Venter, O., & Watson, J. E. M. (2017). Temporally inter-comparable maps of terrestrial wilderness and the Last of the Wild. Scientific Data, 4, 170187. doi:10.1038/sdata.2017.187Di Marco, M., Ferrier, S., Harwood, T. D., Hoskins, A. J., & Watson, J. E. M. (2019). Wilderness areas halve the extinction risk of terrestrial biodiversity. Nature, 573(7775), 582-585. doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1567-7Jones, K. R., Venter, O., Fuller, R. A., Allan, J. R., Maxwell, S. L., Negret, P. J., & Watson, J. E. M. (2018). One-third of global protected land is under intense human pressure. Science, 360(6390), 788 LP – 791. doi:10.1126/science.aap9565Venter, O., Sanderson, E. W., Magrach, A., Allan, J. R., Beher, J., Jones, K. R., … Watson, J. E. M. (2016). Global terrestrial Human Footprint maps for 1993 and 2009. Scientific Data, 3(1), 160067. doi:10.1038/sdata.2016.67Watson, J. E. M., Shanahan, D. F., Di Marco, M., Allan, J., Laurance, W. F., Sanderson, E. W., … Venter, O. (2016). Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets. Current Biology, 26(21), 2929-2934. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.08.049FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecological Footprint, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Invertebrates, Logging, Mass Extinction, Plants, Poaching, Rainforests, Research, Saving Rainforests, Sixth Mass Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Photos: Top 15 new species of 2019

first_imgNiemitz’s tarsier from the Togean Islands of Indonesia. Image courtesy of Shekelle et al., 2019.Scientists Alexandra Nietsch and Carsten Niemitz first spotted this tarsier on the Togean Islands off Sulawesi, Indonesia, in 1993. Locals have known of the primate by the names bunsing, tangkasi and podi. But it took researchers more than 25 years of detailed study, including the tarsier’s vocalization and DNA, to finally describe the small primate as a species that’s new to science in a paper published in 2019. They named the species Niemitz’s tarsier (Tarsius niemitzi) in honor of the scientist who was one of the first to bring it to the attention of the scientific world. The description of Niemitz’s tarsier has increased the number of known tarsier species in Sulawesi and surrounding islands to 12, but the authors say the islands could be home to at least 16.6. Some of these nine newly described Fijian bees are restricted to a single mountaintopHomalictus terminalis is found only within 95 meters of Mount Batilamu’s peak. Image by James Dorey/Flinders University nature photographer.This year, researchers described nine new species of bees from the island country of Fiji in the southern Pacific Ocean. These colorful bees in shades of black, golden-green, and metallic, with hints of purple iridescence, are part of the genus Homalictus Cockerell, a group that’s not been taxonomically reviewed in Fiji for 40 years. Many of these bees either have very restricted distributions or are known only from single mountaintops, according to the researchers, and could soon become extinct due to changes in climate and other environmental risks. One new-to-science species, Homalictus terminalis, for example, has only been found on Mount Batilamu, where it seems to be restricted to the top 95 meters (312 feet) of the mountain peak. Another newly described species, H. ostridorsum, has only been recorded on Mount Tomanivi, while H. taveuni is named after the island of Taveuni, the only place it is known from.7. Newly described marmoset species live in part of Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearingA sketch of Mico munduruku. Image by Stephen NashWhen researchers surveying the stretch of Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará, chanced upon a group of three marmosets with white tails, they suspected that it was a potential new-to-science species. White tails are very rare among primates that live in South America; only one other primate species have it. The researchers were right. After studying the monkeys in both the forest and the laboratory, they confirmed that the marmoset, with its distinct white tail, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, was a new species. The marmoset has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós–Jamanxim interfluve. It’s not all good news, though. The Amazon forest that’s home to M. munduruku is being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion, logging, hydroelectric power plants, and gold mining.8. This new-to-science monkey lives in an ‘island’ amid deforestation in BrazilPlecturocebus parecis (left) and the closely related Plecturocebus cinerascens (right). Illustration courtesy of Stephen D. Nash.This year, scientists announced a second, new-to-science species of monkey, also found in the Amazon rainforest. The grey monkeys, named Plecturocebus parecis after the Parecis plateau in Rondônia in Brazil where they are found, were first seen by scientists in 1914. Locally known as the “otôhô,” researchers subsequently saw the monkeys once again in 2011 and confirmed that it was sufficiently distinct from the closely related ashy black titi to be classified as a separate species. The titi monkey’s habitat lies within in the “Arc of Deforestation,” an area of high deforestation where vast swathes of forest have been cleared for cattle ranching and mechanized soy farms. But so far, the monkeys seem to have escaped some of the damage because the steep slopes of the plateau they occupy offer them protection by making the habitat hard to access and unappealing for large-scale deforestation.9. New species of orange-red praying mantis mimics a waspVespamantoida wherleyi. Image by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Praying mantises tend to resemble leaves or tree trunks and come in shades of green and brown. But in 2013, researchers spotted a bright orange-red mantis with a black abdomen in a research station on the banks of the Amazon River in northern Peru. The praying mantis was not only mimicking a wasp’s bright colors, but also a wasp’s movements. Such conspicuous mimicry of wasps is rare among mantises, making this finding exciting, the researchers wrote in a paper published this year. The new-to-science species was named Vespamantoida wherleyi, the genus name Vespamantoida meaning wasp-mantis.10. New species of giant flying squirrel brings hope to one of the world’s ‘most wanted.’The Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel, or Biswamoyopterus gaoligongensis, was recently discovered last year in Yunnan, China, by Quan Li of the Kunming Institute of Zoology and his team. Image by Kadoorie Farm & Botanic Garden.Giant flying squirrels belonging to the group Biswamoyopterus are incredibly rare. The first species described in the genus, the Namdapha flying squirrel (Biswamoyopterus biswasi) from India, has been seen by researchers only once in 1981. Its Laotian relative, the Laotian giant flying squirrel (Biswamoyopterus laoensis), was first spotted by researchers in bushmeat markets of Lao PDR (Laos) in 2012. Both species are known from a single specimen each. This year, scientists in China introduced us to a third species of the genus, Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel (B. gaoligongensis), which they first spotted in the collection of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Thankfully, the team could subsequently observe the animals in the field as well and collect another specimen. Compared to the “lost” Namdapha and Laotian giant flying squirrels, researchers say that Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel’s conservation status looks “slightly optimistic.”11. Newly described pocket shark likely glows in the darkThe only known specimen of the American pocket shark was discovered in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Image by Mark Doosey.The new-to-science American pocket shark (Mollisquama mississippiensis) is the world’s second pocket shark species to be described. Researchers were surveying the eastern Gulf of Mexico to study what sperm whales eat when they collected a large sample of animals from the ocean’s depths. Among the collection was a small shark that the team hadn’t seen before. As it turned out, the animal was a previously undescribed species of pocket shark (the pocket shark gets its names not for its small size but because of small pocket-like openings or glands found behind each of its pectoral fins). This year, the researchers introduced the American pocket shark to us in a new paper, noting that the species has numerous light-producing organs or photophores covering much of the body, which possibly helps the shark glow in the dark depths of the deep sea.12. Newly described tree species from custard apple family is likely endangeredM. iddii grows up to 20 meters in height and bears white flowers. Image by Andrew Marshall.This tree, which grows up to 20 meters (66 feet) in height and bears white flowers, is extremely rare. So far, the newly described species, belonging to the custard apple family of trees, or Annonaceae, is known only from the Usambara mountains of northeastern Tanzania — a few individuals have been observed in the Amani Nature Reserve in the Eastern Usambara Mountains and one in a private reserve in western Usambara. Both reserves are ‘islands’ within a deforested landscape with an extensive clearance of forest in neighboring areas, the researchers write in a paper published this year. Researchers have named it Mischogyne iddii, after Iddi Rajabu, a resident botanist at the Amani Nature Reserve, and they estimate that fewer than 50 individuals of the tree remain in the wild.13. A new species of venomous pit viper was described from IndiaThe Arunachal pit viper camouflages well in leaf litter. Image by Rohan Pandit.In May 2016, wildlife researcher Rohan Pandit and his teammate Wangchu Phiang, a member of the indigenous Bugun tribe living in the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh in India, were surveying Arunachal’s biodiversity when they stumbled upon a snake amid the leaf litter. Pandit knew it was a species of viper, a group of venomous snakes with folding fangs, but it was unlike anything he’d seen before. So he bagged the snake and examined it in detail later, collaborating with other herpetologists to analyze the snake’s morphology and DNA. The team confirmed that the viper was a new-to-science species, and they named it Trimeresurus arunachalensis, or Arunachal pit viper. The new species is closely related to the Tibetan pit viper (Trimeresurus tibetanus), a snake known only from Tibet, but physically and anatomically, the two species are quite distinct, the researchers say.14. New species of leaf-mimicking lizard could already be victim of pet tradeUroplatus finaritra. Image by Mark D. Scherz.The leaf-tailed gecko is a master of camouflage. These lizards, belonging to the genus Uroplatus, are found only in the forests of Madagascar and have body shapes and colors that allow them to merge with dried leaves seamlessly. Researchers described a new-to-science species of a leaf-tailed gecko from Marojejy National Park in northeastern Madagascar this year, and it may already be threatened with extinction because of habitat loss and the illegal pet trade. The new species, named Uroplatus finaritra, has a somewhat compressed body, a small triangular head, and a leaf-shaped tail, and it’s a giant member of Uroplatus. Researchers are concerned that the species may already be a victim of the illegal pet trade since it looks similar to the satanic leaf-tailed gecko, a popular pet worldwide.15. New honeyeater species is known only from Indonesia’s Alor IslandThe Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.This year, scientists described a new bird species that are found only on the island of Alor in eastern Indonesia. Named Myzomela prawiradilagae or Alor myzomela, the red-headed honeyeater is known to inhabit only eucalyptus woodland at elevations above 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) on the island, and researchers worry that its habitat on Alor is already undergoing fragmentation because of the growing human population. While locals have long known of this species, researchers hope that its description as a new species will bring in more awareness about its existence, and ensure that the species does not silently become extinct. Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Insects, Mammals, New Species, Plants, Primates, Rainforests, Reptiles, Sharks, Species Discovery, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade In 2019, Mongabay covered several announcements of new-to-science species.The “discovery” of a new-to-science species is always an awe-inspiring bit of news; the outcome of dogged perseverance, months or years of field surveys, and long periods of sifting through hundreds of museum records.In no particular order, we present our 15 top picks. The discovery of a new-to-science species is always an awe-inspiring bit of news, filling us with hope. This year, researchers introduced us to several such species. Some were the result of a chance encounter; some were cases of researchers revisiting known plants and animals and giving them new identities. But most “discoveries” were the outcome of dogged perseverance, months or years of field surveys, and long periods of sifting through hundreds of museum records.Mongabay covered many of these stories. Below, in no particular order, we present our 15 top picks.1. Amazonian tree with human-sized leaves finally gets ID’d as new speciesCoccoloba gigantifolia leaves can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length. Image courtesy of Rogério Gribel.This is a story of incredible patience. Botanists first encountered individuals of this tree in 1982 while surveying the Madeira River Basin in the Brazilian Amazon. They knew it was a species of Coccoloba, a genus of flowering plants that grows in the tropical forests of the Americas, but they couldn’t pinpoint the species. The individual trees they came across weren’t bearing any flowers or fruits then, parts that are essential to describing a plant species, and the trees’ leaves were too large to dehydrate, press and carry back with them.While the plant, and its massive leaves, became locally famous, it was only in 2005, that the researchers finally collected some seeds and dying flowers from a tree. These materials weren’t good enough to describe the plant species, but the researchers sowed the seeds at the campus of the National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA), grew the seedlings, and waited. Thirteen years later, in 2018, one of the planted trees flourished and fruited, finally giving the researchers the botanical material they needed to describe the new species. The new species, named C. gigantifolia in reference to the plant’s giant leaves, grows to about 15 meters (49 feet) in height and has leaves that can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length, likely the largest known leaf among dicotyledonous plants — a large group of flowering plants that include sunflowers, hibiscus, tomatoes and roses.2. This grouper species collected from an Australian fish market almost became someone’s dinnerQueensland Museum ichthyologist Jeff Johnson with a specimen of Epinephelus fuscomarginatus. Image courtesy of Jeff Johnson.It’s not everyday that you find a previously undescribed species in a fish market, but that’s exactly what Jeff Johnson, an ichthyologist with Australia’s Queensland Museum, did. He had first heard of a mystery grouper 15 years back, and since then, received occasional photographs of the fish, which he thought was a potential new-to-science species. In 2017, when a fisherman sent Johnson a picture of the grouper yet again, Johnson tracked down the market where the fisherman had sold the fish, and bought all five individuals of the fish he found there. Then, together with his colleagues, Johnson analyzed the fish’s DNA, and compared it to those of related species in the museum. Finally, in a new paper published this year, the researchers confirmed that the grouper is indeed new to science, and they named it Epinephelus fuscomarginatus.3. Meet Mini mum, Mini ature, Mini scule: Tiny new frogs from MadagascarAn adult male Mini mum, one of the world’s smallest frogs, rests on a fingernail with room to spare. Image by Andolalao Rakotoarison.This year, herpetologists introduced us to three previously undescribed species of extremely small frogs from Madagascar, aptly named Mini mum, Mini ature, and Mini scule. All of them, just a few millimeters long, belong to Mini, a genus that is also entirely new to science. The new frog species are known from just a handful of locations, and may already be threatened with extinction. Researchers have recorded Mini mum only in Manombo Special Reserve in southeast Madagascar, for example, while Mini scule is known only from the fragmented forests of Sainte Luce Reserve. The areas in which the frogs occur are also likely small, threatened and declining.4. Newly described Chinese giant salamander may be world’s largest amphibianA. sligoi or South China giant salamander painting. Image courtesy of ZSL.For a long time, the Chinese giant salamander, which reaches lengths of more than 5 feet (1.6 meters) and is the world’s largest known living species of amphibian, was considered to be a single species, Andrias davidianus. In the past, some researchers did suspect that the salamander was probably multiple species, but a new study published this year backed the suspicion with evidence. Researchers analyzed samples of the salamander from a series of historical museum specimens to see what local wild populations of the amphibian may have been like before humans started farming the animals and moving them around extensively, and found that the salamander is not just one, but three distinct species. These include A. davidianus, A. sligoi, and a third species that hadn’t been named at the time the study was published. Of the three recognized species, the South China giant salamander (A. sligoi) is most likely the largest, reaching 2 meters (6 feet) in length, the researchers say.5. It took 25 years to describe Indonesia’s newest tarsier Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

[BGL Ligue] Progrès-Jeunesse : premier gros duel… d’entraîneurs

first_imgLe Progrès reçoit la Jeunesse ce lundi soir pour le compte de la 1re journée. Et c’est un premier gros choc entre… deux coaches – Roland Vrabec contre Nicolas Huysman – qui ont fait des merveilles en Europa League, cet été.“Est-ce que la différence cette saison peut se faire sur ces entraîneurs professionnels que la DN a recrutés ? Je ne sais pas. Posez-moi la question en fin de saison et je vous dirai.” Il y a quelques semaines, invité à donner son avis sur le recrutement de tant de coaches de standing durant le mercato estival, Olivier Ciancanelli, adjoint au Progrès et donc aux côtés de l’une de ces pointures, Roland Vrabec, avait botté en touche.On va un peu mieux cerner deux de ces «figures» avec le premier affrontement du genre. Entre un Vrabec qui a fait passer deux tours à Niederkorn et lui a permis d’accrocher les Rangers au retour et un Huysman qui est parvenu à piéger les Azerbaïdjanais de Tobol et a presque conquis un nul à l’aller contre Guimarães. Bref, deux hommes qui ont déjà fait de belles choses pour une prise de fonction et avec des groupes qui ont énormément changé. Vrabec, peut-être un peu plus distant avec ses joueurs que ne l’est Huysman, aussi volontiers chambreur que cash quand il faut dire les choses, avait déjà dit qu’il n’avait eu le temps de rien hormis préparer ses matches européens. Son homologue français lui a rendu la politesse en indiquant que ses connaissances du Progrès se limitent au strict minimum. Cela ne l’a pas empêché de préparer son déplacement au stade Jos-Haupert dès la deuxième mi-temps du match contre Guimarães, quand tout était perdu.Tim Hall suspenduAinsi, quand son président lui a dit que cela avait «dû faire plaisir à certains joueurs de rentrer en fin de partie», au Portugal, son technicien l’a détrompé sans tergiverser : «Je ne fais plaisir à personne ! Je préparais Niederkorn. C’est pour ça que j’ai sorti Duriatti.»Vrabec n’a pas eu ce souci, lui qui a eu deux jours de récupération en plus, mais aussi quelques soucis à l’avenant puisque depuis quelques jours, on ne parle que des départs potentiels de deux de ses titulaires : Mayron De Almeida et Tim Hall. Si le second est suspendu, le premier devrait bien être de la partie, son club n’ayant reçu aucune offre de qui que ce soit pour s’attacher ses services.On a du mal à imaginer ces deux hommes s’élancer dans la grande première avec aussi peu de renseignements sur l’adversaire qu’ils veulent nous le faire croire. Et on a déjà hâte de savoir ce qu’ils vont mettre en place pour aller chercher leurs premiers points. Surtout la Jeunesse, qui n’a pas pu se tester offensivement ces dernières semaines et dont le renfort, Martin Boatye, n’est pas encore prêt.Julien Mollereau Partagerlast_img read more

The cost of Champs

first_imgAs the island awaits the start of another Inter-Secondary School Sports Association (ISSA)-GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships, the question being posed is: what is the real cost of Champs? In January, the old boys’ associations of three of the biggest schools which participate in the annual event Calabar High, Jamaica College (JC), and Kingston College (KC) told The Gleaner that collectively they spend an average of $45 million each year preparing their respective athletes for the five-day championships. Manager of the JC team Ian Forbes, when asked how much his school spent on preparing a team for Championships responded: “To prepare a team properly, you would be talking in the range of $4 to 6 million.” When pressed further, he added that that amount would have been spent in only the final three to four months before the actual event. He added that the figure could go much higher. The all boys’ school has a team of 65 participating in Champs this week, down from a pool of more than 90. “If you look back to last July, last August, it’s not inconceivable. It could be in that neighbourhood ($15 million) actually. I was looking at the last three to four months,” Forbes said. “There are a number of things to be factored – nutrition, you have to pay coaches, there is medical, the feeding programme, transportation extra lessons for the boys because the boys spend such a lot of time practicing so you have to make it up somehow,” he added. Excelsior High School’s head coach David Riley, whose school runs a much smaller programme of approximately 80, split into boys’ and girls’ teams, said this week alone, his school will spend $1 million. Riley also noted that many of the facilities which other schools would have to pay for are already housed on Excelsior’s Mountain View Avenue campus, such as kitchen and boarding, which significantly reduces costs. “All costs of accommodations that other teams would incur, we have here, so we save ourselves that. And this year we are not buying new gear like, we did last year,” he added. Riley, a former head coach of Wolmer’s Boys’ School, said that while he was at the Heroes Circle-based school, the hotel bill for accommodation for Champs week alone was $600,000. “And that was for 40 people,” said Riley. This year, Champs’ title sponsors, GraceKennedy, invested $81 million into the event, a figure which represents less than one third of the amount JC spends in the course of a year to prepare its team. More than 200 boys’ and girls’ teams combined participate in championships. ISSA President Dr Walton Small said while some of the profits made from the Championships back to the schools, it is nowhere near the amount being spent. “Champs is not just about Champs. Champs is about ISSA,” he said, adding that the money ISSA makes from Champs helps to run the body’s other programmes. “To run the football programme is taking us well over $30 million or more than that, and that is just for the senior team. The Under-16 and Under-14, just the uniforms alone cost $19 million. The principals understand and the principals know that this is the main event we use to garner funds to run other sports. “Yes, we could give back more to the schools back more, but at what cost? Is it that we are going to ignore badminton, lawn tennis, table tennis, basketball, hockey, swimming? “We can’t do that. Plus we have a staff to pay and, therefore, a lot of the money from Champs goes back to those,” Small said. Meanwhile, Forbes said while the financial return to the school may not be immediately visible, there are other benefits which come from the investment. “There is the opportunity to provide for the athletes to get scholarships and professional contracts. It helps their whole programme from a marketing perspective. Everybody loves a winner, and when you win, good things flow. The stakeholders are happier, and when they are happier, they contribute more, so it’s a ripple effect,” he said.last_img read more

Sophia man charged

first_imgA man of Sophia, Georgetown, appeared before Magistrate Faith Mcgusty at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts charged with unlawful assault.It was alleged that on Tuesday 11 October 2016 at Sophia he unlawfully and maliciously wounded Funder Luke with intent to maim, disfigure and disable.Lennox Toppin, 49, pleaded not guilty to the charge.Toppin who was unrepresented, pleaded with the Magistrate for bail since he is unemployed.The Magistrate granted the defendant bail in the sum of $25,000, however the defendant made it known to the Court that he is unable to pay the bail. He further requested reduced bail amount, which was denied as the Magistrate stated that bail is maintained, considering the offence.Toppin is scheduled to make his next court appearance on 20 October 2016.last_img read more

Dismissed DTL workers stage protest at President’s office

first_imgOfficials of the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) joined with 11 dismissed workers of the Demerara Timber Limited (DTL) on Friday picketing for their dismissal to be rescinded.Standing in front of the Ministry of the Presidency, the workers all made their dissatisfaction heard. The workers were dismissed from the company following protest action taken early last month calling for bargaining with the company’s heads.The protesting dismissed workersAccording to GAWU, the company’s decision must be seen as “yet another but telling antiworker and antiunion act.”The union noted that the actions of the company must been seen as tantamount to denying the workers their rights.It was revealed that the services of the Ministry of Social Protection was sought to address the situation, however, DTL failed to comply with notices sent by the Ministry to attend meetings.“The company’s response must be seen as nothing other than blatant disrespect for the Ministry and the concerned workers” GAWU said in a release.GAWU is calling on the Social Protection Ministry (and Government) to uphold its authority and to ensure that DTL respect the laws of the country.“Our union strongly urges the Ministry (Government) to uphold its authority and, therefore, ensure that the foreign-owned company respect the laws of our country as well as the established principles and conventions which are integral to the welfare of our working people.”last_img read more

Netherlands v Argentina – Man United’s magician in waiting tackles Messi

first_img Netherlands face Argentina on Wednesday Matches between the Netherlands and Argentina are a rarity, but when these two giants of football have collided, the result has been memorable.After being thrashed 4-0 by the brilliant Cruyff-inspired Holland of 1974, the Argentines inflicted a second World Cup final heartache on the Dutch with victory on home turf in 1978, while de Oranje knocked the South Americans out of the 1998 quarters, with a memorable stroke of Dennis Bergkamp’s right boot.The two meet once again on Wednesday, with a place in the final against Germany at stake and while the story of the Netherlands’ tournament has been one of managerial masterstrokes and golden substitutes, there is a growing feeling that this could be Argentina’s tournament.talkSPORT previews the titanic clash…Head-to-head: Games played – Eight; Netherlands victories – Four; Argentina victories – Two; Games drawn – TwoNetherlandsWhat’s the story?The Netherlands’ World Cup campaign has developed into a showcase for Louis van Gaal’s perceived brilliance. The Dutch boss hasn’t been afraid to tinker with his formations, as well as make bold substitutions. His decision to bring on Tim Krul for the penalty shootout with Costa Rica proved to be inspired as the Newcastle United goalkeeper saved twice to send his side through to the semi-finals. But what sort of surprise does Van Gaal have in store for Argentina?How they reached the semi finalsOne of the tournament’s most attack-minded sides, the Netherlands hit holders Spain for five in their opening group game and followed that up with hard-earned victories over Australia and Chile. That secured them top spot in Group B and set up a last 16 showdown with Mexico. They saved their worst display for the first knockout stage, and looked to be heading out as they trailed 1-0 with three minutes left. But Van Gaal’s team has fight as well as talent and two late goals in quick succession saw them claim a remarkable victory. Against Costa Rica in the quarters, the Dutch were unable to find a way through during 120 minutes of football, and once again it was a substitute that decided the affair in dramatic circumstances.ArgentinaWhat’s the story?It looks as though the Argentines will have to navigate their way to the final with a side far from full strength. While captain and talisman Lionel Messi is firing on all cylinders, the absence of Angel Di Maria with a thigh injury and concerns over the fitness of Sergio Aguero have left the South Americans somewhat handicapped. Nevertheless, this Argentina side seem to have momentum behind them, and with Alejandro Sabella’s side due a strong performance, now would be the perfect moment for them to deliver.How they reached the semi finalsProgress has been far from serene for the Argentines and they are yet to win a game by more than one goal, despite having a relatively easy run of matches. Sabella’s chief tactic has been to get Lionel Messi on the ball and see what the Barcelona star can conjure up. Last gasp interventions against Iran and Switzerland have highlighted the 26-year-old’s importance, but there is an overwhelming feeling that La Albiceleste need a plan B for when Messi is marked out of the game, as he was for much of the 1-0 extra-time win against the Swiss. Fortune played a massive part in their quarter final victory over Belgium, with Gonzalo Higuain the hero on that occasion, but they will need to take control of their own destiny if they are to get past a resilient Dutch side.Netherlands v Argentina is LIVE on talkSPORT from 9pm (UK time). Click here to listen. 1last_img read more

Inter Milan boss Mazzarri admits Vidic regret

first_img1 Inter Milan boss Walter Mazzarri admitted he should have rested former Manchester United captain Nemanja Vidic as the Old Trafford legend’s woeful start to life in Italy continued.The Serbian moved to San Siro in the summer after eight years with United, but his move has not panned out as hoped so far.The centre-back was sent-off on his Inter debut, made an awful error that directly led to a goal in his second game and gave away a penalty in his third match, Sunday’s 4-1 home defeat to Cagliari.The penalty was saved by Samir Handanovic but it was little consolation on an awful afternoon for Vidic and Inter.And Mazzarri admits the 32-year-old should have been rested.“He is probably one of those I used too much,” said the former Napoli boss.“He’s strong and a leader, so I didn’t want to rest him, but he was fatigued and therefore below par. I take responsibility for that, as I should’ve made more changes and realised there are players who at this moment cannot play three or four times in a row.” Nemanja Vidic in action for Inter Milan last_img read more

Coral Daily Download – Liverpool ‘bankers’ for Europa League glory?

first_imgJohn Hill joins the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast to round up the latest sporting odds.The Coral spokesman claims Liverpool are the Europa League banker on Thursday night. The Reds face Turkish side Besiktas, while Everton are up against Young Boys and Tottenham play Fiorentina.There’s also a preview of England’s clashes with New Zealand and Scotland in the Cricket World Cup, and a look ahead to the Cheltenham Fesitval.Coral is the official betting partner of the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfastlast_img read more