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Tottenham transfer news LIVE: Latest updates and gossip from North London

first_imgWilliam Pugh4 Feb 2020, 9:09 pmTOTTENHAM’S Under-23s fell to a 2-1 home defeat to Brighton tonight… TOTTENHAM failed to sign a striker in January, but the man they did bring in chipped in with a goal as Steven Bergwijn opened the scoring in a 2-0 win over Man City.Meanwhile, Danny Rose has revealed he called up his agent and asked him to set up a loan to Newcastle after former Toon left-back Jetro Willems got injured.Or stay here for all the latest Spurs news and gossip…Ian Tuckey4 Feb 2020, 11:34 pmKANE RECOVERY HEATS UPSpurs’ England skipper Harry Kane could start outdoors running next month and play again in the last month of the Premier League season, reports say. The Mail say the striker, 26, has headed to the Caribbean for warm-weather training to speed up recovery from his hamstring surgery last month.He still hopes to be fully fit for this summer’s Euro 2020.Ian Tuckey4 Feb 2020, 11:20 pmSON MUST BE MORE UP FRONTSon Heung-Min will have to adjust to being a No9 in Harry Kane’s absence after Spurs boss Jose Mourinho failed to sign a direct replacement in the transfer window.That’s according to Matt Le Tissier, who told Sky Sports News he expects new winger Steven Bergwijn to stick to a less central role and Son to play further forward than usual.Former Southampton legend Le Tiss said: “I think.. he’s going to play Son as the Kane replacement and Bergwijn will come in as one of the wide men, perhaps in a position Son might have played when Kane was in the team.“So I think that just tells you, for me, that Son will be playing centre-forward for the foreseeable future.”Ian Tuckey4 Feb 2020, 10:52 pmHOJ FUND BOOSTSpurs’ interest in Southampton’s Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg has been boosted by the Saints’ pursuit of Celtic midfielder Olivier Ntcham.Southampton are being linked with a summer bid for the ex-France Under-21 star, 23.And the Saints know they might need to replace skipper Hojbjerg, 24, who has 26 caps for Denmark and joined them from Bayern Munich four years ago. William Pugh4 Feb 2020, 10:22 pmDJED SCREWED ONDJED SPENCE has signed a new contract with Middlesbrough.The right–back took to Twitter to celebrate the news. Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 1:30 pmWE’RE STILL MATESAlli added: “We were chatting afterwards [too], he was not in the best of moods — he is a winner, so it was difficult. “We haven’t seen each other for a while so it was nice to have a catch up.“I am not sure [if it deserved a red card] to be honest, I have not had a proper look back at it. It is obviously for the referee and VAR to make the decision. “They didn’t give the red card. “It is football and those things happen, so I know it was nothing intentional. He is not a player like that, so I understand.“I was a bit sore in the game, we made a decision in the game to change and hopefully it is not too bad.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 1:29 pmALLI OOPSDele Alli has revealed there is no bad blood between himself and Raheem Sterling over the tackle on him from the Manchester City winger.He said: “We were speaking about it at half-time and we are good friends. I know what sort of player Raheem is and he would never intentionally try to hurt someone. “There are no hard feelings, he is a fantastic player and we move on.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 12:49 pmDAN FORDanny Rose’s joke about being his own agent is pretty funny.The left-back was looking for a new club when realising Newcastle’s Willems got injured, before forcing through a loan switch to Tyneside.Rose, 29, told Sky Sports: “I was watching Newcastle play Chelsea and I saw the injury that Jetro had and I got on the phone to my agent and said ‘I wan’t to go there’.“It probably took a week to ten days to get there but now I’m here. I think I need to sack him don’t I?“It was just by coincidence and obviously it’s unfortunate that somebody’s had to get injured but I’m grateful that I’m here and looking forward to playing games now.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 12:27 pmSPURS FIXTURESHere are Tottenham’s upcoming matches.Their winter break has, of course, been hit by their FA Cup replay against Southampton.Wed Feb 5: Southampton (H) – FA Cup R4 replaySun Feb 16: Aston Villa (A) – PLWed Feb 19: RB Leipzig (H) – CLSat Feb 22: Chelsea (A) – PLSun Mar 1: Wolves (H) – PLAlex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 11:46 amBARNETT ON BALEThe super agent continued: “He’s in a very fortunate position.“When his contract is up hopefully he will sit down with me and his family and decide what he wants to do.“Gareth is very happy over there.“And let’s be realistic: for most clubs he is out of their league, financially.“It is all well and good to say, ‘Give up that money and go and play somewhere else’ – but it is not all about money.“It is about his lifestyle and his children, who have grown up in Madrid.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 11:42 amBALE BLOCKGareth Bale’s agent believes the Welshman will snub a transfer back to Tottenham, even when his Real Madrid contract expires.The winger, 30, is tied down until the summer of 2022 as he continues to pocket a staggering £600,000 per week – although Zinedine Zidane is unlikely to offer him an extension.But Bale’s representative Jonathan Barnett does not reckon a return to White Hart Lane would be on the cards for his client.His huge wage demands will price most clubs out of a move while the Wales international is settled – alongside his three children with childhood sweetheart Emma Rhys-Jones – in the Spanish capital.Quizzed on a potential transfer taking Bale back to Spurs, Barnett told talkSPORT: “I don’t think so, no.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 10:57 amVIEW TO A KELSouthend turned down a “six figure” offer for forward teen sensation Charlie Kelman from Spurs on deadline day.The 18-year-old has scored three goals in his last six games.But Tottenham’s offer for the Basildon ace was not high enough, according to the Southend Echo. Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 10:13 amSTANDING GUARDPep Guardiola claims Manchester City played well in their 2-0 defeat at Spurs – despite not appearing from the away changing room for 45 MINUTES after the final whistle.A debut goal from Steven Bergwijn set Tottenham on their way to victory, with Son Heung-Min bagging a second at their new stadium.Guardiola said: “We have to accept and analyse it. It is not easy. We did really well, honestly.“With this performance, how should I be critical? “This performance would be an incredible mistake to say how bad they are. We created chances and conceded few.”Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 9:37 amMAD MOU Jose Mourinho was furious after Raheem Sterling didn’t pick up a second yellow for trying to win a penalty.The Spurs boss hadn’t realised the City star was already on a yellow until his assistant told him.Mourinho jumped out of his chair and raced to the fourth official to complain about the incident, although it achieved very little.The incident happened immediately after Ilkay Gundogan had missed a penalty.Joe Brophy3 Feb 2020, 9:10 amU-GO LLORISJamie Carragher has praised Hugo Lloris for making a ‘massive difference’ for Spurs during their 2-0 win over Manchester City.He told Sky Sports: “Well, that’s a massive difference for Jose Mourinho getting this man [Lloris] back. “Gazzaniga came in, he made too many mistakes. You see the difference he has made today.“Penalty save. The save from Aguero. Off his line pretty quickly two or three times also.”Joe Brophy3 Feb 2020, 8:40 amBACK TO HIS BEST FULL-TIME – A goal from a corner just after the break costs our U23s what would have been a deserved point against @OfficialBHAFC after a hard-working display here at @StevenageFC. #PL2 #COYS ⚪ #THFC 1-2 #BHAFC ⚫ pic.twitter.com/xGs2SyTMEX— Tottenham Hotspur (@SpursOfficial) February 3, 2020Jack Figg4 Feb 2020, 7:36 pm ED IN HIS HANDS Ex-Tottenham midfielder Jamie O’Hara has revealed that Robbie Keane once FLOORED Edgar Davids with a punch in training following an altercation.The 33-year-old stated that the incident came just after the Dutch legend made the move to North London in 2005 from Inter Milan.Speaking on talkSPORT, O’Hara said: “I tell you who had a bit about him – Robbie Keane.“I remember a story with him and Edgar Davids and I hope he don’t mind me saying this.“We were at training and Edgar Davids came in from Inter Milan and he thought he was the bee’s knees.“He thought he was the guy and the main man and everything, but everyone realised Robbie Keane was the main guy at Tottenham at that time.“I remember him giving it to Keano in training and they were having a barney, and I think he tried to step to Robbie Keane and say something – and Keano just sparked him, bosh!“He just went, bang – one punch. Gone.“Then Davids has just picked himself up and walked off – and that was it. He came in the next day like, ‘morning, Robbie…’“He knew – no-one messed with Keano. He had that Irish thing about him that if he switched he would put you straight out.”Jack Figg4 Feb 2020, 6:48 pmMIXED EMOTIONSJose Mourinho was delighted with Steven Bergwijn’s goal on his debut for the club as Spurs beat Manchester City 2-0 in their Premier League clash on Sunday.After the game Mourinho spoke with BBC MOTD on the youngster’s achievement: “It’s the best way to come to a club. We were not putting pressure on him. We signed him early in the week, so we had time for him to train and speak.“He’s very intelligent, humble. At home against the Champions, to score a goal, not a normal goal, couldn’t be better for him.”Jack Figg4 Feb 2020, 5:31 pmPENALTY KING Hugo Lloris saved from the spot against Man City over the weekend. But here’s a look at some of the Frenchman’s other saves from 12-yards. Delighted to sign a new contract with the @Boro ✍🏾. Thanks to my friends and family for their guidance along this journey & also to the fans for their Great support💕. #utb pic.twitter.com/CD1KVCipm4— Djed Spence (@DjedSpence) February 3, 2020William Pugh4 Feb 2020, 9:46 pmTOTTENHAM’S Premier League stats after their 2-0 win over Man City on Sunday… Alex Terrell4 Feb 2020, 4:08 pmYOU SHALL NOT PASSSerge Aurier celebrated keeping a clean sheet against Manchester City.The Frenchman posted an Instagram picture with a roadworks symbol on, beneath a picture of him marking Raheem Sterling.Alex Terrell3 Feb 2020, 2:38 pmDEBUT DYNAMITESteven Bergwijn’s debut smasher against Manchester City was one of a host of debut goals for Spurs in recent years.According to the Tottenham website, Bergwijn’s strike was the 80th debut goal by a Tottenham player.He joins current team-mates Tanguy Ndombele and Eric Dier in goalscoring bows. Great to have Hugo back to! @AlderweireldTob back to his very best again.— Graham Roberts (@GrahamRoberts4) February 2, 2020 We just bloody needed that fantastic for us 👏👏👏the boy @JTanganga99 for his age an absolute superstar amazing mentality. And so happy for Stevie! COYS— Graham Roberts (@GrahamRoberts4) February 2, 2020Sam Street3 Feb 2020, 8:10 amHOJ HO SILVER LININGThe transfer window may be over but Tottenham have received a boost in their pursuit of Southampton’s Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg.SunSport’s Alan Nixon writes that the Saints are keen to land Celtic’s Olivier Ntcham in the summer as they look to replace their captain.And it is believed that Ntcham would be very keen to tred the well-worn path between Parkhead and St Mary’s as he has been in and out of Neil Lennon’s side this season.Joe Brophy3 Feb 2020, 7:52 amHANDY TO KNOWSteven Bergwijn scored on his Spurs debut and performed his signature celebration – which was inspired by playing Fifa with friends.He told Sky Sports: “It’s nothing special, it’s just when I play Fifa with friends, and they say ‘Do it like this’ and since then I do it.”Sam Street3 Feb 2020, 7:20 amREF-FIN ‘ELLHere is Mark Halsey’s verdict on the VAR controversy at Spurs yesterday.All hell broke loose in a crazy six-minute spell.It was simply breathtaking but a whirlwind for referee Mike Dean because there was so much action going on in quick-fire time.I’ve not seen anything like that before — it was quite unbelievable.Blimey, let’s start with the award of Manchester City’s penalty.There was no way it should have taken VAR official Kevin Friend one minute and 55 seconds to come to a decision on this.Tottenham right-back Serge Aurier had no chance of winning the ball because of the angle he challenged Sergio Aguero.It was a clear penalty and Friend should have made the call after one look at Stockley Park. But as play continued, Friend would have been checking the incident and I saw Dean communicate with the VAR when he said: “He’s played the ball?”Friend should have already alerted Dean to stop the game immediately in a neutral zone — as per the IFAB protocol.The ball went into a neutral zone several times and Aguero knew he was fouled because he stayed on the ground, yet we had a ridiculous wait.After the penalty award, the next issue was Hugo Lloris’ encroachment off his line.Had the Premier League followed the IFAB protocol on keeper movement off the line, then all of what followed could have been avoided.Load more entries…last_img read more

Xavi agrees with Al Sadd a reduction of 40% of his salary

first_imgXavi Hernández wanted to set an example when helping his club, Al Sadd, for the duration of the activity stoppage in Qatari football due to the coronavirus pandemic, agreeing to a 40% reduction in salary their annual record. In addition, the players in the squad have also agreed to lower the salary bill, although in their case we are talking about a lower percentage, around 25%. Those who will not be affected by their payroll are the rest of the staff that work in Al Sadd, since their salaries are considered relatively low compared to the head coach and other players.It is not the first gesture Xavi has during the pandemic. We must not forget that the former blaugrana donated a million euros to the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona in early April in his fight against the coronavirus, also sending a message through social networks encouraging people to collaborate in the ‘Join Coronavirus Response’ project. Right now, no one knows for sure when they will return to football in Qatar. Although it is true that the virus has spread in a much milder way than in other countries -the total count today was 5,448 cases and 8 deaths-, the authorities have already postponed the start of training in Qatari clubs for three times: the new date set by the Federation to return to the activity is next Thursday, April 30.Al Sadd still has three titles to play this season. After winning the Qatar Super Cup and the Prince Cup, he still has the League – he occupies third place eleven points behind the leader, Al Duhail, with seven days to go – the Asian Champions – leads his group after having played two days – and the Emir Cup.last_img read more

‘Extremely rare’ fossil tooth of hamster-sized monkey found in Peru

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Environment, Forests, Fossils, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Monkeys, New Species, Paleontology, Primates, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery center_img From the riverbed of the Río Alto Madre de Dios in southeastern Peru, researchers have found an extremely small tooth that belonged to a species of tiny monkey that lived some 18 million years ago.Researchers have named the new species of extinct monkey Parvimico materdei, with parvimico meaning tiny monkey and the species name referring to the river where the fossil tooth was found.From the tooth, the researchers have deduced that the monkey was exceptionally small, in the size range of marmosets and tamarins, and likely ate a mix of insects and fruits.Given how the monkey fossil record for the period between 13 million and 31 million years ago from South America is extremely scarce, creating a gap in the understanding of the evolution of New World monkeys, the discovery of P. materdei is incredibly exciting, researchers say. In 2016, researchers digging along the Río Alto Madre de Dios in the Peruvian Amazon uncovered hundreds of fossils of rodents, bats and other animals. Among the fossils was an extremely small tooth, “double the size of the head of a pin,” said Richard Kay, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University. This upper molar, Kay and his colleagues write in a new study, belonged to a species of tiny monkey no heavier than a hamster that lived in the region some 18 million years ago.When the researchers first saw the tooth among the fossil collection, they immediately knew they were looking at something special.“Monkey teeth are very diagnostic,” Kay, the lead author of the study, told Mongabay. “The team was very excited because these specimens are extremely rare.”Kay and his colleagues have named the new species of extinct monkey Parvimico materdei, with parvimico meaning tiny monkey and the species name referring to the Río Alto Madre de Dios, on the banks of which the team discovered the fossil. The fossil tooth has now been stored in the collections of the Institute of Paleontology at Peru’s National University of Piura.A 3D scan of the fossilized tooth found in Peru’s Amazon jungle. Image by Duke SMIF.A single, small tooth can’t reveal a whole lot. But to paleontologists, the size and shape of the tooth, how worn it is, and where it was found, can say a few things about what the animal may have been like.“The tooth’s crown is very well preserved and from the wear in life we can infer that it was a young individual,” Kay said in an email.The researchers have also concluded that P. materdei “was an exceptionally small monkey, in the size range of marmosets and tamarins.” The monkey also likely ate a mix of insects and fruits, the researchers say, based on the tooth’s structure.“Very small living Amazon monkeys (especially the marmosets) feed mostly on a mix of fruit and tree exudates (gum),” Kay said. “Parvimico lacks the gum component in its diet.“We can say nothing more reliably about its social habits or mode of locomotion, although tree living is probable because all known South American monkeys are arboreal,” he added.A tiny tooth may not seem like much. But fossil records of primates from South America are rare, which means that even a fossil tooth is a big deal. In fact, P. materdei is the first named Early Miocene primate from the Amazon Basin, the researchers write in the paper.The rarity of primate fossils in South America is “because the overall biomass of South American monkeys is very low compared with that of small rodents (of which we have many specimens) and marsupials,” Kay said. “Also, monkeys have long life spans and slow reproductive rates compared with rodents of similar size, so the rate of turnover is slower.”Given how scarce primate fossils from the region are, P. materdei fills a gap in understanding the evolution of New World monkeys.Researchers posit that monkeys reached South America from Africa some 40 million years ago. In South America, they diversified into the more than 150 species of New World monkeys known today, most of them living in the Amazon rainforest. However, the monkey fossil record for the period between 13 million and 31 million years ago from the region is extremely scant, and includes just a few fragments of teeth and jaws.P. materdei dates back 17 million to 19 million years, placing it “smack dab in the time and place when we would have expected diversification to have occurred in the New World monkeys,” Kay said in a statement.In fact, sediments on the banks of the Río Alto Madre de Dios are rich in fossils and are helping Kay’s team reconstruct what life was like in the Amazon 18 million years ago. The location is especially important to retrace the evolution of primates.“The proximity to the Andes is the key,” Kay said. “As the Andes rose through the Cenozoic, the adjacent originally flat-lying sediments in the piedmont region were folded, then eroded flat. Rivers crosscut the ancient sediments bringing the rock units to the surface. By contrast in the central Amazon basin, the older sediments are still deeply buried. The few other geologically old primate specimens recovered, of which there are only 4 or 5 teeth, share the same proximity to the Andes.”Sediments along the Río Alto Madre de Dios in southern Peru are rich in fossils. Image by Wout Salenbien/Duke University.Citation:Kay, R. F., Gonzales, L. A., Salenbien, W., Martinez, J. N., Cooke, S. B., Valdivia, L. A., … & Baker, P. A. (2019). Parvimico materdei gen. et sp. nov.: A new platyrrhine from the Early Miocene of the Amazon Basin, Peru. Journal of Human Evolution, 134, 102628. doi: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2019.05.016last_img read more

Debate rages over intensive oil palm farming in Gabon

first_imgBanner image of tropical forest in Gabon by Axel Rouvin via Flickr (CC BY-SA-2.0)This article was first published in French on 9 October 2019. Article published by terna gyuse Nearly 88 percent of Gabon is covered in forests, but NGOs fear that the development of oil palm plantations threatens this viable resource.Local communities accuse SOTRADER, a public-private partnership between the government and the multinational Olam, of land grabbing.Its defenders say that the project respects the environment and community social commitments.In September, the government of Gabon signed an agreement allowing the sustainable management of its high carbon stock forests. Nearly 88 percent of Gabon is covered in forests. As the country seeks to diversify its economy, including developing agriculture and commercial plantations, can it continue to protect this important resource for local communities and biodiversity? Numerous NGOs are worried by the industrial cultivation of oil palm by the multinational Olam and have launched a campaign to raise the government’s awareness of the risks plantations pose to communities and the environment.In 2015, under the framework of a programme called  GRAINE (Gabonaise des réalisations agricoles et des initiatives des nationaux engagés – Gabonese Initiative for Achieving Agricultural Outcomes with an Engaged Citizenry), the Gabonese authorities formed a public-private partnership with the firm Olam Palm Gabon for the development of a tract spanning 58,500 hectares (144,600 acres). The company, known as Société gabonaise de transformation agricole et développement durable (SOTRADER – Gabonese Company for Agricultural Transformation and Sustainable Development) set up operations in Ndendé, in Ngounié province.People living in the area, in the villages of Ferra and Nanga, had initially welcomed the project in light of their precarious economic situation. But now they are accusing the company of running a counter-productive policy. These communities want to continue to enjoy their traditional rights to use the forest for farming and harvesting, and to ensure their food sovereignty.Added to this is anger among dissatisfied young people in these villages, who are critical of the insecurity of the jobs the company has created. “The average agricultural worker’s salary, which fluctuates between 100,00 and 150,000 CFA francs per month” — about $170 to $250 — “ is difficult to achieve, even working full time, while according to management’s reports, the firm itself is seeing turnover soar exponentially,” said Mouity Kombila Dimitri, an Olam employee in the department of Dola, speaking to Mongabay by telephone.Ladislas Ndembet, chair of the NGO Muyissi Environnement, who closely monitors the multinational’s conduct, sees enormous risks for nature, communities, plants and animals. “It is in everyone’s interests that the authorities, who have ceded several thousand hectares to Olam, review their land allocation policy,” he said. “This will avoid them being booed, as has just happened to Brice Laccruche Alihanga, the president’s chief-of-staff in Mouila; residents did not want to hear him praising Olam, who they accuse of depleting the soil and running a counter-productive policy.”On September 21, the International Day of Struggle Against Monoculture Tree Plantations, a coalition of residents of the affected areas and civil society groups from across West and Central Africa launched a petition against the expansion of plantations and land grabbing.The Ngounié River in Mouila, Gabon. Image by Vincent Vaquin via Flickr (CC BY-3.0)Defenders of the projectBut Olam also has its supporters in Gabonese civil society. Hervé Omva, chair of Initiatives Développement Recherches Conseils Africa (Development Initiatives Research Councils Africa, or IDRC Africa), an NGO working to support local groups for the protection of biodiversity and increasing the value of non-timber forest products, does not agree. When asked about the growth of Olam’s plantations, he sees Olam’s activities as among those carried out in the country with due care. “I am for the sustainable development of RSPO-certified oil palm plantations,” he said. “Since its arrival in this region, Olam is to be congratulated for its work in terms of respect for the environment, basic community social commitments and especially regarding the creation of sustainable jobs.”In a press release, the NGO Croissance Saine Environnement also rejected the allegations against the project: “It is important to remember that the concession which is implicated (SOTRADER Ndendé) in the aforesaid petition has been the subject of development which is 100% compliant with zero-deforestation principles; no forest in the concession has been touched. Furthermore, no development could have taken place without the consent and approval of the communities (through FPIC [free, prior and informed consent]), including those of Nanga and Ferra, communities which actively participated in the process of protection of their ancestral lands”.According to Croissance Saine Environnement, thousands of hectares have been put under conservation as a consequence of Olam’s project. The NGO points to the social contracts that have been agreed to with the communities in the south: “Beyond even those commitments, the Olam group has developed numerous additional programmes, particularly to guarantee improvements in the living conditions of inhabitants through the implementation of revenue-generating activities”.Yvon Martial Nzantsi Miyagou, coordinator of ROSCEVAC Ngounié and an active member of Croissance Saine Environnement, tells Mongabay that the intervention of his NGO is based on a regional study of several Olam sites carried out in partnership with the Institut National Supérieur d’Agronomie et de Biotechnologies (National Higher Institute of Agronomics and Biotechnology).Marc Ona Essangui, a long-time environmental defender and the executive secretary for the NGO Brainforest who won the Goldman Prize in 2009 in recognition of his work against deforestation, does not understand these interventions. “Muyissi Environnement is an independent NGO which is criticizing Olam’s activities in the Ngounié; without even waiting for the company’s reaction, it’s Croissance Saine Environnement which is all over the newspapers,” he told Mongabay. Brainforest is a signatory of the petition alongside Muyissi Environnement.Ndembet, while not entirely opposed to Olam’s activities which he says can, to a limited extent, create wealth, settle populations, and improve their well-being, is opposed to the government’s ambition to make Gabon the leading African producer of palm oil in the very near future. “My fear stems from the fact that Olam cannot meet its commitments to the villages for whom land is fundamental. The multinational has signed social contracts which have no force without legal value, which rather resemble a fool’s bargain aimed at enriching Olam to the detriment of rural communities,” he said.Since 2000, the government of Gabon has created 13 national parks, one of which is classed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In September, Gabon signed an agreement aimed at sustainable management of its high carbon stock forests. The agreement will reward the country with payments amounting up to $150 million, based on results for the protection of high conservation value areas and maintaining its vast forest cover.Gabon is home to nearly 60 percent of the forest elephants remaining in Africa. Image by Ngangorica via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-4.0) Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Conservation, Defaunation, Environment, Forests, Land Grabbing, Palm Oil, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Indonesia protests: Land bill at center of unrest

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor In recent weeks, Indonesia has seen its largest mass protests since the “people power” movement that forced President Suharto to step down in 1998.Among a variety of pro-democracy demands, the protesters want lawmakers to scrap a controversial bill governing land use in the country.The bill defines new crimes critics say could be used to imprison indigenous and other rural citizens for defending their lands against incursions by private companies.It also sets a two-year deadline by which citizens must register their lands with the government, or else watch them pass into state control. Activists say the provision would deal a “knockout blow” to the nation’s indigenous rights movement. JAKARTA — In late September, international news outlets caught flak for their coverage of Indonesia’s largest mass protests since the 1998 uprising that led to the fall of the dictator Suharto.Headlines published by the BBC, CNN, Reuters and other foreign media implied the demonstrations, involving tens of thousands of people in major cities across the country, had arisen in response to a proposed new criminal code that would ban sex before marriage.“I did not get tear-gassed so Australians could keep having sex in Bali,” one netizen wrote on Twitter, among a barrage of reactions to the reductive reports. “This is about the future of the country.”Scrapping the criminal code changes — which also include new penalties for insulting the president and providing information about contraception — was just one of the protesters’ demands, enumerated in a seven-point declaration that has circulated online. They also want the government to repeal a new law weakening the nation’s anti-corruption agency, stop forest fires in Sumatra and Borneo, and withdraw troops from Indonesia’s easternmost Papua region, where a military crackdown against separatists has been going on for decades.Also on the list: scrap a proposed new law governing land use.Though the land bill has gotten scant media coverage, observers say it is among the most potentially transformative of a raft of controversial legislation on the verge of being passed into law.The bill defines new crimes and introduces increased penalties that, critics say, would make it easier for authorities to imprison rural citizens for defending their lands against incursions by developers. It would also allow plantation companies to retain vast land concessions for longer periods of time.Most damningly in the eyes of critics, the bill sets a two-year deadline by which citizens must register their lands with the government, or else watch them pass into state control, where they could be redistributed as part of President Joko Widodo’s land reform program or licensed out to private firms.But indigenous groups seeking formal recognition of their lands already spend at least that long, and often far longer, jumping through bureaucratic hoops. The two-year deadline would therefore constitute a “knockout blow” for the nation’s embattled indigenous rights movement, Erasmus Cahyadi, deputy secretary-general of AMAN, Indonesia’s main advocacy group for indigenous peoples, told Mongabay.Since 2013, when a landmark Constitutional Court ruling struck down the state’s claim to indigenous peoples’ forests, President Joko Widodo has recognized the rights of 55 indigenous groups to forests spanning a total of 248 square kilometers (96 square miles). But AMAN says it has mapped more than 77,600 square kilometers (30,000 square miles) of land it says belongs to 704 indigenous communities.“The bill is contrary to the spirit of the constitution,” said Arman Muhammad, AMAN’s law and human rights director.University students protest the new corruption law in Jakarta. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.The bill’s supporters argue its passage is necessary to support President Widodo’s flagship land reform program.Widodo, who was elected to a second five-year term in April, has promised to give rural communities greater control over 217,000 square kilometers (84,000 square miles) of land. But progress has been slow.As of October, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, which controls around half of the nation’s land, had only distributed a total of 28,000 square kilometers (10,800 square miles), far short of its target of 127,000 square kilometers (49,000 square miles).“It’s hard to find land for the agrarian reform [program],” Democrat Party lawmaker Herman Khaeron said at a recent panel event in Jakarta.To solve that, Herman said, the bill calls for the creation of a new body called the Land Management Agency to acquire, manage and distribute land that had gone unclaimed by citizens during the two-year window, that therefore automatically fell under state control.The bill says the agency will function as a “land bank,” implying it will be able to generate an income from leasing or selling lands, while still operating as a “nonprofit,” according to the bill. The agency must guarantee the availability of land for “social interests” as well as “development interests.”The language in the bill is vague, but critics fear the agency would treat land as a commodity to be sold to powerful investors at the expense of ordinary citizens.“Who would be able to access this land bank? Small farmers? Of course not,” Eko Cahyono, a researcher in the Department of Human Ecology at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), told Mongabay. “The ‘land bank’ would serve those with big capital, companies and development projects.”Newly reelected President Joko Widodo gives a speech during his inauguration ceremony on Oct. 20. Image by Timothy Tobing/courtesy of DFAT.Other provisions in the bill would benefit corporations at the expense of rural communities, critics say.The bill would allow plantation companies to hold a right-to-cultivate permit, known as an HGU, for 90 years, up from 60 years under the current rules.It would also let oil palm firms wait longer before providing smallholdings to local communities, a requirement under existing laws.Furthermore, the legislation stipulates prison time of five to 15 years for anyone who makes an “evil agreement that gives rise to a land dispute,” and a jail term of two years for those who “obstruct an employee and/or law enforcement officer from carrying out tasks in the land sector.”The latter provision could be used to “criminalize indigenous peoples, activists or anyone who tries to organize” against a land grab, Dewi Kartika, the secretary-general of the Consortium for Agrarian Reform (KPA), an advocacy group, told reporters in Jakarta recently.“It grants the police legal legitimacy to criminalize anyone,” she said. “Of course this will be interpreted to the maximum extent possible, to freely arrest anyone. For example, if residents try to stand in the way of their land being used to build an airport.”Hundreds, if not thousands, of Indonesian villages are embroiled in conflict with natural resources firm, with community members often resorting to physically blocking bulldozers or even setting fire to company facilities.Residents of Muara Tae, a village in eastern Borneo, try to stop a bulldozer belonging to a palm oil company from clearing their land. Image courtesy of Masrani Tran.On Sept. 26, a 21-year-old college student in Kendari, the capital of Southeast Sulawesi province and one of the cities where mass protests took place in September, was shot dead by police. Another student in Kendari, 19-year-old Yusuf Qardhawi, died of blunt-force head injuries after a protest turned into a violent riot.“We were all so upset and disappointed,” Mando Maskuri, 23, a community organizer who joined the protests in Kendari, told Mongabay. “The state is supposed to protect us, but they’re killing us.”Residents of Mando’s home island of Wawonii are involved in conflict with mining firms that hold permits to operate on their lands. As elsewhere in Indonesia, locals tend to lack documents backing their land claims, making it easy for the state to bring in corporate investors without their consent.Many people in Wawonii are trying to register their lands with the state, Mando said. But he fears the land bill sets an unrealistic timeline that will eventually cause residents to lose their lands, forcing them to migrate to other parts of the country.Students in Kendari stage a mock burial in early 2019 to express their opposition to the mining in Wawonii. Image by Kamaruddin for Mongabay.At the height of the protests in September, deliberations on the land bill and other controversial legislation were postponed. The lame-duck parliament was nearing the end of its session. New lawmakers have since been sworn in.In their final hour, however, the previous lawmakers agreed to “carry over” the land bill to the current parliament session, meaning deliberations can be resumed from the same stage by the new batch of legislators, rather than having to start all over again.Nearly half of the 575 lawmakers for the next five years are businesspeople who are affiliated with at least 1,016 companies, including mining and oil palm, according to an analysis by investigative journalism outlet Tempo and Auriga Nusantara, an NGO.President Widodo says he wants to revise at least 74 laws to make them friendlier to investors; many observers have said laws pertaining to the environment are on the list.If lawmakers try to pass the land bill, opponents could file a judicial review in a last-ditch attempt to oppose it, said Eko, the researcher.In the meantime, Mando says he is ready to take to the streets again.“If parliament tries to pass the bill, there will be massive resistance from farmers, fishermen, and civil society groups,” he said.Banner: A road cuts through a landscape denuded of forest in Indonesia’s Papua province. Image by Nanang Sujana for The Gecko Project and Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Agriculture, Crime, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Featured, Governance, Indigenous Peoples, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Reform, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Law, Law Enforcement, Palm Oil, Plantations, Politics last_img read more

Largest coral reef survey in French Polynesia offers hope

first_imgResearchers who studied and mapped coral reefs in French Polynesia over a seven-month expedition in 2012-13, have found that French Polynesia had one of the world’s healthiest corals, and some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish on the planet at the time of the surveys.Not all areas were doing well — in places that had been severely damaged in the early 2000s by tropical cyclones and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish, coral cover was extremely low.But the team observed new corals coming up at some of the damaged sites, suggesting that “there may be pockets of resilience in French Polynesia’s reefs.” Over the course of seven months in 2012 and 2013, more than 70 scientists collaborated to study and map the coral reefs around the islands of French Polynesia in the South Pacific.This was a huge undertaking. Researchers covered over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles), including places never studied by scientists before. They conducted nearly 4,000 coral reef and fish surveys in 264 dive sites across 29 islands, and mapped over 9,300 square kilometers (3,590 square miles) using satellite imagery. No other coral reef survey in French Polynesia has been conducted at this scale, said Renée Carlton, a marine ecologist with the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation.Findings from this massive expedition, published in a new report, offer hope. At the time of the surveys, French Polynesia had one of the world’s healthiest coral covers, and some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish on the planet.The surveys were part of the Global Reef Expedition (GRE), a global mission supported by the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation that aimed to map coral reefs around the world.“The goal of the Global Reef Expedition was to collect as much data as possible on the status of coral reefs, given the rapid changes we are seeing to reefs around the world,” Carlton told Mongabay. “Having a baseline understanding of the status of coral reefs is important for scientists and managers alike.”Researcher surveying a reef. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.The French Polynesia surveys threw some surprises. The live coral cover on Gambier archipelago, for example, was “extraordinary”, the researchers write, averaging 58 percent and reaching nearly 70 percent in some parts. These numbers are high not just for French Polynesia but for the whole of South Pacific, the researchers add.Similarly, Tuamotu archipelago, which also had very high coral cover, showcased some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish species compared to many other countries surveyed on the GRE, with an average of about 300 individuals per 100 square meters.“To date, these are still some of the highest observations of these metrics in the South Pacific,” Carlton said. “The coral cover we saw in Gambier was unheard of for the region, and was some of the highest coral cover we observed on the entire Global Reef Expedition.”“It’s nice to see that places like that still exist,” Nancy Knowlton, a coral reef biologist emeritus with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., told Science Magazine.Mass grouper spawning aggregation in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.The survey researchers are yet to pinpoint the factors that have allowed Gambier and Tuamotu archipelagoes to have healthier corals and fish communities compared to other places. But they suspect that both environmental conditions and human pressure could have something to do with the observed patterns.“With regards to the fish populations in Tuamotu, lower fishing pressure is likely contributing to the healthier reef fish communities,” Carlton said. “The area is also known as a particularly important breeding site for groupers so there are likely environmental factors contributing to this as well.”In the Gambier archipelago, fewer people live, she added, so factors like sedimentation and localized runoff that can otherwise lead to reef degradation, are not big problems.“There are environmental conditions that may be contributing to the higher coral cover as well — factors such as food availability, nutrients, presence of other benthic organisms, fish and invertebrate populations all contribute to a healthy reef,” Carlton said. “This is one thing we’re still trying to understand and are using data from the Global Reef Expedition to parse out possible areas of refuge and identifying reefs that might have higher resilience to environmental changes and Gambier is certainly one we’re going to be focusing on.”A grey reef shark in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Not all coral reefs in French Polynesia were doing well at the time of the surveys, though.Some parts of Society and Austral archipelagoes, for instance, had been severely damaged in the early 2000s by tropical cyclones and outbreaks of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (COTS), a large seastar that feeds on coral polyps. These regions had very low coral cover of around five to eight percent.“While COTS outbreaks aren’t unheard of, seeing the damage first-hand was initially shocking,” Carlton said.It’s been six years since the surveys, but the threats remain. In fact, with human-induced climate change, cyclones are expected to be bigger and stronger, Carlton said. Rising sea temperatures have been causing widespread coral reef bleaching, and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish continue to occur.However, during the surveys, the team observed new corals coming up at some of the damaged sites, which the researchers say is an encouraging finding.“Our research shows that there may be pockets of resilience in French Polynesia’s reefs,” Carlton said in a statement. “I am hopeful that in the face of continued natural and anthropogenic pressures, the coral reefs of French Polynesia will continue to flourish.”Since the expedition, local researchers and partners are continuing to monitor the survey sites, Carlton added.“We have shared our findings with managers and ministers in French Polynesia, as well as partners on the ground that are working toward this currently, so we’re hopeful they can use the data we provide to further protect French Polynesia’s coral reefs,” she said.Healthy reef system with a variety of coral and fish. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Acropora branching coral in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Citation:Global Reef Expedition: French Polynesia. Final Report. Purkis, S., Dempsey, A., Carlton, R.D., Andréfouët, S., Samaniego, B., Rauer, E.M., and Renaud, P.G. (2017) Khaled Bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Annapolis, MD. Vol 5: 80p. Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Fish, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Islands, Research, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Female golden rocket frogs know a good father when they hear him

first_imgFemale golden rocket frogs prefer males with longer call lengths featuring more pulses, which correlates to their parental care abilities, researchers have found.Male removal experiments in Kaieteur National Park in Guyana revealed that hatching success is four times higher in clutches with attentive fathers than those without a father present.By honestly advertising their parental care abilities, male frogs can inform females of their potential to protect their eggs and tadpoles from desiccation and predation. Rain drenched a team of ecologists in the Kaieteur National Park in Guyana as they scrambled to keep their sound equipment dry. They were recording a male golden rocket frog (Anomaloglossus beebei) chirping in a nearby bromeliad, getting close enough to prevent the low rumble of Kaieteur Falls from drowning out the 1.9-centimer-long (0.75-inch) amphibian. The minuscule male advertised for a female mate with a series of high-pitched peeps akin to an oven timer going off. Simultaneously, the ecologists believed, he conveyed his parenting skills to the discerning females.When females of this rare species listen closely, it seems to improve the likelihood that their offspring will survive. In a recent study published in Behavioral Ecology, researchers showed that male golden rocket frogs with calls lasting just milliseconds longer are better parents to their eggs and tadpoles, increasing their hatching rates and keeping them safe from predators. Females prefer to mate with such fathers, the team found – the first evidence of “good parent” advertising in frogs.Female golden rocket frog sitting on a bromeliad leaf. Photo credit: Beth A. Pettitt/University of MinnesotaThese tiny neotropical frogs, an IUCN endangered species, are not found anywhere else in the world. Constant mist from the waterfalls and open glades of tropical flowering plants that collect pools of water provide an oasis for them, but recent mining expansion nearby poses a serious threat to their small habitat. For reasons scientists do not yet grasp, only the females are a bright golden yellow. Much more clear is the species’ special co-parenting arrangement: the mothers and fathers provide different types of care, with males playing an unusually extensive role. Males protect their eggs from drying out and, when threatened by predators, transport them between the pools of water formed in leaf axils for safety.The blandly colored males rely on their distinctive vocal chops to attract females. “I was curious to explore what kind of information the females might be able to gather via this call,” said Beth A. Pettitt, an ecologist from the University of Minnesota and lead author of the study. Specifically, she wanted to investigate whether females could gain insight about the potential quality of a male’s parental care through his “voiceprint” alone.Golden rocket frog in Kaieteur National Park. Photo credit: Beth A. Pettitt/University of MinnesotaHer team visited the Guyana highlands for three-month spans in two consecutive years to get up close to the frogs during their peak breeding times. Following accepted guidelines for amphibian field research, the researchers removed 40 males from their egg clutches to test the impact of male care on hatching. When fathers were present, hatching success rose nearly four times higher, they found, though some offspring survived even with an absent father.Pettit’s team also recorded 261 calls from 29 male frogs and observed their parental care behaviors. Attentive fathers spent more time within 30 centimeters (12 inches) of their eggs and tadpoles, and defended their territory from competitive males. They found that males with longer calls were among the more attentive fathers. On average, males with shorter calls spent less time with their eggs.Finally, the ecologists re-played recordings of male calls for individual females to test their preferences. They altered several sonic properties of the calls: the pitch (or frequency), the rates (number of calls per minute) and the duration (number of pulses per call). Pitch and rates didn’t affect the females’ attention. However, they clearly preferred longer calls with more pulses — directly corresponding with the males’ attentiveness as fathers.“Call duration was the only call trait we measured that females cared about at all,” said study co-author Mark Bee, also of the University of Minnesota. “It was an honest predictor of how much time males attended their developing embryos and defended the territories where their offspring were developing.”Female golden rocket frog perched and listening to a male call. Photo credit: Beth A. Pettitt/University of MinnesotaThe team concluded that golden rocket frog calls are a strong example of the “Good Parent Hypothesis,” which predicts that females select their mates based on an honest advertisement of parenting ability. It’s one of several competing scenarios for how mating calls work in the wild.As for why calling and parental care might be linked, Pettit’s team says most parents can relate to the likely answer: energy. Raising their young and advertising via loud calls both require significant outputs of energy. Some frogs increase their oxygen consumption and metabolic rates by as much as 25 times during active calling periods, rivaling human athletes during a workout. “That’s really quite remarkable,” said Bee.“I think this is a compelling example [of the good parent hypothesis],” said biologist James Tumulty of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, who was not involved in the study. “Since calling is energetically expensive in frogs, I would interpret these results as females preferring males who are in better condition, and males in better condition may be able to do everything better.”Biologist Eva Ringler of the Messerli Research Institute in Vienna, Austria, concurs. “It seems that indeed females select for honest traits [longer calls] that reflect male parental quality,” Ringler said. Given the generally low survival rates of the frogs’ egg clutches, she would like to see future studies to determine whether the females’ choices raise the reproductive success for the species long term.Citation: Beth A Pettitt, Godfrey R Bourne, Mark A Bee, Females prefer the calls of better fathers in a Neotropical frog with biparental care, Behavioral Ecology, arz172, https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz172Lara Streiff (@LaraGStreiff) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found at news.mongabay.com/list/ucsc. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amphibians, Animal Behavior, Animals, Biodiversity, Frogs, Herps, Wildlife center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Belize officially declares wildlife corridor in key protected area complex

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A wildlife corridor in northern Belize has been officially declared by government order and, together with a system of three nature reserves in what’s known as the country’s “sugar cane belt,” will now be included in a Special Management Area in perpetuity.Belize’s Міnіѕtеr оf Аgrісulturе, Fіѕhеrіеѕ, Fоrеѕtrу, thе Еnvіrоnmеnt, Ѕuѕtаіnаblе Dеvеlорmеnt аnd Іmmіgrаtіоn ѕіgnеd іntо lаw аn оrdеr dесlаring thе Nоrth-Eаѕtеrn Віоlоgісаl Соrrіdоr on Јаnuаrу 17. Тhe lаw went іntо еffесt оn Јаnuаrу 22, according to a press release issued by the government of Belize.The 27,000-hectare Belize Norheastern Biological Corridor includes some 13,600 hectares of private lands. It was designed to connect Shipstern Nature Reserve with Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve and Honey Camp National Park, allowing safe passage for iconic wildlife such as jaguars and pumas in a region where more than 10,000 hectares or 25,000 acres of forest have been lost over the past decade. A wildlife corridor in northern Belize has been officially declared by government order and, together with a system of three nature reserves in what’s known as the country’s “sugar cane belt,” will now be included in a Special Management Area in perpetuity.Belize’s Міnіѕtеr оf Аgrісulturе, Fіѕhеrіеѕ, Fоrеѕtrу, thе Еnvіrоnmеnt, Ѕuѕtаіnаblе Dеvеlорmеnt аnd Іmmіgrаtіоn ѕіgnеd іntо lаw аn оrdеr dесlаring thе Nоrth-Eаѕtеrn Віоlоgісаl Соrrіdоr on Јаnuаrу 17. Тhe lаw went іntо еffесt оn Јаnuаrу 22, according to a press release issued by the government of Belize.The wildlife corridor was approved by Belize’s Cabinet in February 2018. Per the governmental press release, “The enactment of the order carries out Cabinet’s decision to protect important forests situated in the sugar cane belt, in order to protect the biological connectivity of protected areas and safeguard the ecosystem services provided by these forests, including watershed preservation and rain formation.”Camera trap photo of a Baird’s tapir in the Northeastern Biological Corridor. Credit: CSFI.In the release, the government of Belize sets a bold and hopeful tone for the future of forest conservation in the Central American country: “The declaration of the North-eastern Biological Corridor marks the beginning of a new era and culture of conservation for Belize. The Government commits to replicating this activity in other parts of the country in order to protect and sustainably utilize forest and other natural resources, thereby ensuring that the social, environmental, and economic benefits afforded by forests are enjoyed by Belize’s current and future generations.”The 27,000-hectare (nearly 67,000-acre) Belize Norheastern Biological Corridor includes some 13,600 hectares (nearly 34,000 acres) of private lands. It was designed to connect Shipstern Nature Reserve with Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve and Honey Camp National Park, allowing safe passage for iconic wildlife such as jaguars and pumas in a region where more than 10,000 hectares (or 25,000 acres) of forest have been lost over the past decade, according to Belize-based conservation NGO Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative (CSFI). The corridor was initially conceived of more than 20 years ago, and is the result of a partnership between the government of Belize, conservation groups like CSFI, stakeholder communities, and the private sector.Camera trap photo of a white-lipped peccary in the Northeastern Biological Corridor. Credit: CSFI.The corridor “provides large animals, such as Jaguar and Baird’s Tapirs, enough space to move freely between protected areas, and thus [helps] ensure their long-term survival,” per CSFI, which adds that “Ongoing wildlife monitoring activities within the area, confirm healthy populations of large mammal species such as jaguars, puma, Baird’s tapir and white-lipped peccaries. Without the continuous natural link between protected areas now established by this new corridor, their survival would be far from certain in the long term.”The Northeastern Biological Corridor is comprised of lowland broadleaf forests, mangroves, littoral forest, freshwater lagoons, and wetlands that support more than 1,000 species of plants and animals.“It is important to set aside the area for this type of use because it provides vital ecosystems services such as pollination, water retention and release, rain formation and flood mitigation to the surrounding sugarcane, beans, rice croplands and adjacent communities,” the government of Belize said. “The natural ecosystems within the area also provide for income generation for local communities through the provision of game meat, timber and employment opportunities with the local organizations that help to manage and protect the area.”Credit: CSFI.Credit: The Government of Belize.Camera trap photo of a jaguar in the Northeastern Biological Corridor. Credit: CSFI.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Conservation, Corridors, Deforestation, Environment, National Parks, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors last_img read more

Le Belge Lukaku (Inter Milan) appelle les joueurs à agir contre le racisme

first_imgL’attaquant belge de l’Inter Milan Romelu Lukaku, cible dimanche de cris racistes à Cagliari, a invité lundi les joueurs de football à “s’unir” et à “prendre position” face au racisme.“Nous sommes en 2019 et au lieu d’avancer, nous reculons. Et je pense qu’en tant que joueurs, nous devons nous unir et prendre position face à ce problème afin de garder ce sport propre et agréable pour tous”, a écrit Lukaku en anglais sur son compte Instagram.“De nombreux joueurs ont souffert d’abus racistes ce dernier mois. Ça a été mon cas aussi hier. Le foot est un jeu dont tout le monde doit profiter et nous ne devrions accepter aucune forme de discrimination susceptible de faire honte à notre sport”, a ajouté l’ancien avant-centre de Manchester United. Partager “Les plates-formes de réseaux sociaux doivent également travailler plus, avec les clubs, parce que chaque jour, il y a au moins un commentaire raciste sous un post d’une personne de couleur. On le dit depuis des années et il n’y a toujours rien de fait”, a encore estimé l’attaquant belge.Dimanche soir à Cagliari, des “cris de singe” ont retenti au moment où Lukaku s’apprêtait à frapper un penalty pour l’Inter. Lukaku a marqué, pour donner l’avantage à son équipe (2-1) et ces cris, parfaitement audibles à la télévision italienne, ont continué quelques secondes.Lundi après-midi, le club sarde a publié un communiqué dans lequel il assure “prendre fortement ses distances avec les événements isolés mais néanmoins condamnables ayant eu lieu à la Sardegna Arena”. “Le club souligne une fois de plus son intention d’identifier, isoler et exclure ces individus ignorants dont les comportements honteux sont totalement opposés aux valeurs que le Cagliari Calcio promeut chaque jour dans chacune de ses initiatives”, écrit le club.En avril, l’attaquant Moise Kean, alors à la Juventus, avait déjà été la cible des mêmes cris racistes après un but inscrit à Cagliari. Le Français Blaise Matuidi (Juventus) a également été victime de ces cris, toujours à Cagliari.Ce mois-ci, Paul Pogba a également été la cible de commentaires racistes après un penalty raté contre Wolverhampton, qui a privé Manchester United de la victoire. Les attaquants Marcus Rashford (Manchester United) et Tammy Abraham (Chelsea) ont eux aussi été victimes d’incidents similaires.AFPlast_img read more

[Luxembourg-Portugal] Holtz contre l’arbitrage : «Trois hommes n’avaient pas le niveau…»

first_img Partager Après avoir eu le sentiment de se faire «baiser» en Serbie, Luc Holtz n’a guère apprécié la prestation du trio arbitral, dimanche pour la réception du Portugal.Le match : «on a évolué à un niveau mondial»«Je n’aurais jamais pensé qu’on puisse poser autant de soucis aux champions d’Europe et vainqueurs de la Ligue des nations. On a évolué à un niveau mondial. Mes joueurs m’ont encore épaté. On a vraiment vu une très belle ambiance aujourd’hui avec les 8 000 personnes qui garnissaient ce stade. Deux belles équipes aussi. Seuls trois hommes n’étaient pas au niveau…», a lancé Luc Holtz, le sélectionneur luxembourgeois, en visant le trio arbitral. Avant d’ajouter : «Et surtout, le trio arbitral n’était pas neutre ! Et ça, cela me reste en travers de la gorge. En ce moment, on parle beaucoup de la VAR. Or, quand je regarde nos qualifications, je me dis qu’avec celle-ci, on aurait au minimum 7 points au classement !»Autre sujet qui fâche : «Quand je vois toute la pression mise ce week-end par l’UEFA sur nos responsables. Le fait que la veille de la rencontre, ils ne voulaient pas jouer sur ce terrain… Cela me laisse également un goût amer. Quand on va en Lituanie, on est bien obligé de s’adapter au terrain synthétique. Ici, on a quand même tous vu que cette pelouse était praticable. Certes, elle était lourde mais on doit pouvoir s’y adapter aussi. Cette pression des instances me gène.» La campagne :«La meilleure jamais réussie au Luxembourg»«Que nous manque-t-il après cette campagne pour remporter ce genre de match ou ceux face à l’Ukraine et la Serbie ? Un meilleur arbitrage», souriait Holtz, avant d’enchaîner sur un autre élément. «On a quand même pu constater que nous manquions d’efficacité en zone de finition. Si je prends par exemple le match disputé ici face aux Serbes, on a tiré 14 fois au but. Les Serbes à 7 reprises. Et le score final est de 1-3…»Mais le sélectionneur a surtout vu positif dans cette campagne. «Je suis quelqu’un qui n’aime pas être dominé et, à ce niveau-là, je constate qu’on a beaucoup moins subi que par le passé. Avant, on subissait toujours, on pensait qu’on était obligé de mettre le bloc bas. Et aujourd’hui, on est dans une situation où on presse et joue haut. Forcément, cela peut donner des espaces à nos adversaires mais en termes d’équilibre entre défendre bas ou plus haut, on a fait à mes yeux un grand pas. C’est à ce niveau-là qu’on a le plus progressé, mais je vais être certainement encore un peu plus exigeant dans le futur. Pour qu’on ait toujours davantage la maîtrise du jeu.» Pour le sélectionneur, cette campagne est «la meilleure jamais réussie par le Luxembourg. Certes, en termes de points, on a déjà fait mieux. Notamment lorsqu’on en a pris 10 voici un peu temps (NDLR : campagne de 1996). Mais en termes de performances, il n’y a pas photo !»La suite : « mars et juin seront importants»Le prochain match de qualification du Luxembourg, ce sera en septembre 2020 avec la Ligue des nations. Mais d’ici là, il y a donc pratiquement 10 mois à combler… «Les prochaines dates FIFA sont en mars, puis fin mai-début juin. Je dois encore en parler avec mes dirigeants mais mon souhait est de disputer deux rencontres à chaque fois, en vue de préparer cette deuxième édition de Ligue des nations. Car ces matches permettront d’essayer des choses, ce qui n’est pas possible quand vous jouez en qualifications. Et comme il n’y a plus d’autres matches de préparations possibles… Ce seront donc des rendez-vous très importants. Quels adversaires je souhaite ? Un bon mix serait optimal. Il faut voir qui souhaitera nous affronter mais le top mondial m’intéresse, comme les sélections moins bien classées», concluait le sélectionneur.Julien Carettelast_img read more