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Trial gardens

first_imgOver the last three decades, the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have introduced home gardeners and landscape designers to thousands of new plant varieties. Every year at the Trial Gardens’ open house, visitors have the chance to get an up-close look at a new class of vetted ornamentals ranging from gorgeous flowers and spectacular roses to hardy bulbs. As the gardens’ staff prepares to welcome the public to the 30th annual open house on July 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., hundreds of new plants will be on display, and a special wine and cheese preview event from 7 to 9 p.m. on July 13. “We enjoy sharing the beauty of the garden and highlighting some of the new plants that people can plant in their gardens,” said Allan Armitage, a UGA horticulture professor and the gardens’ founder. “After all, where is it written that research has to be ugly?” Located on the UGA campus in Athens between Snelling Dining Hall and the pharmacy building, the gardens display hundreds of annuals and perennials from plant breeders around the world. The garden is always open to the public free of charge, but the open house gives visitors a chance to learn inside knowledge about this year’s most promising plant varieties. Dozens of new rose varieties that will hit the market next year will be on display. Vegetables designed for the patio and porch will also be highlighted and include squash, peppers, tomatoes and eggplant. Armitage, who directs the gardens, will give tours throughout the day. He will also hold a book signing, and his recent titles will be on sale. The open house will include an heirloom tomato tasting, featuring 17 varieties of tomatoes grown in the trial gardens this summer. This year the staff ran trials on heirloom and new patio variety tomatoes, said B.J. Garrett, open house coordinator and garden volunteer. The tomato tasting, she said, is really the best way to let gardeners get to know a tomato variety and decide whether they want to plant it next year. Planters designed by the gardens’ staff will also be available for sale. The open house will be held rain or shine, and a donation of $5 is requested. The preview event, a Summer Evening in the Gardens, will feature wine and cheese, tours of the garden with Armitage, first pick of plants that are available for sale and cooler weather. Admission to this event is $5, and there are a limited number of spaces available. A space can be reserved by emailing contact@ugatrialgardens.com or by calling Brooke Pridemore at 770-364-3089.Parking is available in the South Campus parking deck. The Trial Gardens are located at 220 W. Green St., Athens, Ga. 30602. For more information, see ugatrial.hort.uga.edu or email contact@ugatrialgardens.com.last_img read more

NCAA must act: Gut Penn State football

first_imgJoe Paterno is dead and so is what was left of his good name, shredded to pieces by investigators who didn’t seem terribly impressed by anything the coach once did on Saturday afternoons.Jerry Sandusky will spend what is left of the rest of his life in prison, paying for crimes so despicable they are hard to even comprehend. Some former Penn State administrators could be heading there, too. After Louis Freeh’s damning report, they might want to think twice about taking their chances before a jury of their peers.The cult allowed to fester at State College has been exposed, with a once-proud university looking like a backwater institution where worshipping at the statue of Joe was more important than protecting young boys exposed to horrors that will haunt them the rest of their lives.Paterno’s family can protest all it wants, but there is no way to spin this: He hurt a place where his word was gospel, and it may be decades before anyone outside Pennsylvania hears the words “Penn State” and doesn’t immediately think of naked boys being abused in the same showers used by the young men who brought the university glory on the football field.His name has already come off a Nike child care center in Oregon. His statue outside Beaver Stadium should come down next.Unfortunately, it’s not enough. Nothing may ever be enough to make up for what is arguably the worst scandal to hit college athletics. There is no way to turn back the clock, no way to give back to the victims, now grown men, who testified against Sandusky the childhood innocence they lost forever.There are, however, ways to make sure the culture that enabled Sandusky never takes root on any college campus again; ways to help re-establish some moral authority in college sports; ways to make sure no university janitor is ever afraid again to report a terrible crime because he fears losing his job.Yes, Penn State has already paid dearly, its pristine reputation damaged beyond repair. “Winning with honor,” a motto made famous by Paterno, is worth a wince and a cringe. The school will also surely pay from the pocketbook, with untold millions going to victims in civil suits.The almighty football program at the center of all this must pay, too. It must or else we have learned nothing from this sordid mess.Don’t wait for the school to impose some voluntary sanctions on itself. It won’t happen. No one at Penn State has the guts to do it.That leaves you, NCAA. You must act. Now.No more excuses. No more using semantics to try to dance around the responsibility of policing the seamy side of college athletics.The independent investigation is complete, and it’s a safe bet it’s far more thorough than anything the NCAA could have produced. Freeh, the former FBI director, laid it all out in a 267-page report that concluded Paterno and three former administrators conspired to conceal Sandusky’s sexual attacks on children to avoid damage to the reputation of the university and its vaunted football program.Penn State football deserves to survive, though barely. The NCAA can’t give it the so-called “death penalty” anyway, because it applies only to schools that commit a major violation while on probation. Aside from that, there’s no punishment too severe for the Cowardly Lions.If Ohio State gets a one-year bowl ban for players selling jerseys, what should Penn State get for selling out a whole community? If Reggie Bush cost Southern California a four-year probation for accepting cash and cars, what should Penn State get for letting a child molester use its locker rooms for his perverse fantasies?The NCAA rulebook never contemplated this kind of thing, but that’s of no real importance. NCAA President Mark Emmert told the university in November that a failure to exhibit moral values or a pattern of “deceitful and dishonest behavior” could be cause for action by itself.Moral values went out the window when Paterno and campus officials made no move to keep Sandusky off campus in 1998 after a woman complained her child had showered with the then-assistant coach. The pattern of deceit and dishonesty followed when no one turned Sandusky over to the police after he was seen sexually abusing a boy in the showers in the football locker room.An NCAA official gave the usual bureaucratic response after the report was released, saying it needs to hear Penn State’s response to some questions before the agency can proceed. Given the devastating conclusions drawn by the Freeh report, the university might as well leave its response blank. There’s no defense.NCAA—here’s a suggestion for punishment: Give Penn State a year’s probation and bowl ban for every year Sandusky ran amok at State College since 1998, until he was arrested last year. That’s a staggering 13 years, a penalty that would gut the football program much as Sandusky gutted the lives of those young boys.They never got a second chance, but the NCAA can still take the high road and give Penn State one. Shave a year off the penalty for every year the university demonstrates it is moving forward and has control of the program. Throw in a bonus year if everything symbolic of the cult of Joe is removed from campus once and for all.Six years from now, declare it a new day and let Penn State football emerge for a new era.No, it’s not fair to the players currently enrolled. It’s not terribly fair, either, to new coach Bill O’Brien, though he had to know when signing his deal that a day of reckoning would come. And it’s certainly not fair to Penn State fans, whose only crime was believing all that was St. Joe.Remember this NCAA: There was nothing fair at all about what was done to those young boys, either.This one is so simple. There is no other choice. Gut the program. Doing anything less will strip the organization of the last bit of credibility it has as the watchdog of college athletics.(Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg(at)ap.org or http://twitter.com/timdahlberg.)last_img read more

Saints begin march to second banner in October

first_imgAnd on Saturday, November 16th, Simon Fraser University returns to the West Kootenays for the first time since they were swept in the 2012/13 BCIHL Finals. Selkirk then wraps up their fall semester schedule on Friday, November 29th against Eastern Washington. Following a long winter break for college exams and holidays, the Saints return to the ice on January 24th when they once again face EWU. February is a busy month for home action, as Selkirk hosts UVic on Saturday, February 8th, TWU on Friday, February 14th, and SFU on Saturday, February 22nd.The team then closes out the regular season at home to Trinity Western on Saturday, March 1st. The first round of the BCIHL playoffs commence the weekend of March 7th, with the winners advancing to the 2014 BCIHL Finals beginning Friday, March 14th. All Selkirk College hockey games – home and away – can be viewed live online at www.FastHockey.com. The Saints open training camp on Sunday, August 25th at the Castlegar Rec Complex and begin their 8-game exhibition schedule two nights later when they visit the Trail Smoke Eaters (7 p.m. faceoff at Cominco Arena). The Selkirk College Men’s Hockey program will raise the banner for their 2012/13 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League championship at the team’s regular season opener on Friday, October 4.Eastern Washington University will visit the Castlegar Recreation Complex for a match-up that marks the first of 12 Saints home games during the 24-game league schedule. All Selkirk home games will begin at 7:30 PM. To view the entire 2013/13 Selkirk College Men’s Hockey schedule, visit www.gosaints.ca.Ticketing details will be released in the near future. Selkirk plays a trio of additional home game games in October, beginning with a visit from the three-time league champion University of Victoria Vikes on Friday, October 11th. Then comes the Saints’ lone home doubleheader weekend when they host Thompson Rivers University on Friday, October 18th and Saturday, October 19th. Trinity Western University, who hold the distinction of being the only team to defeat the Saints on home ice during the 2012/13 season, make their first visit to Castlegar on Saturday, November 2nd.last_img read more