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Newcastle well placed for improved year

first_imgThe mid-season additions of Brendan Elliot and Peter Mata’utia coupled with new signings Jamie Buhrer, Rory Kostjasyn, Ken Sio, Josh Starling and Jacob Gagan have given the Knights much more depth heading into the 2017 season.”There is a lot more competition [for places] than there was last year,” Brown said.”Hopefully people like Chanel Mata’utia will have more luck with injuries. Chanel hurt his knee in the first two minutes against the Gold Coast in Round 1 and never got back, we are quite hopeful that Chanel will have a big year. “We are definitely a lot stronger at this stage this year than we were last year, not only with quality, but experience as well.”That depth is already showing with the battle for the custodian role, with three players capable of filling the position. “Dylan Pythian and Peter Mata’utia are probably the two most likely ones at this stage,” Brown said,”Nathan Ross is happy to play there or at wing or centre as well. He’s 27 and he’s only played 30 games, he really established himself as a winger, so we’d probably like to keep Ross there and keep a bit of stability.”The Knights returned to training on Wednesday, knowing the Downer NRL Auckland Nines are just around the corner. “In the Nines we’d like to give a few younger blokes an opportunity and some experienced players as well,” Brown said.”Fitness will play a part in that. We have some outside backs that have spent some time in rehab that have missed a bit of training so we certainly don’t want to risk anyone. “I think some of the players and especially the higher profile ones, they enjoy playing Nines. When we play the Nines we have a trial on the same weekend against a state league side on the Gold Coast. A couple of weeks after that we play Canberra.”Brown is still yet to decide on his best starting side, but said the trials and training will help make up his decision in the coming months.last_img read more

BE: Valverde feels that Bartomeu wanted his resignation

first_imgThis medium ensures that Valverde did not receive a clear response in the face to face and that, finally, Barça called his representative in the middle of the afternoon to inform him that the dismissal would be effective in the next few hours. Thus, this Tuesday will be the last day of Ernesto Valverde in Barcelona. The coach of Viandar de la Vera will go to his office in Sant Joan Despí to collect his things and say goodbye to the first team and employees of the club. They add in the BEING that the president stressed that “there was a lot of pressure” and denied the information that pointed out that the club had gone to look for Xavi Hernández to be his substitute. Valverde took the opportunity and asked them to be clear. The Txingurri called on those present to call his representative if they wanted to fire him and warned: If I did not receive an answer I would go to the training on Tuesday. Ernesto Valverde stopped being coach of FC Barcelona on Monday. In the club there were doubts with Txingurri and the defeat in the Spanish Supercup ended up sentencing him even if the team went to the Champions League qualifiers as a group champion and is the current leader of LaLiga Santander.Before the announcement of Quique Setién as his substitute, There were several meetings in the Ciutat Esportiva Joan Gamper between the board and also the board with the coach. After training, Ernesto Valverde met with Josep María Bartomeu, president, the executive director Òscar Grau and the manager Javier Bordas to elucidate his future. According to Sique Rodríguez in Cadena SER, Valverde left that meeting with the feeling that Bartomeu was trying to force his resignation.last_img read more

Semenya early Olympic 800m favourite after winning in Doha

first_imgDOHA, Qatar (AP): Caster Semenya made herself the early Olympic frontrunner by easily winning the women’s 800 metres in the Doha Diamond League meet yesterday. Semenya decimated the field in a season’s best 1:58.26 seconds, almost nine-tenths of a second better than second-place Habitam Alemu of Ethiopia, 1:59.14. It was her second standout result to start the Olympic year, after announcing her ambition last month with an unprecedented hat-trick of 400m, 800m, and 1,500m titles at the South African championships. They were all the more remarkable because she’s hardly featured since her 2012 Olympic silver medal. She still hasn’t come close to the 1:55.56 she set in winning the 2009 Worlds’, when news leaked that she would be subject to gender testing. Semenya improved on her 800m time in Stellenbosch at Doha and was delighted. “I feel very good this year. I am focused on what I am doing,” she said. “My preparation has gone really well, but I can’t say there have been many changes in my training or my attitude.” Not so happy were Dafne Schippers, the World 200 champion, who was pipped in the 100m by American Tori Bowie, and the home favourite in the men’s high jump, Mutaz Essa Barshim. Barshim, who has jumped as high as 2.43 metres in setting the Asian record, could not do any better than 2.26, and was seventh in a competition won by American Erik Kynard at 2.33. “It’s all part of the plan. This being an Olympic year, I’m taking things slow,” Barshim insisted. “Last year, I peaked early, and by July, I was practically dead. I’m not going to repeat that mistake.” Bowie, the 100 bronze-medal winner at the Worlds last year in Beijing, said: “I gave the race my everything, and the win was mine. This being an Olympic year, I’m eagerly looking ahead at the outdoor season. I feel I’m a much better runner now than I was last season.” The women’s 3,000m featured two World champions in a fascinating duel. World champion Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia prevailed against World 10,000 champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya. Ayana was pushed to clock a season’s best 8:23.11. Cheruiyot was fourth. The men’s 200m was won by American Emir Webb in a meet record of 19.85s. He was the only person to break 20 seconds. Kenyans swept the 1,500m and 3,000m steeplechase. Asbel Kiprop led Elijah Motonei Manangoi and Silas Kiplagat to the podium in the 1,500m in 3:32.15, and Conseslus Kipruto won the steeplechase. DISAPPOINTED WITH LOSSlast_img read more

Philippine bill seeks to grant nature the same legal rights as humans

first_imgArticle published by leilani Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Law A coalition in the Philippines is pushing for legislation of a “right of nature” bill, which would confer legal personhood on nature.The bill, should it pass into law, will create a paradigm shift in existing human-centered environmental laws and make individuals, governments and corporations more responsible and accountable when dealing with nature.The bill, currently in the drafting, adequately represents the connectedness between indigenous peoples and their ancestral domains, an indigenous women’s rights activist says.The bill is part of a growing movement around the world to recognize ecosystems and species as legal entities, as a way of boosting their protection amid intensifying threats. MANILA — Who speaks up in court for a dolphin or a turtle when its habitat gets polluted? Does an animal even have the right to legal redress in such a case?Those are the questions underlying a push by environmental activists and lawyers in the Philippines to expand legal protection for the environment, strengthen indigenous people’s rights over ancestral domain lands, and hold individuals, government and corporations accountable for environmental abuses and lapses.Initiated by the Philippine-Misereor Partnership Inc. (PMPI), the “right of nature” bill is currently in the draft stage. Though it has yet to be filed with either house of Congress, when it does it will be the first bill of its kind to be considered for legislation in the Philippines.Inspired by similar initiatives in Latin American countries such as Ecuador and Bolivia, the RON bill’s main purpose is to grant nature legal personhood. This would endow it with rights currently associated with humans, including the right to exist and thrive; to habitat and diversity of life; to water and clean air; to equilibrium; to restoration; to be free from chemical trespass; to natural evolution; and to develop sustainably.“We want to recognize nature as a distinct entity with legal personality,” says Macki Maderazo, the PMPI’s legal counsel. “When you say it has a legal personality then a person can represent nature before a court of law and can seek damages or prosecute persons who committed violations under the bill,” he adds.The bill, touted as “revolutionary” among lawmakers, is expected to create a paradigm shift in existing environmental protection perspectives. Current Philippine laws on the environment are human-centered, Maderazo says, focusing on protecting the environmental rights of individuals but not of the environment itself. The RON bill presents a different perspective: nature gets legal protection because it’s recognized as a distinct legal entity that deserves legal representation.Activists have previously tried to pursue the case for legal personhood for the environment in court. In 2007, a group of environment lawyers led by Benjamin Cabrido Jr. filed a case against the Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd. (JAPEX) over its oil exploration, development and exploitation activities in the Tañon Strait, the country’s largest marine protected area, between the islands of Cebu and Negros.Among the petitioners named in the case were “Resident Marine Mammals,” including “toothed whales, dolphins, porpoises, and other [cetacean] species inhabiting Tañon Strait represented by human beings in their capacity as legal guardians of the lesser life-forms and as responsible stewards of God’s creations.”After an eight-year legal battle, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the petitioners and declared null and void the service contract between JAPEX and the energy department. The court justified its ruling on apparent violations of the 1987 Constitution, the National Integrated Protected Systems Act (NIPAS) and the Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) decree.PMPI clamoured for a right of nature bill during President Rodrigo Duterte’s 2019 State of the Nation Address (SONA) last July 22. Image by PMPIBut the ruling held that animals have no “legal personality” and thus could not be represented by lawyers.“In our jurisdiction, persons and entities are recognized both in law and the Rules of Court as having standing to sue and, therefore, may be properly represented as real parties in interest. The same cannot be said about animals,” the ruling stated. “There is no way that we, humans, can claim to speak for animals let alone present that they would wish to use our court system, which is designed to ensure that humans seriously carry their responsibility including ensuring a viable ecology for themselves, which of course includes compassion for all living things.”According to Maderazo, the position of the Supreme Court essentially means that nature, its ecosystems and animals are “not a subject of the law and therefore not a subject of its protection.”“What we protect are the people who will protect the dolphins, not the dolphin itself,” he says. “But if you killed the dolphins, it will have impacts on the ecosystem and eventually affect the people. We want to expand the discussion with this bill.”The framework also syncs with indigenous people’s perspective of interconnectedness with nature, affirming that indigenous peoples are one with and cannot exist without nature, says Arline Santiago of the Igorota Foundation, a women’s community organization in the Cordilleras region.She says the bill and its implementing rules and regulations will also support the Indigenous People’s Rights Act (IPRA), particularly by clarifying the process to acquire free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) — a requirement for corporations when initiating projects within ancestral domain territories.“As of now … what’s lacking in the IPRA is the details of the process of acquiring the FPIC,” Santiago says, adding that the law doesn’t properly state the materials that corporations should prepare in obtaining the consent. “In our experience, corporations fulfill the technical requirements only while doing the FPIC. Some don’t even have any feasibility studies yet they want an FPIC.”Maderazo says he also believes the bill will complement and strengthen environmental and indigenous people’s laws in the country, though should it be enacted, the bill will require a thorough reassessment of existing laws.The bill also details a mechanism for just compensation for environmental damages, which would be allocated for the restoration of damaged areas, Maderazo says. “If there are monetary award for the damages on a coral reef or mangrove area, then this money will go to the trust fund and this money will ensure the restoration and protection of the area,” he says.The Philippine right of nature bill is part of a growing movement worldwide to recognize ecosystems and species as legal entities, as a way of boosting their protection amid intensifying threats. In 2017, a Māori tribe in New Zealand won unprecedented legal recognition of its river, the Whanganui, as a living entity by the state. In Argentina in 2014, a captive orangutan was granted “non-human person rights,” and in 2016 a captive chimpanzee in Peru was similarly granted legal personhood.In 2014, the Indian Supreme Court ruled that all non-human animals have both statutory and constitutional rights in India. That was followed by a 2015 decision from the Delhi High Court that birds have the fundamental legal right to fly, and a 2018 decision from the Uttarakhand High Court that identified members of the entire animal kingdom as persons.Banner image of a turtle in the Tubbataha Reefs National Park in the Philippines. Image by Gregory Piper/Coral Reef Image BankFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Bonobo conservation stymied by deforestation, human rights abuses

first_imgAnimals, Apes, Bonobos, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Environment, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Land Rights, Logging, Military, Mining, Old Growth Forests, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife The bonobo is a relative of the chimpanzee, and is found only in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) south of the Congo River. They are endangered, with habitat loss and the bushmeat trade their primary threats. The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the DRC’s largest nature reserve that is focused on bonobo conservation. However, deforestation rates have only increased in Sankuru since it was created in 2007. Meanwhile nearby Lomami National Park is experiencing almost no deforestation.Researchers attribute the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter. They claim that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.However, there may be a dark side to Lomami’s success. Sources claim that the military, which is tasked with protecting DRC’s national parks, have engaged in torture of people suspected of poaching. There are also reports that a community within Lomami was displaced without proper consultation or a suitable alternative location.Researchers say that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Bonobos, unlike closely related chimpanzees, choose love over war. But with each passing year, there is less room in this world for these amorous primates as the world’s largest bonobo refuge continues to lose thousands of hectares of rainforest to agricultural expansion.Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Modern chimpanzees and bonobos likely diverged from a common ancestor some 1.5 to 2 million years ago after their territory was separated by the formation of the Congo River, the world’s second largest river.Bonobos are only found on the southern side of the Congo River in the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Culturally, the bonobos are very different from the chimpanzees, choosing to live in matriarchal societies and engage in sexual rather than aggressive behavior to resolve conflict. Bonobo survey data has been difficult to obtain because of longstanding, violent conflict in the region and the remoteness of their forest habitat, but the IUCN reports the species population is endangered and in decline.The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the country’s largest nature reserve created for bonobo conservation. Sally Coxe, founder and president at Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI), said the idea for the reserve arose from a grassroots movement organized by local NGO Community Action for the Kasai Primates (ACOPRIK), which was formed in 2001 to address increasing hunting pressure on primates in the area.“With support from BCI, Sankuru conservation leader Heritier Mpo rescued an orphan bonobo named Esake that we successfully delivered to Lola ya Bonobo earlier this year,” Coxe said. “Bonobos are being hunted in parts of Sankuru; with renewed support, BCI and partners plan to strengthen bonobo monitoring and protection and conduct an awareness and anti-poaching campaign.” Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.ACOPRIK eventually reached out to the BCI for assistance in creating a community-controlled protected area. The DRC’s national authority overseeing protected areas, the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), performed its own assessment at Sankuru, and decided to prioritize the area for official protection in 2007. At this point, Coxe said an agreement was made with the local communities who agreed to no longer hunt bonobos, and to join together to create a community-managed nature reserve.“As its name indicates, the Sankuru Nature Reserve is not a national park; it is a nature reserve,” Coxe told Mongabay in an email. “It is controlled and managed locally… The people of Sankuru remain the stewards of their own land.”Coxe said biological surveys taken at the time of its creation revealed rich biodiversity, with “rare and endemic species including the okapi, bonobos, and at least ten other species of primates including the rare owl faced monkey and blue monkey, as well as Congo peafowl and forest elephants.”At the time of its creation, Sankuru was heralded as the largest protected area for great ape conservation in the world. However, the reserve has continued to lose thousands of hectares of forest every year. Satellite data from the University of Maryland (UMD) show Sankuru lost over 136,000 hectares of primary rainforest between 2001 and 2018. Further, deforestation appears have accelerated since the park was created in 2007, with over half of 2001-2018 tree cover loss – 70,800 hectares – happening between 2014 and 2018. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate the reserve is currently in the midst of another big year for deforestation.Satellite data show high levels of deforestation in Sankuru Nature Reserve this year while neighboring Lomami National Park has remained almost entirely unscathed. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite imagery shows much of the deforestation Sankuru has experienced over the past 20 years has been concentrated concentrated near towns, as well as along roads and paths that traverse the reserve. Coxe said Sankuru’s deforestation is primarily caused by expanding agriculture.“The deforestation that does exist at Sankuru stems largely from swidden (aka slash and burn) agriculture,” Coxe said. “People have inhabited this forest for centuries, and are part of its ecosystem. People are also the [primary] threat to bonobos and biodiversity.”In addition to habitat loss caused by deforestation, bonobos are threatened by the bushmeat trade. While traditional bushmeat hunting is one of the primary food and income sources for forest-dwelling people and communities in the DRC, the bushmeat trade has become increasingly commercialized with meat and animal parts sold in large cities, and even exported to other continents.The bushmeat trade has expanded partly alongside the logging industry as roads built to transport machinery, loggers and timber also give commercial hunters access to previously unreachable populations of wildlife, including chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas.The okapi (Okapia johnstoni) is a unique and endangered relative of the giraffe, and is only found in the DRC. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Terese Hart, who is the American director of the TL2 Project and the Lukuru Foundation, was instrumental in pushing the DRC government’s creation of the nearby Lomami National Park in 2016. In contrast to Sankuru, with which it shares a border, there has been very little deforestation happening within the Lomami National Park, according to satellite data from UMD.In 2009, the Wildlife Conservation Society conducted a survey in 30 percent of Sankuru. The survey only found nine old bonobo nests situated in one four-kilometer area near the eastern edge of the reserve, and found no evidence of elephants or other large mammals. Hart said her team found evidence of bonobos and okapis near the Lomami river on the eastern side of the reserve, but the elephants “were killed off years ago.”Community-based versus national park conservation modelsHart told Mongabay that she attributes the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter.“There are no villages in the Lomami National Park,” Hart said. “Because it is a national park there is a clear statement of what is and is not permitted within its borders. The Reserve has no such clarity.”Hart claimed that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.“The human landscape is particularly problematic as several ethnic groups are mixed together with conflicting land claims. One can please one group and almost certainly cause an uprising in another,” Hart said.Coxe argued that Sankuru’s community-based approach to conservation may have been ahead of its time, and its current lack of effectiveness is a consequence of inadequate funds. She contrasted this to the hardline conservation approach taken by Lomami National Park.Essylot Lubala of the Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestiere en RDC (OGF) participated in stakeholder meetings and “information exchange” with Sankuru communities, according to Sally Coxe. Here he is standing by an area of savannah within the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Image courtesy of Sally Coxe.“Protected areas that are community co-managed are relatively new in the DRC, and remain the poor and neglected cousins of African national parks,” Coxe said. “The Sankuru Nature Reserve is a multi-zoned, community-managed protected area. By contrast, Lomami is a national park, and people who had been living within its borders were expelled.”Human rights abuses cloud national parkIn the years before the Lomami National Park was created, a village called Obenge used to occupy territory which is now within the park’s borders. According to Hart, the “bushmeat” village had planned to move long before the park or any protected area was set up. She said the inhabitants agreed to leave after they were promised a new village in a different location by German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ) and World Bank, which has yet to materialize.“Although GIZ provided materials which are now being used by TL2 to build their houses, the World Bank has done nothing. These long delays are very regrettable but it should be noted that the first move of Obenge away from its original site had nothing to do with the park,” Hart said.Mongabay reached out to the World Bank to get their take, but received no response by the time this story was published.Bonobos are different than chimpanzees in many ways – they have smaller heads, darker faces, and longer hair that part down the middle. They’re also more likely to walk on two legs. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Maud Salber, who is Senior Project Coordinator for Rainforest Foundation UK, told Mongabay by email that her team surveyed 28 villages neighboring Lomami National Park to document local and indigenous communities’ perceptions of the park and conservation enforcement. She has a different account of what happened to Obenge.“Communities first left Obenge in 2013 to seek refuge from clashes between armed groups in the area. A number of people returned but they were then forced out by government forces in 2017 to make way for the park, without proper consultation,” Salber said.“They haven’t had a say in the relocation site, which they describe as wholly inadequate for their livelihoods, and the promised houses and infrastructure have not yet all been built. The process clearly did not adhere to international standards – no consultation, no compensation and no clear plan in place to compensate their loss of livelihoods”Salber said there was an effort to redraw the park’s boundaries to avoid villages, but even so, many communities lost access to significant parts of their customary lands traditionally used for hunting, fishing or gathering — putting a strain on already tenuous livelihoods. Further, she said communities complained about being harassed by park authorities who abused power for personal gain, with reported human rights abuses, and a case of sexual assault.Dr. Mwanza Ndunda, general director of the Congolese Center for Multidisciplinary Research traverses a bridge on a mission in Sankuru. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Additionally, Hart has written on her blog site that an innocent local was tortured because DRC military park guards mistook him to be an informant for a poaching warlord Thoms who has allegedly raped local women and murdered several park guards assigned to protect elephants. However, Hart said the person whom soldiers accused of collaborating with Thoms turned out to be a medicine salesman who happened to be in the wrong village at the wrong time.Hart said that the human rights abuses that are committed by park authorities are “regrettable,” but “the truth is very complicated… ‘best practices’ are difficult to assure in truly remote areas where there is no police force or government presence.”In 2017, UN Human Rights Chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein called on the DRC to halt the military from committing widespread human rights abuses. The DRC military primarily oversees the country’s exploitation of resources and protects business interests for the elites.Hart said her private NGOs had “no say” on the UN human rights chief’s call for ending DRC military abuse. She did not point to any clear steps that have been taken by park authorities to assure that human rights abuses are not committed in the future. Mongabay received no response to emails sent to DRC government offices.Grant land tenure to save the bonobos?The U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has included indigenous rights in its 2019 Special Report on Climate Change and Land, recognizing that the participation of Indigenous peoples is crucial to combating global climate change by preventing deforestation and preserving ecosystems.Salber believes there is a way that bonobos and other endangered wildlife can be conserved without causing human right abuses of indigenous forest-dwelling people. “The current trend towards more militarisation of conservation efforts certainly is not the way to go,” Salber said.“We have worked with a lot of communities around the park and it is clear that they are very committed to conserving resources for future generations. Conservation and anti-poaching efforts should engage with these communities.”Headquarters of Action Communautaire pour la Protection des Primates du Kasai (ACOPRIK), the local Sankuru NGO that spearheaded creation of the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Salber says that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Hart appeared to agree, saying that Sankuru should pursue a “series of community conservation projects around specific points of importance” in order to pull the brakes on deforestation and bonobo habitat loss.The 2013 book Of Bonobos and Men by Deni Béchard details a history of clashing approaches between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park, which both aim to protect the same particularly biodiverse area, home to large bonobos and okapi populations, near the Lomami River. In the book, Coxe reportedly said that conservationists dedicated to saving the great apes need to work together more, “to be more bonobo-like about conservation” because “there is a huge challenge saving the bonobos and very few people are available to work on it.” Banner image by DORIS META F via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).Data citation: Hansen, M.C., A. Krylov, A. Tyukavina, P.V. Potapov, S. Turubanova, B. Zutta, S. Ifo, B. Margono, F. Stolle, and R. Moore. 2016. Humid tropical forest disturbance alerts using Landsat data. Environmental Research Letters, 11 (3). Accessed through Global Forest Watch on October 23, 2019. www.globalforestwatch.orgEditor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.If you’re interested in bonobo conservation, watch more here:Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Update (October 30, 2019): After this article was published, Terese Hart (American director of the TL2 Project) and Jo Thompson (Lukuru Foundation President / Executive Director and Lukuru Project Director) reached out with more information. Hart refutes Rainforest Foundation UK’s account that the Obenge community was forced out of Lomami National Park, while Thompson lends her comments regarding the difficulties surrounding the training of Lomami park guards and the efficacy of the Community Concession conservation strategy.Hart: “Contrary to the information you have, the Obenge community chose its own relocation site. Among themselves there was no immediate consensus for a single site, but internally they came to an agreement to use the past site of Bangaliwa (abandoned village location) which was in the same groupement and maintained the advantage of relatively “easy” communication to the east (Mituku sector) where many have relatives. We had actually favored the option, promoted by another faction, for a more distant site (also abandoned village) that was closer to markets, but when there was general agreement for Bangaliwa we all tried to make the new Obenge2 possible. A couple years ago, before the creation of the park, we wrote a fairly detailed history of Obenge before and during its move. The community has not forgotten perceived “promises” made by World Bank and others. Our own FZS-TL2project has limited means to satisfy these, but construction with metal roofs is underway, thanks to materials donated by GIZ for that purpose. The advantage that Obenge has in its current location is that many of its citizens have regular work through the park. Some are Park Guards and others work part time or full time with our own project.”Thompson: “There is little evidence that community reserves conserve bonobos.  At this point there are few (if any) examples to indicate that Community Concessions will have better success than National Reserves at protecting bonobos and controlling natural resource exploitation.  In some areas human population pressure is high, in many areas resource exploitation is the only means to acquire cash despite the fact that populations are rising.  So how would individual communities deal with this? What needs to be written into each management plan?  What outside support needs to continue to be available to these communities?  We actually proposed in 2012 that a halo of community concession (communities with land tenure) be created around the Lomami National Park.  Our expectation is that they might be a first step towards improved ability for stewardship.  But it is only a small first step.The current Head Warden of the Lomami National Park is very much in favor of training guards in human rights and respectful law enforcement.  The warden before him was as well.  The problem (as mentioned by Sally Coxe) often comes down to financing.  The trainers must be brought in.  The guards must all cycle through.  Logistics, rations, evaluation all must be paid for.We are very much in favor of a more professional and humane park guard force, but that will be a small part in the huge reinforcement needed for a lawful and humane society at all levels.  The solution we hope for and most of us who live and work here, Congolese and non-Congolese alike, hope for, is a strengthened and expanded Judicial system, a re-trained and better-supported police force deployed throughout the territory and a smaller focused domestic role for a more restrained military.  That is a problem of finances and political will.  We don’t get discouraged — the stakes are too high — but there is not one simple solution and long involvement and commitment is needed on the ground to understand and support the human communities and the incredible wildlife diversity of this country.”center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rafael Van der Vaart : du football… aux fléchettes

first_imgL’international néerlandais, qui a raccroché les crampons le 5 novembre 2018, est désormais joueur professionnel de fléchettes.À 36 ans, l’ancien joueur passé notamment par l’Ajax Amsterdam, Hambourg, Tottenham et le Real Madrid, s’est reconverti dans un nouveau sport. Le Néerlandais Rafael Van der Vaart est désormais joueur professionnel de fléchettes. Il disputera les 4 et 5 mai prochain l’Open professionnel du Danemark, avec son frère Fernando.We’ll keep it Van der Vaart instead of Van der Dart. Hopefully more luck today during the ProAm together with Mighty Mike @MvG180 in Cologne pic.twitter.com/ntTcDUFPO4 — Rafael van der Vaart (@rafvdvaart) 5 janvier 2019Retraité depuis le 5 novembre 2018, il n’a pas mis longtemps pour trouver une nouvelle reconversion. Il a récemment été vice-champion du monde de fléchettes dans la catégorie célébrités. Partagerlast_img read more

[Cyclisme] Le Team Differdange s’arrêtera en fin de saison

first_imgC’est par un message électronique envoyé mardi matin que les coureurs du Team Differdange-Geba ont appris ce qu’ils avaient commencé à supposer depuis plusieurs semaines déjà.Dans cet e-mail rédigé en anglais, les dirigeants qui occupent les commandes de l’équipe depuis le début de la saison, Isabelle et Gilles Kockelmann, allaient droit au but.«Il ne nous est plus possible de poursuivre»«Après une longue et intense période de réflexion et de débats, nous sommes malheureusement arrivés à la conclusion que nous ne pouvons plus continuer en tant qu’équipe continentale en 2020. Cette décision n’a pas été facile à prendre en raison du fait que l’équipe a véritablement conquis une place de choix dans nos cœurs. Malheureusement, il n’est plus possible pour nous de maintenir la structure d’équipe en l’état, en raison du manque de soutien et d’intérêt. Le cyclisme se dirige progressivement vers un parcours professionnel à ce niveau. Pour des raisons professionnelles aussi bien que personnelles, il ne nous est plus possible de poursuivre notre mission en 2020», ont écrit aux coureurs, Gilles et Isabelle Kockelmann, les dirigeants qui avaient repris le flambeau après Gabriel Gatti, créateur de cette formation.Celui qui depuis 1998 est le président du CCI Differdange, le club historique, avait passé le relais l’hiver dernier.Le Team Differdange lors de sa présentation en début de saison (photo : Isabella Finzi)Un crêve-cœurC’est de la bouche même de Gilles Kockelmann que Gabriel Gatti a appris la mauvaise nouvelle. «J’ai forcément mal au cœur, même si notre club va continuer son activité. Mais cette équipe continentale, c’était mon bébé, j’en étais fier. J’ai reçu des appels des coureurs qui me demandaient si je ne voulais pas la relancer. J’ai 78 ans, je vais me faire opérer du cœur prochainement, et le stress m’est déconseillé. J’ai fait tout ce que je pouvais faire. J’ai bien conscience que c’est la fin d’une époque. Nous étions la plus vieille équipe de 3e division. C’est ainsi…», explique Gabriel Gatti. Il confesse néanmoins quelques sévères insomnies depuis qu’il avait deviné le chemin pris par le Team Differdange.Lors du passage de témoin, Gilles Kockelmann n’avait pas caché que l’avenir de l’équipe était inconnu même si la formation differdangeoise espérait pouvoir s’inscrire dans la durée. Ce ne sera pas le cas.L’expérience ne pourra se poursuivre au-delà de cette saison 2019, c’est forcément un véritable crève-cœur pour tous ceux qui avaient suivi l’épopée aventureuse mais très sérieuse du «Gab».Une équipe qui avait permis à un certain Jempy Drucker, au terme d’une saison 2010 solide, de se lancer dans la carrière professionnelle.Une équipe qui avait son poids dans le monde fermé des pros. Et ses entrées pour se retrouver au départ et par bonheur, dans l’échappée, de plusieurs grandes courses, qu’elles soient belges, françaises, néerlandaises, italiennes et portugaises.Il est vrai que l’équipe Differdeange-Geba, version 2019, ne disposait plus de la même enveloppe budgétaire.Jusqu’à la fin de la saisonNéanmoins, Differdange-Geba sera encore présent en cette fin de saison sur les épreuves prévues en début d’année. Par exemple, une équipe sera au départ dimanche, du Tour de Vendée, une épreuve française de catégorie 1.1 avec des équipes World Tour comme Groupama-FDJ (avec Kevin Geniets) et AG2R La Mondiale. Une autre s’alignera jeudi prochain sur Paris-Bourges.Toujours est-il que le choc va être brutal pour le monde du cyclisme luxembourgeois. Car évidemment, l’équipe continentale de Differdange faisait partie du paysage, comme aujourd’hui c’est le cas avec Leopard.Il faudra s’y faire. Les coureurs, pour leur part, vont devoir se recaser. Ce sera le cas des Luxembourgeois encore en activité. Tom Thill, par exemple, qui était dans cette équipe depuis 2009 (hormis un passage chez Leopard entre 2013 et 2014), termine, à 29 ans, ses études. Il se trouve donc à la recherche d’un club luxembourgeois pour poursuivre en 2020 une activité sportive.Ivan Centrone qui vient d’avoir 24 ans, est toujours à la recherche d’une équipe professionnelle.Ce qui semblerait acquis pour Jan Petelin, 23 ans puisqu’une formation italienne évoluant en Continental pro aurait manifesté son intérêt. Quant à Tiago Da Silva (22 ans), il serait en contact avancé avec une autre formation continentale.Denis Bastien Partager La plus vieille formation continentale (3e division) va s’arrêter dans quelques jours, faute de moyens. C’est la fin d’une époque pour le cyclisme luxembourgeois.Selon nos informations, on ne verra plus l’équipe differdangeoise évoluer dans les courses professionnelles en 2020. La fin d’une époque…last_img read more

Le journal du Luxembourg Open : le tournoi perd la tête et Petkovic

first_img Partager Petit tour d’horizon de ce qu’il s’est passé ce jeudi à Kockelscheuer…LES LUXEMBOURGEOISES DU JOUR. Il n’y en a plus, vu que Mandy Minella et Eléonora Molinaro ont été sorties en double. Accompagnée de la Suissesse Xenia Knoll, la première a été sortie 6-2, 7-6(6) en quart de finale par le duo américano-chilien Christian/Guarachi. La deuxième, qui évoluait avec la Polonaise Piter, a cédé au même stade du tournoi 6-0, 6-3 face à Carter – Stefani.LE DUO DU JOUR. Les jeunes Américaines « Coco » Gauff – Caty McNally, âgées pour rappel respectivement de 15 ans et 17 ans, se sont qualifiées pour les demi-finales du tournoi double. Gauff prenant donc au passage une petite revanche sur la Russe Anna Blinkova (qui était associée à la Japonaise Miyu Kato), qui l’avait battue en simple la veille. L’ABANDON DU JOUR. Il s’agit de l’une des chouchoutes du public de Kockelscheuer, Andrea Petkovic. L’Allemande de 32 ans, désormais 75e mondiale, était largement bandée au niveau de son genou gauche avant de monter sur le terrain pour son 2e tour face à sa compatriote Antonia Lottner (23 ans WTA 210), la dernière rescapée des qualifs. Et son handicap s’est vu dès les premiers coups de raquette. Après avoir perdu la première manche 6-1, « Petko » jeta le gant. Verdict : une inflammation au niveau du ménisque.LES RESULTATS DU JOUR.2e tour : Monica Puig (PUR) bat Kristyna Pliskova (CZE) 7-6(5), 3-6, 7-6(6) ; Anna Blinkova (RUS, n°8) bat Tajana Maria (GER) 6-0, 6-1 ; Jelena Ostapenko (LAT) bat Elise Mertens (BEL, n°1) 4-6, 6-2, 6-2 ; Antonia Lottner (GER) bat Andrea Petkovic (GER) 6-1 abandon.LE PROGRAMME DU JOUR (VENDREDI).Center CourtA partir de midi : Laura Siegemund (GER) – Elena Rybakina (KAZ, n°3) suivi de Margarita Gasparyan (RUS) – Anna Blinkova (RUS, n°8).Pas avant 18h : Jelena Ostapenko (LAT) – Antonia Lottner (GER) suivi de Monica Puig (PUR) – la vainqueur de Sorana Cirstea (ROU) – Julia Goerges (GER, n°2)J.C.last_img read more

Décès de de René Hoffmann : Chahbi a enterré son copain

first_imgLa FLF enterrait hier l’un de ses serviteurs les plus fidèles en la personne de René Hoffmann. Alors qu’elle prépare son déplacement en Serbie, la sélection marchait dans les traces de l’un des très grands amis du disparu, Chahbi Bouchaib, son responsable du matériel.«La vie, c’est de la merde.» Chahbi Bouchaib, fidèle suiveur de la sélection nationale depuis bientôt dix ans, est anéanti, sa voix presque inaudible, ses yeux rougis et il ne semble pas trop savoir quoi faire de ses mains. Lui d’habitude si rayonnant et alerte, hier bloqué et mutique, est monté en voiture à Lipperscheid après le déjeuner pour faire son boulot et quelque chose qui lui a retourné le bide : «Je dois aller voir le prêtre pour voir s’il est possible de réserver des places sur les bancs de l’église pour tous les joueurs.»L’homme qu’on enterrait hier, avec les honneurs unanimes de toute la famille du football grand-ducal, était plus qu’un ami, «c’était un frère». René Hoffmann et Chahbi Bouchaib. Deux hommes façon papys faux ennemis que l’on a vu se prendre le chou avec un sourire en coin lors de tous les rassemblements de la sélection nationale depuis 2010. Partager Le football luxembourgeois les avait en fait unis et rendus inséparables. Et c’est un bout de lui-même que cette maudite anesthésie pour un genou à changer a arraché à l’ancien ailier de Beggen, désormais âgé de 68 ans : «Le mardi, la veille de son opération, j’étais avec lui, à l’hôpital. Je lui disais que je ne savais pas si j’allais continuer longtemps la sélection sans lui, que ce n’était pas pareil. Et lui m’a répondu que non, surtout pas, que dès qu’il avait son nouveau genou, il reviendrait.»Alors le lendemain, quand il a appelé à la fédération pour recevoir le planning du déplacement en Serbie et que Luca Scornaienchi, en charge des questions de la sélection, lui a dit «Chahbi, René est mort», il n’a rien trouvé d’autre à répondre que «non, ce n’est pas vrai, j’étais avec lui hier». Sa voix en tremble encore.Il laisse un vide et tout le monde s’en rend compteLes deux hommes se connaissaient depuis 1973. Dès leur tout premier Jeunesse – Beggen disputé l’un face à l’autre, ils n’ont pu s’empêcher de jouer au chat et à la souris. Le Bouchaib attaquant venu de Florange n’a pas mis énormément de buts au Hoffmann gardien de but grandi à l’ombre des usines de sidérurgie («Un seul», sourit Bouchaib), mais il se rappelle que son aîné de quasiment dix ans était «dur avec (lui). J’étais un grand technicien et les Eschois me détestaient. René m’engueulait souvent sur la pelouse, mais à la fin, on s’excusait l’un l’autre et on s’embrassait».C’est ce rapport qu’ils ont gardé après leur carrière, une fois réunis pour s’occuper du matériel, un secteur dont Luc Holtz les avaient chargés. Ils dormaient depuis toujours dans des chambres contiguës, s’asseyaient l’un à côté de l’autre aux repas ou dans l’avion. «On ne se séparait plus.» «Il est rare qu’on trouve trace d’hommes comme ça», s’étrangle Chahbi, qui parle encore parfois de son ami au présent. «Il ne se mettait jamais en avant, était travailleur, exemplaire. J’ai un immense respect pour toute cette vie avec lui.»Posé lamentablement au fond d’un fauteuil de l’hôtel Leweck, dont il a du mal à s’extirper, Chahbi Bouchaib se revoit frapper à la porte du domicile familial, avec l’un des fils de René Hoffmann qui lui ouvre la porte. Il se revoit aussi embrasser Édith, l’épouse, sur le front. «Là, je n’ai pas pu m’empêcher de pleurer. Je n’ai pas pu me retenir. Sa femme, il en parlait tout le temps, il l’aimait. Quand on était en déplacement, des fois, il me disait “je n’aurais pas dû venir, elle est malade en ce moment”.»Sa présence massive de force tranquille va manquer à ce groupe. Les joueurs s’en rendront vite compte, pense Chahbi. «La vie continue, mais là, c’est autre chose. C’est une partie de l’histoire du football luxembourgeois qui est partie. La Jeunesse Esch aussi a perdu un homme central de son histoire comme elle n’en retrouvera peut-être jamais. Il laisse un vide et tout le monde s’en rend compte.» Lui, surtout, depuis mercredi dernier, c’est-à-dire bientôt presque une semaine, n’a plus personne à taquiner. «Et dire que dans notre dernière conversation, c’est lui qui m’a donné l’ordre de rester…»Julien Mollereaulast_img read more

Shaq on his Hollywood plans: ‘I want to be the next Rock’

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. AP: Have you ever talked to Kyrie Irving about his flat Earth beliefs ?O’Neal: No, because I said it too. But I was playing.AP: You were in make-up for four hours a day for “Uncle Drew.” How did you pass the time?O’Neal: Sleep. When I woke up, it still wasn’t done.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown AP: That’s a shame. I’d love to see you and Charles Barkley play one-on-one.O’Neal: Yeah, Charles would lose.AP: Your post-NBA career has been uncommonly busy. Why?O’Neal: Seventy percent of all professional athletes have nothing, not even a job, after they’re done. The fact that I couldn’t even call a franchise to get an interview to be a coach frightened me. So nothing was simple. Educate yourself, be nice to people and save your money. If you do that, you should be OK.AP: You have numerous TV shows and films in development. What are your Hollywood aspirations?O’Neal: I want to be as big as Rock.AP: Dwayne Johnson is the biggest movie star on the planet. That’s setting a high bar.O’Neal: We come from the same place: athletes that transition. That’s my goal. I want similar type movies. I want to get thrillers. I want to get dramas. I want to do comedies. I want to be the next Rock. I want to do a thriller where I’m like a hero and beat up all the bad guys.AP: It’s been 24 years since your big-screen debut, “Blue Chips.” Do you feel like a veteran actor?O’Neal: Well, I have shot 15 movies. I always tell my friends I shot 15 movies but they say, “Yeah, but if you play Shaq in nine of the movies, that’s not really acting.” I say, “You make a good point.” I’m just happy to have the opportunity. View comments Kyrgios fined for inappropriate behavior at Queen’s Club But post-NBA life has been far more successful for the four-time NBA champion. He’s an analyst on TNT’s “Inside the NBA,” a popular pitchman and an active entrepreneur and investor. He has dabbled in everything from professional wrestling to law enforcement. He’s even a voice setting on the Waze navigation app. This summer he will tour under the name DJ Diesel.“Uncle Drew” is just one of the projects that the 46-year-old O’Neal has going. Among his favorites is a TBS show he’s developing with Ken Jeong. Comparing their chemistry to Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan, O’Neal says it will be “‘Seinfeld”-epic-ish.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownIn an interview, O’Neal spoke about his big plans in Hollywood, why the NBA has gotten soft and where he hopes LeBron James lands this off-season.AP: What do you miss about playing in the NBA? This image released by Lionsgate shows Shaquille O’Neal as Big Fella in a scene from the film, “Uncle Drew.” (Quantrell Colbert/Lionsgate via AP)NEW YORK — Shaquille O’Neal is already known by many names. Superman. The Diesel. The Big Aristotle. But he would like to add another to the list: Movie Star.In “Uncle Drew,” which opens Friday, he plays one of the former basketball stars (all of them real pros under heavy old-man makeup) reunited by Kyrie Irving’s titular character (first created for a TV ad) to compete in a street-ball tournament at Harlem’s Rucker Park. Shaq’s character, known as Big Fella, is found running a martial arts dojo.ADVERTISEMENT O’Neal: I miss all of it. I miss interacting with the fans. I miss having the unexpected adrenaline rush, the doubts, the fear, overcoming the fear. I miss everything.AP: Do you play anymore?O’Neal: No, not at all.AP: How come?O’Neal: I ain’t got it. Right now, I’m relinquishing all my powers to my son who’s going to UCLA .ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial AP: Favorite movie?O’Neal: Oh, “Stepbrothers.” All day, every day. I know that movie by heart.AP: What else do you like?O’Neal: I just got done watching “Justice League.” I thought it was pretty good. But they held Superman out too long.AP: In vogue in today’s NBA are big men who can shoot from the perimeter . Could you have developed a three-point game?O’Neal: No, I would have played the same way. Because you can’t score 40 points a night shooting jumpers. Nobody has, nobody will. But you can score 40 points a night shooting 60, 70 percent inside the paint. The fact that guys are shooting jumpers, that’s just telling me they don’t like physical contact. Shooting jumpers is easy. Anybody can shoot a jumper. But can you bang a guy four of five times and then still have enough to score two points for your team?AP: You think the league has gotten soft.O’Neal: Of course.AP: The Lakers are rumored to be a likely landing spot for LeBron James. Do you want that to happen?O’Neal: I just want the Lakers to be like they were back in the day. I want somebody that can beat Golden State. Golden State has turned into madness. The thing that would make me very excited is if LeBron James and Kawhi Leonard came to the Lakers. Then you’d have problems in the West. Then basketball would be fun again. LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihan Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Superman’s first cape and Bilbo Baggins’ pipe to go on auction PLAY LIST 01:27Superman’s first cape and Bilbo Baggins’ pipe to go on auction05:19Exclusive interview: Michael Bay ups the action ante in ‘6 Underground’—with 2,000 stunts00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player awardlast_img read more