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上海后花园

Warren Haynes Covers Allmans, Dead, Little Feat & More For Beautiful Portland Performance

first_imgOpening the show with the album’s opening track, “Is It Me Or You,” Haynes and his band established their dynamic quickly and impressively.  While this was obviously Warren’s night, the rest of the players weren’t merely window dressing.  Everyone was afforded multiple opportunities to shine, and they each made the most of it when their number was called.  Matt Menefee showed particular skill in using his sweet fiddle tones to fill in gaps in the sonic landscapes with long drawn out notes that alternately supported and soared.  Not one for flash, Menefee wound his playing through the rest for most of the night, giving songs an arching, poignant tone.  Sipe showed why he’s been the go to drummer for guitarists like Haynes and Widespread Panic‘s Jimmy Herring for decades, playing with an unconscious precision that allows everyone else on the stage to have the confidence to stretch when needed. With a band that has now been road tested behind him, the man everyone came to see, Warren Haynes, was in perfect position to stretch out his musical legs and take the crowd on a blues influence tour of the music of the mountains.Over his time in the Allman Brothers, fronting his own band Gov’t Mule and his stint with The Dead, Warren Haynes has established himself as one of the greatest slide blues players of any generation. His years playing the music of Duane Allman has highlighted the similarities in these two legends’ styles, but Haynes has had more time to explore and expand his musical horizons. As he mixed in tracks from his newest album like the exceptional “Blue Maiden’s Tale” and the lovelorn “Coal Tattoo,” the audience saw what amounted to a musical cross-section of roots music.Haynes also possesses a voice that so perfectly blends with his playing, it sometimes gets overlooked in the light of his stunning fret board mastery.  Anything sang in his husky, emotional delivery instantly gains a gravity that can’t be ignored by listeners, and he uses that power to spectacular effect.  Wielding both his weapons with equal ease, Haynes had the crowd in the palm of his hand from the very beginning, and he never let go.The room was primed and ready for a big number shortly into the show, and Haynes delivered by launching into the instantly recognizable intro to the Allman Brothers classic “Blue Sky.” Haynes was probably more expecting the crowd’s reaction for this beloved tune than he was for his arrival onstage, so he kept his focus on the task at hand with the practiced skill and obvious love for the song.The show wound up featuring a vast number of covers, including Bob Dylan’s “Tough Mama,” Little Feat’s “Skin It Back,” Elton John’s “Madman Across The Water,” Grateful Dead’s “Loser,” and the grand finale, a performance of Allman Brothers’ masterpiece, the instrumental “Jessica.” The exchanges between band members were something to behold, as Haynes and co worked through these classics and the Ashes & Dust originals in style. The city of Portland welcomed Warren Haynes to the Aladdin Theater‘s stage with a such a cheer that the well traveled guitar player paused from plugging in his axe and look up sheepishly. He smiled for a moment, seeming to let the joyful greeting sink in before finishing his preparations and launching into the first notes of an impressive evening. Haynes is touring in support his newest release, Ashes & Dust, which incorporates the Americana and bluegrass of his youth spent in North Carolina. The album and subsequent tour has not only given his longtime fans a new perspective on his talent; it’s brought fresh faces into the fold eager to check out Haynes’ excursion into this new musical territory.Check out our chat with Warren Haynes about the Ashes & Dust album HEREWhile Haynes brought in his friends from Railroad Earth to act as his backing band for the new album’s recording sessions, he needed to gather together a new band for a national tour. Seeing the value of players who had history with each other, he started with the entire cast of the band ChessBoxer, a solid core of string players who can help him express the sounds that he was searching to share. Haynes also recruited his old friend, the versatile and deadly accurate Jeff Sipe, to keep the beat. Texas based blues rocker Jonathan Tyler and his band opened the show with a solid 45 minute blast of old school blues rock in the finest road house tradition.  Choosing such a raucous opening act worked to plan, giving the fans of the headliners more rocky based work was in the vein of much of the music they loved.  Showing a fire and grit that made them seem a more than a little dangerous, the quartet seemed intent on making the most of their opening slot. Between crashing cymbals and thick, bluesy, reverb drenched chords the early arriving crowd was very receptive to the dirty, rocking grooves they were laying down. Judging by the line that quickly formed at the merchandise table after their set ended, odds are that we’ll be hearing lots more from him in the years to come.Check out the show’s setlist below, courtesy of setlist.fm, as well as a full gallery of images by Rex Thomson:Edit this setlist | More Warren Haynes setlistscenter_img Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Vermont Yankee investigators find highest tritium level in new monitoring well

first_imgEntergy Vermont Yankee is reporting today that one of the newly installed monitoring wells, located just to the east of the nuclear power plant’s condensate water storage tank and some underground piping, appears to be closer to the source of a tritium leak because its concentration is 774,825 picocuries per liter. Vermont Yankee engineers working to identify the source of tritium in the plant’s groundwater are installing new wells closer to several plant structures to further characterize the tritium concentration in the groundwater near equipment and buildings. The continuing sampling of monitoring wells should help the investigation team locate the source. The EPA has set 20,000 picocuries per liter as a safe level for drinking water. To date, the tritium samples have been found only in monitoring wells on site in Vernon, and not in any public wells or the adjacent Connecticut River.The well that was first identified with tritium is now at 36,261 picocuries per liter. However, a well about 75 feet to the south of that one that has been as high as 80,458 picocuries per liter, is now down to 69,392. Another recently installed well further south is at 1,940 picocuries per liter, up from a recent level of 1,800. Such variation is as expected with variations of groundwater flow.   As has been the routine during this investigation, this information is being used with hydrology and monitoring studies already under way. The data received is helping direct investigators toward the source. For more details on the tritium investigation, the Vermont Department of Health has a thorough status report on the investigation at this web link: http://healthvermont.gov/enviro/rad/yankee/tritium.aspx(link is external)Also helpful is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission web page on tritium monitoring: http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/ops-experience/grndwtr-contam-trit…(link is external)Source: Entergy Vermont Yankee. 12.4.2010.last_img read more

It’s Not Everest, But…

first_imgAim high for your New Year’s resolution. No, not that high. A little lower. Lower. Good.When we finally push our bikes to the summit of Mount Mitchell, it’s crowded with retired couples limping out of RVs and families wearing SEC football sweatshirts. Everyone seems to have a tiny dog wearing a sweater. To be honest, it takes the wind out of my sail. Sure, I rode my bike to the top of the highest mountain east of the Mississippi, but I didn’t have to. I could’ve driven and gotten the same view. This is not Everest we’re summitting here.Still, I feel a little bit awesome as we strut to the top of the hill, pushing our bikes to the highest mound of dirt within 20 states, passing young children and their grandmothers who look at us with, dare I say it, awe. But then I realize they all passed us on the road climb to the top, seeing us suffer. Some of them even tell us so, saying things like, “I didn’t think you were gonna make it.”Keener, my riding partner, and I started 4.5 hours earlier on the edge of downtown Asheville. The summit of Mitchell is the turning point in our 70-mile ride. 35 miles up, 35 miles back down, most of which is tackled along the Blue Ridge Parkway, famous for its winding black top and long-range views. The problem with riding the Blue Ridge Parkway is that it makes you feel like a superhero. It’s a steady climb from Asheville to Mitchell, but the grade is mellow, and the scenery is so astounding, it’s impossible not to feel good about yourself. At mile 20, there’s so much pep in your pedal, you start thinking you should look for a sponsor. You obviously have a natural talent for it. Trek could use a rider like you.Then you hit Highway 128, the two-lane terror that connects Mitchell with the Parkway, and you remember just how human you really are.The last five miles up Highway 128 to the top of Mitchell are brutal, mainly because it comes at the end of 30 miles of steady climbing. Keener brought speakers for his iPod and cranked AC/DC for the final push. I’m usually not a fan, but when your back hurts and you’re starting to form knots in key leg muscles, sometimes the only thing that will keep you going is “Back in Black.”Even with all of the yipping dogs at the summit, I’m feeling good about myself, mainly because I’ve accomplished half of one-third of my New Year’s Resolution. I’m not good at fractions, but I believe that means I’m one-sixth of my way through my epic goal for 2013.I call it the Mount Mitchell Threesome. Let me explain.It’s a brand new year. We’re all fresh and ready to get after it, right? Make sure 2013 kicks 2012’s ass. So we make New Year’s Resolutions. In 2013, we’re going to wake early to see the sunrise every Sunday morning. Hike 50 new trails. And my personal favorite: We’re going to get in shape. Join a gym, go three times a week and shazam, you’ve got abs again. I’ve made that very same New Year’s Resolution every year since I was 13. In my mind, I saw myself spending the year ahead in a perpetual Rocky Balboa training sequence. Running in sweats, eating raw egg smoothies, chasing chickens.If you saw me in my bathing suit, you’d know I never once chased a chicken. I look nothing like Rocky. My high school basketball coach would say I never followed through with my perennial resolution because I’m lazy. I’d rather blame the resolution itself. It’s flawed. It’s too vague. Get in shape? I’m already in shape, relatively speaking. I don’t have type II diabetes, so I’m way ahead of the curve in most circles. Why not just watch a Rocky marathon? And pass another donut.So I’m taking a different approach to my 2013 resolution. I’m being specific, but also realistic. I’m never going to run a 4-minute mile. I’m never going to summit Mount Everest. Aiming for the stars is dandy if you have no intention of following through with your resolution, but if you want to succeed, aim low. Not too low, but low. Like, instead of the 29,029-foot Mount Everest, why not focus on the 6,684-foot Mount Mitchell?Yes, Mitchell has all the trappings of your typical overpopulated state park—restaurant, crowds, complimentary golf cart rides—but look past the surface and you’ve got a foreboding peak with squirrely weather and rugged trails. A legit summit of Mount Mitchell may not require a Sherpa and oxygen, but it’s nothing to be laughed at, particularly if you do it with style. That’s where the Mount Mitchell Threesome comes in.In the year 2013, I’m going “mount” Mount Mitchell three different ways, via three different routes.First, I’ll ride my road bike to the peak from Asheville: 70 miles, 8,000 feet of vertical gain. A full day’s ride to and fro. Highlights: perpetual Parkway views. Lowlights: chafing.Second, I’ll run/hike my way to the top via the Black Mountain Crest Trail. 12 miles, 5,000 feet of climbing. Highlights: miles of rocky ridge top with long-range views. Lowlights: brutal initial climb from Bowlen’s Creek.And finally, I’ll cross-country ski to the top of Mount Mitchell via a mixed route that includes the gravel Curtis Creek Road. Distance: A lot. Elevation gain: A lot. Highlights: I like snow. Lowlights: I don’t like the cold.So there you have it. The Mount Mitchell Threesome. It’s not as dramatic as climbing Everest, but it’s impressive enough to get me excited for 2013. And in the process, I might just get into shape. Cue “Eye of the Tiger.”last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week

first_imgFacebook75Tweet0Pin0ASubmitted by Adopt-A-Pet of SheltonStar is the Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week.Star is a Labrador Retriever mix.  She is a complete sweetheart and loves people of all shapes and sizes. She is not a pushy dog at all, and because her life has been difficult, loves any attention she gets. Star knows her basic obedience commands and wants to please. She actually seems to have a smile on her face and has a mischievous sense of humor.Star came to the kennel with two of her puppies, Paris and Presley and was a great mom.  The puppies have found homes and Star has been spayed so it is her turn now.    If you are looking for a sweet, loving and fun dog, Star is your girl.We have lots of great dogs and always need volunteers to help them.  Visit our website at www.adoptapet-wa.org or contact Adopt-A-Pet, on Jensen Road in Shelton, at www.adoptapet-wa.org or contact us at [email protected] or (360) 432-3091.last_img read more

Neptunes get better with age, grab third at Castlegar meet

first_imgThe Nelson Neptunes charged up the pool lanes to win to finish third at the Castlegar Aquanauts Meet as the Kootenay Summer Swim Association entered its final stage of the season.The Neptunes, which has struggled for most of the indoor swimming campaign, finished behind Kootenay powers Castlegar and Trail in the seven-team meet Sunday in the Sunflower City.
Nelson was led division three boy’s sensation, Sam Matthew.Matthew has won gold medals in every meet this season, once again capturing the top prize.Neptune assistant coaches Kiandra McLaren and Melissa Afford, won silver in division six and seven girls, respectively.Kourtney Brager took home the bronze in division three girls.The Neptunes were inspired by the spectacular swims of the winter-club swimmers.Jordan Andrusak won the gold medal in O cat 1 girls while Kelsey Andrusak claimed the bronze.Meanwhile, in O cat 2 boys, Niallan Collier also won gold.Jordan Andrusak also set no less than four new records during the meet.Andrusak set new marks in 50-meter breaststroke, 100-meter freestyle, 50-meter freestyle and 100-meter individual medley.Not to be outdone, Collier smashed records in 100-meter breaststroke, 100-meter butterfly and 200-meter individual medley.The Neptunes travel to Kimberley this weekend for the final meet of the season.The team then prepare for regionals August 6-7 in Castlegar.The top swimmers advance to the B.C. Summer Swim Championships August 15-21 in [email protected]last_img read more

The frog and the university: Meet the niche new species from Sri Lanka

first_imgBanner image of Lankanectes pera, named after Sri Lanka’s oldest university, courtesy of Pradeep Samarawickrama. The recent discovery of a new frog species in a niche habitat in Sri Lanka’s cloud forest has highlighted the need for conserving the Indian Ocean island’s dwindling montane habitats.The frog, Lankanectes pera, is named after the University of Peradeniya, the country’s oldest, and dwells only in pristine streams flowing through canopy-covered montane forests in the highest reaches of the Knuckles Mountain Range.Researchers are calling for extensive studies to inform conservation actions for the species, which they’ve recommended be classified as critically endangered, given its small range and population. A four-year study of streams in the cloud forests of Sri Lanka’s picturesque Knuckles Mountain Range has turned up an unexpected discovery: a new frog species found nowhere else on Earth.Lankanectes pera, a glistening, chocolate-hued frog, is only the second known species in the genus; the other, L. corrugatus, is also endemic to Sri Lanka. The researchers named it in honor of their alma mater and the oldest university in the country, the University of Peradeniya, affectionately referred to as Pera.In their paper published in the journal Zootaxa, the researchers identify the new species as being highly restricted to a habitat of about 360 square kilometers (139 square miles) — an area nearly 40 times smaller than the range inhabited by the more widely distributed L. corrugatus.While there are some subtle physical differences between the two species, it’s in their habitat selection where they differ the most.L.corrugatus mostly occurs in muddy substrates, including marshes and rice paddies, where they can easily burrow into soft mud and leaf litter. L. pera, however, needs pristine conditions and significant canopy cover.It dwells in streams flowing through the montane forests in the highest peaks of the Knuckles Mountain Range, at elevations of more than 1,100 meters (3,600 feet) above sea level. It’s found only in the Dothalugala, Bambarella and Riverston regions of Sri Lanka’s central highlands.And the frog doesn’t simply opt for pristine streams flowing through closed-canopy montane forests, but more specifically slow-flowing, clear and shallow streams, with enough rocks and sandy depths to offer hiding spots.The males, generally found under rocks and crevices, give a hint of their presence when they make halting calls during the day, or chorus at night, especially after soft rain that tends to perk them up. Figure shows two clearly defined clades including L. corrugatus and L. pera, with the latter being different by more than 16 mutational steps from the populations of the former. There is a clear separation between the males with a slight overlap of the females, indicated in filled circles in red (L. corrugatus) and blue (L. pera). Image © Senevirathne et al., 2018. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation: Senevirathne, G., Samarawickrama, V., Wijayathilaka, N., Manamendra-Arachchi, K., Bowatte, G., Samarawickrama, D., & Meegaskumbura, M. (2018). A new frog species from rapidly dwindling cloud forest streams of Sri Lanka—Lankanectes pera (Anura, Nyctibatrachidae). Zootaxa, 4461(4), 519-538. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4461.4.4center_img Shrinking forestsBased on L. pera’s small area of occupancy, extent of occurrence, and the small population observed during the study, the scientists have suggested a conservation status of critically endangered. In contrast, L. corrugatus occupies a much larger area and has a much bigger population size, making it a species of least concern on the IUCN Red List.The researchers warn that rapid deterioration of this niche habitat can pose a significant threat to L. pera’s survival.“Montane forests are shrinking in the face of factors that we cannot directly control, such as global warming, and factors we can control, like encroachment and habitat degradation,” co-author and evolutionary biologist Madhava Meegaskumbura told Mongabay. “The answers need to be local. We need to prioritize this species in conservation efforts by evaluating its status by applying the IUCN red-listing standards.”“Cloud forest cover is critical for the survival of the species,” said Gayani Senevirathne, the paper’s lead author and a graduate student at the University of Chicago. “Diminishing forest cover will definitely make the habitat unsuitable for this highly specialized forest-stream species.”enevirathne said the Knuckles range is already renowned as an important refuge for as many as eight micro-endemic species that are largely considered to be critically endangered or endangered.The paper says the habitat requirements of L. pera are different from those of the highly threatened micro-endemics highlighted so far, and that a future conservation strategy for the amphibians of the Knuckles Mountain Range should consider this new knowledge.L. pera lives in clear water streams under rock-strewn montane forest canopy cover in the Knuckles Mountain Range. Image courtesy of Pradeep Samarawickrama.Further researchMeegaskumbura said the new species needs “urgent conservation efforts,” as well as further studies into its biology and behavior.“Beyond the conservation efforts, it will prove interesting to delve into the life history of Lankanectes pera, including its breeding seasons, mating behavior, ability to produce more offspring, development and species ecology,” he said. “This would help in planning its conservation.”That’s also where the naming of L. pera comes in, aside from being a sentimental tribute to the university, said Senevirathne.“We also wanted to place this knowledge before the university which has some of the best minds in the fields of sciences and humanities,” he said. “Peradeniya University is best equipped to lead the conservation efforts of the new species. It is also closely located to the Knuckles region, the frog’s habitat.”Meegaskumbura seconded the notion, adding he hoped that “the university after which the frog has been named would treat the conservation needs of this frog as a priority and play the lead role.”And the story of Lankanectes might still have a few more surprises in store, Meegaskumbura hinted.“The habitat of [L. pera] is surrounded by L. corrugatus, the common lowland species,” he said. “This creates a clear genetic barrier for the spread of the species to the other mountain ranges.“There however could be relict populations that are genetically close to L. pera, especially on the adjacent Central Highlands,” he added. “I would still expect those populations to be somewhat genetically distinct from L. pera.” Amphibians, Biodiversity, Cloud Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

Palm oil processors top plantations in destroying proboscis monkey habitat

first_imgBanner image: Proboscis monkeys in Borneo have lost habitat to oil palm plantations and shrimp farms. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Animals, Apes, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Mangroves, Monkeys, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The oil palm processing industry has overtaken palm plantations as the biggest cause of the loss of habitat for the endangered proboscis monkey in Indonesia’s Balikpapan Bay.A new study pinpoints the shift to 2007, when suitable land for palm oil plantations ran out and there was a boom in building the industry and infrastructure to process and ship out the commodity.Plantations continue to be a key factor in the loss of habitat, with RSPO-certified companies clearing proboscis monkey habitat despite such activity being prohibited under the terms of the sustainability scheme.The area continues to face further threats with plans for greater industrial expansion and the development of a new capital city nearby. JAKARTA — The oil palm processing industry has become the biggest threat to the iconic and endangered proboscis monkeys of Indonesian Borneo, a new study has found.The study, published in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation, analyzed the loss of habitat of the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) in Balikpapan Bay, home to one of the largest populations of the species, using data from 2000 to 2017.It found that during that period, the monkey’s habitat shrank by a nearly an eighth of its size, from 231.7 to 203 square kilometers (89.5 to 78.4 square miles).The main cause for that loss up until 2007 was land conversion for palm oil plantations, affecting primarily non-mangroves areas. After 2007, the rate of habitat loss due to plantation development slowed down substantially because of a scarcity of suitable land. What followed instead was a boom in the palm oil processing industry, represented by a slate of bulking stations, refineries and biodiesel plants that are already operating or under construction.“Once most of the suitable land was converted to plantations, the subsequent industrial expansion became the most considerable threat to proboscis monkeys in Balikpapan Bay,” the report says.The industry flourished in Balikpapan, one of the largest cities in Indonesian Borneo and home to a bustling port that can accommodate palm oil bulk carriers.Deforestation for oil palm in East Kalimantan, Indonesia in 2016. Photo courtesy of Linus.Different kind of habitat lossThe nature of habitat loss brought about by the palm oil processing industry is vastly different from that associated with oil palm plantations.For one, industrial expansion leads to loss of both mangrove and non-mangrove forests. And it tends to cause widely scattered deforestation because of the need to build expanded infrastructure, such as ports, power lines and, in particular, roads.That translates into not just loss of habitat for the proboscis monkey, but also fragmentation of its remaining populations and the attendant impacts, including loss of access to food resources.The study cites the case of the Somber River, located right next to the city of Balikpapan. The river is a non-mangrove area where the proboscis monkey lives. But it has been highly degraded, with many of the native Sonneratia alba mangrove trees dead.The report describes the situation along the Somber River as “rather alarming,” given that the mangrove trees represent the single main food resource for the monkeys living in the highly fragmented habitat.“Instead of the total habitat, the availability and access to key food resources may determine the future development of the population,” the study says.Proboscis monkeys grooming. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.RSPO-certified habitat clearingEven as it’s been overtaken by industrial expansion as the main cause of the loss of proboscis monkey habitat, clearing of land for oil palm plantations continues to be a major problem, the study says.And third-party “sustainability” certification isn’t a check on the problem: most of the companies responsible for the loss of monkey habitat in Balikpapan Bay are members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). In fact, all of the concessions managed by RSPO members continued clearing land after 2005, according to the study.The study cites the case of RSPO member Goodhope Asia Holdings Ltd., whose local joint venture, PT AIEK-Goodhope Asia Holdings Ltd., reportedly cleared 8.96 km2 (3.46 mi2) of non-mangrove proboscis monkey habitat for plantations. The study authors described the company as “the most prominent single stakeholder responsible for proboscis monkey habitat loss in Balikpapan Bay.”Findings like these call into question the effectiveness of the RSPO as a check on the environmental destruction associated with the palm oil industry, given that habitat clearance constitutes a violation of the RSPO Principles and Criteria. Under those rules, all proboscis monkey habitats are classified as a high conservation value (HCV) forest because of the presence of rare, threatened or endangered species.“It does not seem that the membership in RSPO plays a major role in halting the forest loss in either plantation or industrial concessions,” the study says.But it also says that the destroyed habitat can still be rehabilitated, including the land cleared by PT AIEK-Goodhope Asia Holdings Ltd.“If the corporation decides, either voluntarily or under pressure by RSPO, to restore this habitat, they would instantly turn from a major destroyer to a pioneer in proboscis monkey conservation in Balikpapan Bay,” the study says.In response to the findings, the RSPO confirmed that Goodhope was one of its members and that its local venture partner, PT AIEK, was not certified.“Additionally, we found that no formal complaints have been lodged through RSPO’s Complaints and Appeals system against PT AIEK, nor its parent company,” the RSPO told Mongabay.But even without a complaint being lodged, the RSPO said all its members were expected to abide by its rules, regardless of whether or not they were certified.Proboscis monkey. Image by Rhett Butler/MongabayFurther threatsRealistically, though, the rate of habitat loss looks to increase in the coming years, with the government planning major projects to turn the area into an industrial powerhouse. These include plans like an extension of the Kariangau industrial park, which would involve large-scale clearing of coastal forests.Under Balikpapan’s latest municipal zoning plans, non-mangrove forests within the industrial park have been allocated for industry, with the mangrove forests untouched. Activists have criticized the expansion plan, saying it could lead to further loss of habitat for numerous species, including the proboscis monkey.The government also plans to develop another industrial estate in the neighboring district of North Penajam Paser, which will overlap with a large area of existing proboscis monkey habitat.Another part of North Penajam Paser will also be home to Indonesia’s new capital city, which President Joko Widodo announced last year would be relocated from the chronically congested and fast-sinking Jakarta. Environmental activists have voiced concerns that the relocation and attendant construction boom will spell doom for several endemic species, including the proboscis monkey. The new study also raises this point, saying that the move “is likely to result in the next dramatic change in the rate and causation of the proboscis monkey habitat loss in Balikpapan Bay.”President Widodo claims the new capital will be designed in such a way to minimize disruptions to the proboscis monkey, while the minister of public works, Basuki Hadi Moeljono, has promised to review the infrastructure development plan to protect the species.The initial plan was to build transportation infrastructure in Balikpapan Bay to channel construction supplies inland to the new capital. But after learning that Balikpapan Bay is a natural habitat of the proboscis monkey, Basuki said he changed the plan.“[The habitat] can’t be touched,” he told local media. “[We] have to build the connectivity first.”Citation:Toulec, T., Lhota, S., Soumarová, H., Putera, A. K. S., & Kustiawan, W. (2020). Shrimp farms, fire or palm oil? Changing causes of proboscis monkey habitat loss. Global Ecology and Conservation, 21. doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2019.e00863center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Family appeal to find two much loved family goats

first_imgUPDATE : The two goats have been found and are home safely. Thanks to all who shared this post.An appeal has been launched to find two small pygmy goats that have gone missing from the Termon area on Wednesday. The family pets of two young boys are keen to see them returned home safely. The family-owners fear the two could have been stolen.A reward has been offered for their safe return.If you have any information on the missing pair you can contact Kevin McCafferty on Facebook.  Family appeal to find two much loved family goats was last modified: July 10th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Cheers! Donegal bar scoops Irish Pub Award

first_imgCelebrations are underway for The Rusty Mackerel pub after their victory in the Irish Pub of the Year Awards.The South Donegal pub scooped the Best Newcomer award in the 2019 awards, which are hosted by Vintners Federation of Ireland (VFI) and The Licenced Vintners Association (LVA).The Rusty Mackerel in Teelin is a popular stop for locals and tourists alike who enjoy the traditional Irish pub atmosphere near Sliabh Liag. The Rusty Mackerel – TeelinThis year over 1,700 applications were made to the Irish Pub Awards. Paris Texas in Kilkenny was named National Pub of the Year.Speaking at the Irish Pub Awards: Padraic McGann, VFI President said: “All winners faced very stiff competition to reach the final.  Irish pubs are the hub of any community – a warm destination to meet friends where they can enjoy good food and drink, music and entertainment and where tourists can mingle with locals to experience an Irish atmosphere at its best.  These awards reflect the high quality of our pubs across Ireland, their ongoing investment in raising standards and their importance as community centres,” he said.   Cheers! Donegal bar scoops Irish Pub Award was last modified: November 25th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Source: Giants meet with Bryce Harper, Scott Boras again in Las Vegas

first_imgSCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–The San Francisco Giants stepped up their pursuit of free agent outfielder Bryce Harper with another meeting in Las Vegas Tuesday, according to multiple sources.Giants CEO Larry Baer and president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi were in Las Vegas, Harper’s hometown, to meet with the coveted free agent and agent Scott Boras for a second time in a matter of weeks.CLICK HERE if you are having trouble viewing the gallery on your mobile device.The Giants met with Harper and …last_img read more