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‘Extremely rare’ fossil tooth of hamster-sized monkey found in Peru

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Environment, Forests, Fossils, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Monkeys, New Species, Paleontology, Primates, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery center_img From the riverbed of the Río Alto Madre de Dios in southeastern Peru, researchers have found an extremely small tooth that belonged to a species of tiny monkey that lived some 18 million years ago.Researchers have named the new species of extinct monkey Parvimico materdei, with parvimico meaning tiny monkey and the species name referring to the river where the fossil tooth was found.From the tooth, the researchers have deduced that the monkey was exceptionally small, in the size range of marmosets and tamarins, and likely ate a mix of insects and fruits.Given how the monkey fossil record for the period between 13 million and 31 million years ago from South America is extremely scarce, creating a gap in the understanding of the evolution of New World monkeys, the discovery of P. materdei is incredibly exciting, researchers say. In 2016, researchers digging along the Río Alto Madre de Dios in the Peruvian Amazon uncovered hundreds of fossils of rodents, bats and other animals. Among the fossils was an extremely small tooth, “double the size of the head of a pin,” said Richard Kay, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University. This upper molar, Kay and his colleagues write in a new study, belonged to a species of tiny monkey no heavier than a hamster that lived in the region some 18 million years ago.When the researchers first saw the tooth among the fossil collection, they immediately knew they were looking at something special.“Monkey teeth are very diagnostic,” Kay, the lead author of the study, told Mongabay. “The team was very excited because these specimens are extremely rare.”Kay and his colleagues have named the new species of extinct monkey Parvimico materdei, with parvimico meaning tiny monkey and the species name referring to the Río Alto Madre de Dios, on the banks of which the team discovered the fossil. The fossil tooth has now been stored in the collections of the Institute of Paleontology at Peru’s National University of Piura.A 3D scan of the fossilized tooth found in Peru’s Amazon jungle. Image by Duke SMIF.A single, small tooth can’t reveal a whole lot. But to paleontologists, the size and shape of the tooth, how worn it is, and where it was found, can say a few things about what the animal may have been like.“The tooth’s crown is very well preserved and from the wear in life we can infer that it was a young individual,” Kay said in an email.The researchers have also concluded that P. materdei “was an exceptionally small monkey, in the size range of marmosets and tamarins.” The monkey also likely ate a mix of insects and fruits, the researchers say, based on the tooth’s structure.“Very small living Amazon monkeys (especially the marmosets) feed mostly on a mix of fruit and tree exudates (gum),” Kay said. “Parvimico lacks the gum component in its diet.“We can say nothing more reliably about its social habits or mode of locomotion, although tree living is probable because all known South American monkeys are arboreal,” he added.A tiny tooth may not seem like much. But fossil records of primates from South America are rare, which means that even a fossil tooth is a big deal. In fact, P. materdei is the first named Early Miocene primate from the Amazon Basin, the researchers write in the paper.The rarity of primate fossils in South America is “because the overall biomass of South American monkeys is very low compared with that of small rodents (of which we have many specimens) and marsupials,” Kay said. “Also, monkeys have long life spans and slow reproductive rates compared with rodents of similar size, so the rate of turnover is slower.”Given how scarce primate fossils from the region are, P. materdei fills a gap in understanding the evolution of New World monkeys.Researchers posit that monkeys reached South America from Africa some 40 million years ago. In South America, they diversified into the more than 150 species of New World monkeys known today, most of them living in the Amazon rainforest. However, the monkey fossil record for the period between 13 million and 31 million years ago from the region is extremely scant, and includes just a few fragments of teeth and jaws.P. materdei dates back 17 million to 19 million years, placing it “smack dab in the time and place when we would have expected diversification to have occurred in the New World monkeys,” Kay said in a statement.In fact, sediments on the banks of the Río Alto Madre de Dios are rich in fossils and are helping Kay’s team reconstruct what life was like in the Amazon 18 million years ago. The location is especially important to retrace the evolution of primates.“The proximity to the Andes is the key,” Kay said. “As the Andes rose through the Cenozoic, the adjacent originally flat-lying sediments in the piedmont region were folded, then eroded flat. Rivers crosscut the ancient sediments bringing the rock units to the surface. By contrast in the central Amazon basin, the older sediments are still deeply buried. The few other geologically old primate specimens recovered, of which there are only 4 or 5 teeth, share the same proximity to the Andes.”Sediments along the Río Alto Madre de Dios in southern Peru are rich in fossils. Image by Wout Salenbien/Duke University.Citation:Kay, R. F., Gonzales, L. A., Salenbien, W., Martinez, J. N., Cooke, S. B., Valdivia, L. A., … & Baker, P. A. (2019). Parvimico materdei gen. et sp. nov.: A new platyrrhine from the Early Miocene of the Amazon Basin, Peru. Journal of Human Evolution, 134, 102628. doi: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2019.05.016last_img read more

Audio: Ami Vitale on how meeting Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, changed her life

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bears, Elephants, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Indigenous Peoples, Photography, Podcast, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Ami Vitale, a photographer for National Geographic who documented the death of the last male northern white rhino, Sudan.As celebrated as her nature and wildlife photography is, Vitale started off as a war zone photographer. She came to realize that humanity’s strained relationship with the natural world was behind each of the human conflicts she covered, however, and then, when she first met Sudan in 2009, she was moved to focus on nature photography.On today’s episode, Vitale tells us about how meeting Sudan changed her life and discusses a few more of the stories she’s documented throughout her highly decorated career, including China’s efforts to rehab its panda population and the wildlife sanctuary in Kenya that rescues orphaned elephants and helps them return to the wild. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Ami Vitale, a photographer for National Geographic who documented the death of the last male northern white rhino, Sudan.Listen here: Ami Vitale’s work for National Geographic magazine and many other publications has taken her to over 100 countries and won her numerous awards. She’s been named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographer’s Association, received the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting, and won five prizes from World Press Photos, including 1st Prize for her story about the first ever community owned and operated elephant sanctuary in Africa. She was even named one of 50 Badass Women by Instyle Magazine along with the likes of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Madeleine Albright, and former Mongabay Newscast guests Jane Goodall and Margaret Atwood.As celebrated as her nature and wildlife photography is, however, Vitale started off as a war zone photographer. She came to realize that humanity’s strained relationship with the natural world was behind each of the human conflicts she covered, however, and then, when she first met Sudan in 2009, she was moved to focus on nature photography.On today’s episode, Vitale tells us about how meeting Sudan changed her life and discusses a few more of the stories she’s documented throughout her highly decorated career, including China’s efforts to rehab its panda population and the wildlife sanctuary in Kenya that rescues orphaned elephants and helps them return to the wild.Here’s this episode’s top news:Study declares ancient Chinese paddlefish extinct‘Tainted timber’ from Myanmar widely used in yachts seized in the NetherlandsNew monkey discovered on “island” amid deforestation in BrazilAmi Vitale. Photo courtesy of Ami Vitale.A panda keeper does a health check on the cub of giant panda Xi Mei at the Wolong Nature Reserve managed by the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda in Sichuan province, China. October 31, 2015. Photo by Ami Vitale.Joseph Wachira saying goodbye to Sudan. Photo by Ami Vitale.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

LOCAL NEWS: AIDAN GUTHRIE’S DRUMKEEN COMMUNITY NOTES

first_imgSenior Citizens Christmas Dinner PartyThe annual St. Vincent De Paul dinner party will take place on Sun 02nd Dec with Mass at 6pm in St. Patrick’s Church, followed by a meal and music in the hall. To book contact Mathew O’ Kane on 074 9134104 or Michael Mc Namee on 074 9134163.Drumkeen Youth Club Youth Club this Fri 30th Nov back to its usual slot of 7:30-9:30pm. Thanks to everyone who bought/sold our Christmas draw tickets, the draw takes place on 12th Dec and all winners will be published in the notes.DATE FOR YOUR DAIRY: We are having our “BIG CHRISTMAS DISCO” on Sat 15th Dec in the hall from 4:30-6:00pm. All welcome, lots of games and fun things to do, Adm €3, more details next week.Finn Valley AC Jogging GroupThe Finn Valley AC has recently established a Jogging Group which meets every Monday night in Convoy opposite Breen’s Bar @ 7p.m.!All welcome! Drumkeen Old School ReunionTickets are now available for The Drumkeen Old School Reunion dinner dance which will take place on 04th Aug. 2013 in Jackson’s Hotel, Ballybofey, so if you’re looking for a Christmas present for your Mum, Dad, grandparents, brother or sister, then why not treat them to a ticket to the biggest event of 2013. You could also make it a family reunion and book a table for all your kin folk. Tables of 8 and 10 available. Contact Josie 0872168176, Maeve 086 3940761, Andrena 087 1369788, John 0857538575 or Henry on 087 2914267 for details.Charlie Daly & H-Block Martyrs Sinn Féin Cumann DrumkeenLotto Results 21st Nov 02, 04, 19, 21. No jackpot winner 1 Match 3Numbers €100 Cathal Mc Connell, Dunfanaghy. Next weeks jackpot €3,650 Tickets from any committee member €2. Go raibh maith agat.FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP for Letterkenny & StranorlarThere will be no meetings for the above group in December or January (but present members are welcomed to attend the Group Christmas Dinner at Villa Rose, Ballybofey on Friday 7th December by confirming your name with Jude)Meetings will resume in February – 1st Wednesday of each month in St. Conals, Letterkenny 7pm to 8.30pm and 1st Friday each month in Millbrae Health Centre, Stranorlar 6.30 to 8.30pm. New members welcome. If you would like further information on the group or the condition, please feel free to contact the following : Jude Fibromyalgia Bromley on Facebook [email protected] or 086 3945008 (after 7pm)Tyrconnel Martyrs Flute BandBand Practice this Tue 27th in the hall @ 7.00pm. all new members welcome. Age 11 to 91 years. We’ll teach you to play the flute or drum and have some fun!!Slimming WorldSlimming World meet every Tuesday in Kees Hotel, Stranorlar at 10am, 12 noon, 5.30pm & 7.30pm.  New members always welcome. Contact Catherine on 0863962666 for further information.Parish HallAnyone wishing to book the hall should contact Charlie Quinn on91/34010 or 087 7728608LOCAL NEWS: AIDAN GUTHRIE’S DRUMKEEN COMMUNITY NOTES was last modified: November 25th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:LOCAL NEWS: AIDAN GUTHRIE’S DRUMKEEN COMMUNITY NOTESlast_img read more

Hendo Unchained: Liverpool’s dogged captain takes centre stage in title race

first_imgReuse this content Then Mohamed Salah made an incursion and was checked. Never fear: there was Henderson bounding up in support. His first touch took him into space and the Kop bayed for him to shoot: no deft stuff, Hendo, please! But he didn’t. His second touch, at pace, was weighted perfectly to take him to the byline but not beyond, and his third chipped the ball to the back post where Sadio Mané couldn’t miss. The 6 has become an 8 and, for a third successive fixture, he unlocked the game. It was a moment of pure, distilled Henderson: an assist seeded in his enthusiasm but brought to fruition by a level of skill and technical control that often seems underestimated.Two years ago the German photographer Christian Vieler brought out a book comprising studio shots of dogs as they tried to catch a chewy treat he tossed for them. Look at those pictures and look at Henderson under a high ball. The expression is the same. The same focus, the same desire, the same sheer wonderment to be alive in a universe in which such delights can drop from the sky.In part, Henderson’s reputation has suffered because of his loyalty and his willingness to do what his master commands. When he first emerged at Sunderland, he was a right-winger. Steve Bruce soon moved him into the centre but in his first game there, away at Birmingham, he was dreadful. Bruce kept faith and, marvelling at his willingness to learn, was vindicated as within a matter of weeks Henderson had established himself as a box-to-box player.When Fabio Capello gave him his first England cap, in a 2-1 home defeat against France in November 2010, though, it was as a holder just in front of the back four. Henderson was awful but the decision to play him there, a role he had never occupied, was mystifying. Henderson, though, overcame the setback and, given Harry Kane’s injury, could end up captaining England into the Nations League semi-final.Signed for Liverpool as part of some misguided moneyballing under Kenny Dalglish, Henderson was very nearly sold by Brendan Rodgers. But he kept going and prevailed, because that is what he does. Jürgen Klopp needed him to operate as the deepest-lying midfielder – as what German football refers to as a 6, a convention Henderson, ever the diligent student, seems willingly to have adopted. England Henderson did the job willingly enough, but it is not a assignment at which he excels. He does not have the instinctive positional sense of a Claude Makélélé or an Andrea Pirlo, a Sergio Busquets or a Xabi Alonso. When Liverpool pressed hard and constantly, his energy meant he could get away with it: pace and aggression were prioritised above precision. But this season, as Liverpool’s approach has become slightly more conservative, those tactical failings have been exposed. So Henderson, out of favour, his frustration apparent as he pointedly ignored Klopp on being substituted at Old Trafford in February, suggested he might be better on the right of the three, as an 8.That is what he loves, being let off the leash so – eyes bright, tongue lolling, ears flapping, drool flying from his jowls – he can go chasing rabbits and smells and squirrels and, yes, balls wherever his enthusiasm may take him. As Alex Ferguson once noted, there is something slightly odd about Henderson’s gait, which perhaps means he will never be the most graceful of players, that his mistakes will stand out and even his moments of genius can appear a little clumsy, but look at his impact.Henderson came off the bench to turn the game at Southampton. It was his through-ball that cracked Porto open in the Champions League last Tuesday. It was his intervention that opened up Chelsea. He was relegated to the bench for England’s last game as well, but came on against Montenegro in that No 8 role to create the fourth and fifth goals with quick forward passes.The result has been Hendo Unchained, and it may end up bringing Liverpool the title. Liverpool Read more Hide Read more Liverpool 2-0 Chelsea: Premier League player ratings Was this helpful? Topics Share on LinkedIn Liverpool (85 points)21 Apr Cardiff (a) 26 Apr Huddersfield (h)5 May Newcastle (a) 12 May Wolves (h) Sportblog One of the hallmarks of great drama is when a previously unheralded character turns out to have a significant impact on the denouement that, in hindsight, seems inevitable. (Gendry? Samwell Tarly, perhaps? Or maybe one of the surviving direwolves?) Jordan Henderson may be Liverpool captain but, a fortnight ago, who really thought he might have a major say in the playing out of the title race – and that it would be positive?Liverpool were not nervous exactly but five minutes into the second half against Chelsea on Sunday they were perhaps just at the stage of thinking they needed a goal soon or they would start to become anxious. Manchester City’s victory against Crystal Palace meant they had to win, but playing into the wind howling over the Anfield Road End they had struggled for rhythm in the first half.center_img Manchester City (86 points)24 Apr Man Utd (a)28 Apr Burnley (a)4 May Leicester (h)12 May Brighton (a) Show Chelsea Share on WhatsApp features Share via Email Quick guide Premier League title race: the remaining fixtures Share on Facebook Thank you for your feedback. Share on Pinterest Jürgen Klopp ‘blown away’ by Mohamed Salah’s thunderbolt against Chelsea Share on Messenger Share on Twitterlast_img read more