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H.A House / Nguyen Khai Architects & Associates

first_img Area:  75 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Nguyen Quang Khai CopyHouses•Huế, Vietnam 2018 Save this picture!© Trieu Chien+ 46Curated by Paula Pintos Share Projects Manufacturers: Panasonic, Toto, Philips Electronics, Xingfa Aluminium CopyAbout this officeNguyen Khai Architects & AssociatesOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHuếOn FacebookVietnamPublished on December 17, 2019Cite: “H.A House / Nguyen Khai Architects & Associates” 17 Dec 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – CopperIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsPure + FreeFormCustom Metal Cladding – Legacy Fund 1 BuildingWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodWood Fiber Partition Walls – ValchromatDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaSkylightsFAKROEnergy-efficient roof window FTT ThermoToilets / BidetsBritexToilets – Accessible Centurion PanMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream “COPY” H.A House / Nguyen Khai Architects & AssociatesSave this projectSaveH.A House / Nguyen Khai Architects & Associates H.A House / Nguyen Khai Architects & Associates ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/930260/ha-house-nguyen-khai-architects-and-associates Clipboard Vietnam Year:  Photographs:  Trieu Chien Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Houses Architects: Nguyen Khai Architects & Associates Area Area of this architecture project ArchDaily “COPY” Design Team:Tran Yen ChauCity:HuếCountry:VietnamMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Trieu ChienRecommended ProductsWindowsKalwall®Facades – Window ReplacementsDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityText description provided by the architects. Hue, a city in the middle of Vietnam, is where the intense year-round sunlight and heavy rain are among its unique charm. The weather is one of many reasons leading to the well-known architectural style called “Hue garden house.” However, the residential area is becoming smaller and more expensive than ever due to the high speed of urbanism along with the increasing demand for construction in new planning areas. The typical townhouse, therefore, becomes the best choice for many people despite its poor condition of natural light and ventilation, the deficiency of indoor-nature, and the lack of connection space for its members. To solve these problems, H.A House was born.Save this picture!© Trieu ChienSave this picture!© Trieu ChienH.A House is located in the new urban area, with 5m in width and 21m in length. It is designed for a married couple and two kids, who wish to live in a house full of light, wind, and trees. The design of the house focuses on creating continuous open spaces. Walls are replaced by doors that can fold and slide to their maximum. The split-level floors create different air pressure and optimize the ventilation process. Besides, all the bathrooms and the storage room are moved to the west side of the house to help prevent heat radiation. With the efficient management of space, materials, energy, and natural elements, artificial equipment becomes unnecessary.Save this picture!© Trieu ChienSave this picture!SectionSave this picture!PlanTo reduce intense sunlight and improve ventilation, trees are grown vertically in random empty blocks of the west-side wall, on the rooftop, in front of, or behind the house. The presence of trees in and outside the house creates a peaceful atmosphere and a connection to nature. It allows the residents some moments to balance the material and spiritual life.Save this picture!© Trieu ChienProject gallerySee allShow lessNine Hours Capsule Hotel / Naruse Inokuma ArchitectsSelected ProjectsHohohot East Coach Hub Terminal / CSADI A2 StudioSelected Projects Share Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/930260/ha-house-nguyen-khai-architects-and-associates Clipboard Lead Architect: last_img read more

Farming Today for Tomorrow

first_img Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Farming Today for Tomorrow Audio Playerhttps://hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/farming-today-for-tomorrow-wrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“Farming Today for Tomorrow”- that’s the name of the new multimedia campaign from the National Pork Producers Council to showcase U.S. pork producers’ long-standing commitment to environmental stewardship and further reducing greenhouse gas emissions.Duane Stateler is a hog farmer from McComb, Ohio featured in the campaign who says, “They’re not making any more ground, so we’ve got to preserve what we’ve got. It was always taught to me by my dad and my grandfather that you’ve got to be careful with what you do out here because remember we’re drinking the water that comes from the area that we’re farming, a lot of our farm wells. So, we’ve got to pay particular attention to what we do that we make sure we have quality water for not only ourselves, but for other people.”One of the top priorities of the incoming Biden administration is addressing climate. Stateler says this shouldn’t be a concern for farmers, but instead an opportunity to tell the great story that farmers have.“I think that there’s no better no better stewards of the land and of the natural resources than what farmers are. I mean, as you look to where we’re progressing, the amount of soil testing is up, and the response to what we’re putting on is up. And it it’s a two-fold, let’s be honest. There is economics involved in it. But with the margins being at where they’re at and the fact that we’ve got to preserve what we’ve got, I think the sustainability aspect of what farmers do is not understood well enough, and we’ve got to do a little bit better job of letting people know what we are doing in today’s modern agriculture.”Thanks to environmental stewardship efforts, U.S. pork producers have reduced their emissions to 0.4 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, according to 2019 Environmental Protection Agency data. Hog farmers are committed to further reducing their environmental footprint, including support for voluntary, incentive-based tools to maximize the sequestration of carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions.To learn more about NPPC’s “Farming Today for Tomorrow” campaign, visit: www.nppc.org/farmingtodayfortomorrow. SHARE By Eric Pfeiffer – Jan 17, 2021 SHARE Previous articleHoosier Ag This Week Podcast for 1-16-21Next articlePoeschl Resigns as CEO of National FFA Organization Eric Pfeiffer Facebook Twitter Farming Today for Tomorrowlast_img read more

Saudi Aramco to boost output regardless of huge profit drop

first_imgChief executive officer (CEO) of Saudi Arabian oil and gas giant Saudi Aramco has stated that the company would be pressing ahead with its plan to boost output capacity regardless of massive profit drop in 2Q 2020. It is worth noting that Saudi Aramco reported a 73 per cent fall in its second-quarter profit, as lockdowns to contain the coronavirus reduced oil consumption and sent prices crashing to levels not seen in nearly two decades and WTI to negative prices. Saudi Aramco’s previouscapital spending guidance was $40 billion to $45 billion. “We are proceeding with increasing our maximum sustainable capacity from 12 to 13 million barrels”, Nasser said. According to the Saudi Aramco CEO, it should not have a major impact on capital in 2021. “[…] we delivered solid earnings because of our low production costs, unique scale, agile workforce, and unrivalled financial and operational strength. This helped us deliver on our plan to maintain a second-quarter dividend of $18.75 billion to be paid in the third quarter. “We are determined to emerge from the pandemic stronger and will continue making progress on our long-term strategic journey, through ongoing investments in our business – which has one of the lowest upstream carbon footprints in the world”, Nasser stated in the financial report. The company reported a profitof $6.5 billion in the second quarter of 2020 which is a massive drop from the $24.68billion in the same quarter last year.center_img “We are seeing a partial recovery in the energy market as countries around the world take steps to ease restrictions and reboot their economies. Meanwhile, we continue to place people’s safety first and have adapted to the new normal, implementing wide-ranging precautions to limit the spread of COVID-19 wherever we operate. As previously mentioned,the profit fell due to the price of oil during the quarter. Namely, the averagerealized crude oil price for the quarter was $23.4 per barrel while last years quarterhad an average realized crude oil price of $68.4 per barrel. Aramco’s capital spending plan for 2021 will be “significantly lower than previous guidance”, CEO Amin Nasser stated in a call with analysts and investors after the company’s second-quarter results. In the second-quarter report, the company said that it expected capital expenditure for 2020 to be at the lower end of a $25 billion to $30 billion range. According to an articleby Reuters, Saudi Aramco is moving ahead with plans to boost crude outputcapacity by 1 million barrels per day (bpd) to 13 million bpd despite cuts incapital expenditure this year and next year.last_img read more

Angola pledges $60m to fund landmine clearance in national parks

first_imgThe Angolan government has announced a $60 million commitment to clear landmines in Luengue-Luiana and Mavinga national parks in the country’s southeast.The region is part of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area — home to incredible natural biodiversity, but also one of the most heavily mined regions of Angola.International funding for landmine clearance has fallen by 80 percent over the last 10 years, and without new funding Angola will miss its target of clearing all landmines by 2025.The HALO Trust, a demining NGO, and the Angolan government hope that clearance of landmines will stimulate conservation in southeastern Angola and provide alternative livelihoods such as ecotourism to alleviate poverty and diversify the country’s economy away from oil. The Angolan government has pledged $60 million to clear landmines in two national parks that form part of southern Africa’s highly biodiverse Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area.The country’s environment minister, Paula Coelho, made the announcement June 17 at a conference in London. The government has contracted the U.K.- and U.S.-based HALO Trust to clear 153 minefields in Luengue-Luiana and Mavinga national parks in the country’s southeastern province of Cuando Cubango.“We are enthusiastic to be part of the initiative of the protection of the elephant and to develop long-term plans for protected areas,” Coelho told the conference.Paula Coelho, Angolan Minister for the Environment, announces a $60 million commitment by the Angolan government to mine clearance at a conference at Chatham House in London. Image courtesy of the HALO TrustAngola’s wildlife was decimated during 41 years of conflict — a 14-year struggle for independence followed by 27 years of civil war — that finally ended in 2002. In southeastern Angola, displaced civilians hunted wildlife to survive, while the UNITA faction, a belligerent in both conflicts, slaughtered elephants and sold the ivory, with the backing of the apartheid government in South Africa, to buy arms.From 2004 to 2005, following the end of the civil war, aerial surveys by Michael Chase, a conservation researcher and founder of the South Africa-based group Elephants Without Borders, found signs that the elephant population in Luiana was increasing; at the same time, tracking of elephants tagged with collars in neighboring Botswana and Namibia showed they were returning to their former range in this part of Angola.The Angolan government didn’t allow any further studies until 2015, when Chase returned as part of the Great Elephant Census. The Angolan portion of the census counted 3,400 elephants and an alarming carcass ratio of 30 percent, indicating threatening levels of poaching.The civil war that followed Angolan independence was one of the many proxy battles of the Cold War, with UNITA backed by U.S. allies, and its main rival, the People’s Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), supported by the Soviets. As financial and military aid poured into the country, large amounts of ivory and rhinoceros horn were flowing out, according to a 1996 South African government inquiry. Vast numbers of landmines were laid: a 1997 report by Human Rights Watch found that 51 different types of mines, manufactured in 18 different countries, had been found in Angolan soil. Southeastern Angola saw the heaviest fighting during the civil war: in Cuando Cubango province alone there are 22 square kilometers (8.5 square miles) of confirmed minefields.Seventeen years after the end of the war, landmines continue to restrict access to farmland across this part of the country, making it difficult for the government to extend development here, and deterring would-be ecotourists while at the same time creating ideal conditions for poachers, for whom the rewards offered by wildlife trafficking syndicates make the risk worthwhile.“The land mine issue is something that is very important to remove because we [need] our economic development,” said Rui Mangueira, the Angolan ambassador to the U.K. “Angola could be one of the most beautiful destinations.”Conservation, development and landmines: Interconnected issuesThe southeastern corner of Angola is a vital piece of the 520,000-square-kilometer (201,000-square-mile) Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA), which includes both formal wildlife refuges and communally held land with rapidly growing populations. KAZA was set up in 2011 to manage this vast cross-border area with conservation as the primary form of land use, developing it as a sustainable tourism destination to benefit its resident communities while allowing wildlife, including megafauna such as the African elephant, to roam freely across historical ranges regardless of national borders.Clearing mines from the Angolan section of the KAZA transfrontier area is crucial to allowing wildlife like this elephant to roam freely across borders. Photo: YoungRobV/Flickr CC NC by 2.0In 2015, scientists returned to the region to explore the headwaters of the Okavango Delta, the largest freshwater wetland in southern Africa, as part of the National Geographic Society’s Okavango Wilderness Project. Navigating between the minefields with support from the HALO Trust, the team found a wealth of biodiversity, including more than 80 species new to science; to date, only 11 of them have been formally described.Also speaking at the London conference, Kai Collins, director of the Okavango Wilderness Project, described the difficulty of operating in the region: “We couldn’t even get the teams in to start the expedition … without the assistance of HALO guiding us through the most heavily mined areas.”“There is also a poverty that rises directly from the presence of these hundreds of minefields,” said James Cowan, CEO of the HALO Trust. “The communities that live in these areas cannot develop economically and become reliant on poaching and bush meat.”Clearing landmines: A mammoth taskAngola has set a target of clearing all landmines from its territory by 2025. The national mine action agency, Comissão Nacional Intersectorial de Desminagem e Assistência Humanitária (CNIDAH), has cleared 56 percent of Angola’s known minefields to date. CNIDAH’s clearance work has been supported by international groups including the Mines Advisory Group, Norwegian People’s Aid and the HALO Trust, and has been heavily reliant on foreign donors.But international funding for mine clearance in Angola has fallen drastically in recent years, from $48.1 million in 2005 to just $3.1 million in 2017. This fall was in part caused by a brief period when Angola reached middle-income status due to a rise in the price of oil, its main export. The loss of international funding has been compounded by a downturn in Angola’s economy; at current rates, Angola won’t achieve its mine-free vision until 2046.The Angolan government hopes that ecotourism in areas like Cuando Cubango can help diversify its economy, as it has in neighbouring countries like Botswana. “The Angolan government knows it needs to diversify beyond oil,” Coelho said at the conference. “Angola knows it needs outside expertise and investment to help preserve its environment.”Collins said he hopes the demining work can bring about change in southeastern Angola. “The opportunity is there of wildlife populations that just need to recover and be protected from poaching,” he said.The Okavango Wilderness Project is looking at ways to create a “conservation economy” in the hope that as local people gain access to sustainable farming practices and alternative livelihoods through ecotourism, poaching and hunting for bushmeat will decrease.The Angolan section of KAZA is also crucially important to the wider vision of an area where wildlife can roam freely across borders. In neighboring countries, instances of human-wildlife conflict are increasing as animal populations recover. KAZA’s supporters hope that a landmine-free Angola could offer important additional space for wildlife to disperse.“Elephants, they do not recognize borders, they do not have passports but move freely,” Coelho said. “I would like to … open the corridors so that the pressure in the [southern African] region can be less and elephants can return home.”Banner image: HALO Trust operatives clearing land mines in Angola. Image courtesy of the HALO TrustFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by terna gyusecenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Migration, Monitoring, Poachers, Poaching, Research, surveys, Tagging, Wildlife last_img read more

Deforestation drops in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, but risks remain: experts

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Conservation, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Tropical Deforestation, Zero Deforestation Commitments Article published by Karla Mendes Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A joint report from the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and NGO Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica based on satellite imaging shows an annual reduction of 9.3 percent in deforested areas in the Mata Atlântica, the country’s most endangered biome.The cleared area in 17 Atlantic Forest states between October 2017 and April 2018 totaled 11,399 hectares (28,167 acres), which is 1,163 hectares (2,874 acres) less than over the same period a year earlier.However, intense pressure from agribusiness and the real estate market continues placing the Mata Atlântica’s ecosystems under threat, risks that include ongoing deforestation, losses in biodiversity, and potential extinction of species, experts warn. Deforested areas in Brazil’s most imperiled biome, the Mata Atlântica, were reduced by 9.3 percent from October 2017 to April 2018, compared year-to-year, according to a joint report from the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica, an NGO.While this is good news, intense pressure from agribusiness and the real estate market continues to place Mata Atlântica ecosystems under increasing threat, with ongoing risks that include deforestation, biodiversity losses, and possible extinction of species, experts said.No large tropical forest ecosystem has suffered as much loss as the Mata Atlântica, also known as the Atlantic Forest. Encompassing a variety of tropical forest habitats — ranging from dry forests to moist forests to coastal mangroves — the Mata Atlântica once stretched up-and-down Brazil’s coastline, and covered parts of Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. Today, it survives largely in small degraded patches and protected areas.In the 2017-2018 period, an area of the biome totaling 11,399 hectares (28,167 acres) was cleared in 17 Brazilian states, which is 1,163 hectares (2,874 acres) less than the 12,562 hectares (31,041 acres) of deforestation recorded a year earlier, the report said.The data is based on the analysis of 87 percent of the approximately 131.03 million hectare (32.38 million acre) total area of the Mata Atlântica biome. The report explained that 10 percent was only partially evaluated due to cloud cover, while 3 percent could not be assessed due to unavailability of images.Forest losses weren’t evenly distributed throughout the biome, with just four Brazilian states accounting for more than 80 percent of cleared areas in the Mata Atlântica. The Southeastern state of Minas Gerais accounted for the biggest deforested area: 3,379 hectares (8,350 acres), followed by the Northeastern state of Piauí with 2,100 hectares (5,189 acres), the Southern state of Paraná with 2,049 hectares (5,063 acres), and the Northeastern state of Bahia with 1,985 hectares (4,905 acres).This Envisat satellite image shows a portion of three Brazilian states along the Atlantic coast: Rio de Janeiro, Espírito Santo and southern Bahia. To the south, clouds cover the country’s second largest city, Rio de Janeiro. Much of the area pictured was covered by the Atlantic Forest, or Mata Atlântica, a region containing a diverse and unique mix of vegetation and forest types. It is one of the most threatened biomes on Earth. Image courtesy of European Space Agency CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO.Atlantic Forest under pressureWhile logging and conversion of native vegetation for croplands and cattle pastures have been the primary drivers of Mata Atlântica deforestation for centuries, the real estate market and “authorized” deforestation are now also reducing the number of trees in urban areas, mostly in the Southeastern region, said Mario Mantovani, director of public policies at Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica, an NGO.“There is a lot of pressure on Mata Atlântica’s remaining areas in big cities and metropolitan regions.… In the past people had moved to the city to escape the woods; today a lot of people are moving to live closer to nature,” Mantovani said.Deforestation in the Mata Atlântica. Image by Themium CC BY 1.0In rural areas, charcoal production has also become a key deforestation driver, especially in the northern areas of Minas Gerais and Bahia, he noted.For André de Almeida Cunha, a professor at the Department of Ecology at the University of Brasília (UnB), one of the major environmental challenges is to balance Mata Atlântica preservation against agribusiness expansion, particularly in the states of Bahia and Piauí, where the accelerated advance of grain production is fast consuming habitat.“Minas Gerais, Bahia and Piauí are strategic states for the conservation of what remains of Mata Atlântica, along with Paraná and Santa Catarina [states]. On one hand they still hold a considerable part of the Mata Atlântica forest, but on the other they face the highest cover losses,” Cunha said.“Just as important as analyzing the loss of Mata Atlântica in the last [most recent] period is to look at the historical series, and think about prospects going forward,” he added.Fog settles over a portion of the Mata Atlântica in Paraná state. Image by Angeloleithold CC BY-SA 3.0.“More worrying” than the AmazonAlthough most national and international environmental outcry has focused on Amazon deforestation, it’s also important to shed light on, and show concern for, other biomes where forest loss is “even more worrying,” said Pedro Brancalion, a researcher at the Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (Esalq) at the University of São Paulo (USP).“Mata Atlântica is still the most threatened biome. The [deforestation] process we see in the Amazon began 500 years ago in Mata Atlântica… There is still deforestation [underway] in Mata Atlântica [today] where biodiversity losses have not been offset by reforestation initiatives,” Brancalion explained.“If we lose 100 hectares of mature forest and gain 500 hectares of new forest, we cannot say that everything you lose in mature forests will regenerate in new forests… Sometimes biodiversity losses in this process are even unknown,” he noted, calling for more Atlantic Forest conservation programs instead of just relying on reforestation projects.Close up view of the Atlantic Forest, state of Paraná, Brazil. Image by Angeloleithold CC BY-SA 3.0.jpgIt’s important to note that the term “reforestation” has many definitions depending on who is using the word, and can include plantation forests, such as large-scale plantings in Brazil of Eucalyptus trees, utilized by the international paper industry. Eucalyptus monocultures have been characterized by environmental activists as “biodiversity deserts.” Such industrial plantations, which are common within the Atlantic Forest biome, are not counted in the annual deforestation/reforestation analyses done by INPE and Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica.Unlike the Brazilian Amazon, the Atlantic Forest biome until recently lacked a real time system of deforestation alerts. Then in June of this year the region was included in MapBiomas Alerta, a system that validates and refines native vegetation loss alerts in all Brazilian biomes with high-resolution images, and which is considered by experts to be a cutting-edge system for tracking spatial deforestation and for providing timely alerts. The initiative was launched by open-access platform MapBiomas — a network of NGOs, universities and technology companies in collaboration with Google.“[Before Mapbiomas alerta]… there were monitoring systems just to provide information after the problem happened in Mata Atlântica… Today the alerts system is a great tool that helps monitor deforestation when it happens,” Brancalion said. He added, however, that political will is needed to transform that data into action to curb ongoing deforestation.“Today’s Mata Atlantica could be tomorrow’s Amazon, depending on adopted public policies,” Brancalion said. But strong forest protection measures seem unlikely to be forthcoming from the agribusiness-friendly Bolsonaro administration.INPE and Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica have monitored Mata Atlântica deforestation since 1986. The biome is protected under federal law through a measure which has been endorsed by all 17 states in the region, Mantovani said.“Even though the government hasn’t invested much in science, INPE has become an island of excellence,” he said of the agency’s monitoring operation, considered by many experts to be the finest deforestation measuring and warning system in the tropics.INPE’s cutting-edge satellite-imaging technology used to track deforestation has recently been endorsed and defended by experts contacted by Mongabay. Those analysts dismissed Bolsonaro administration accusations of data manipulation. The government has offered no evidence to back up its recent charges of the inaccuracy of INPE data, which has shown that Amazon forest losses may be on the rise since Bolsonaro took power.Banner image caption: Golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia). Image by Mab Shoot CC BY 2.0.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

From science to reporting (Insider)

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Environmental journalist and Mongabay freelance contributor Ignacio Amigo started his career as a scientist.After realizing that he was reading science features and studies outside his area of expertise, he realized that he really wanted to be a reporter.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. When I was growing up, I always thought I would become a writer. I loved reading and writing, and excelled at both from a young age. But when I was 15, I had problems at school with a literature teacher. He was arrogant and pompous, and showed contempt for his students. I failed his class,… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists. Climate Science, Environmental Journalism, Forests, Insider, Journalism, Science, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

A Philippine island employs a rare cockatoo in its fight against mines

first_imgThe Philippine island of Homonhon in best known as the first site in Asia where Ferdinand Magellan set foot on his historic circumnavigation of the globe.Today, the island is home to open-pit mines that have been operating for decades to get valuable deposits of chromite and nickel.Locals opposed to the mines now have a new weapon in their fight: a recent assessment of the island’s flora and fauna, showing that it houses threatened and endemic species, in particular the critically endangered Philippine cockatoo.The regional environment department has recommended that in light of this finding, the entire island be declared a critical habitat, which would protect the identified species from mining and other activities. GUIUAN, Philippines — The island of Homonhon in the Philippines’ Eastern Samar province cemented its place in history when the Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan landed on its warm ochre shores in 1521 and named the island and the archipelago Las islas de San Lázaro. The site where he landed would later be named Lazaro Beach.Magellan and his fleet spent nearly two weeks there recuperating and gathering food and water after an arduous Pacific crossing that had left dozens of the crew dead. Nearly 500 years since that fateful visit, the island has become a beacon once again, this time for miners drawn by its nickel and chromite deposits. The Philippines is one of the world’s top producers of nickel, and Eastern Samar contains one of the most substantial deposits of this prized mineral.Since 1983, four mining companies have operated on the island, much to the chagrin of the locals.Now, though, residents opposed to the open-pit mines have found a new reason to keep up the fight — one that could mean an end to all mining on the island.The lowland forests still untouched by the mines are home to the Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia), an IUCN-listed critically endangered species endemic to the Philippines. The bird’s population in the wild is estimated at between 650 and 1,120, and commercial trade in wild-caught specimens is prohibited under CITES Appendix I.In 2017, researchers from the Philippine Misereor Partnership Inc. (PMPI) and Visayas State University assessed Homonhon’s flora and fauna, compiling a list of the island’s threatened species, including the Philippine cockatoo.Locals call the white birds abukay. They used to keep them as caged pets, valued for their ability to mimic human voices, but also resented the wild birds as pests, for snipping rice stalks.There’s little of that resentment left these days, as evidenced by the locals’ response to the researchers’ findings. According to the PMPI, when the residents were presented with the results of the survey, those in the three barangays, or villages, of Inapulangan, Bitaugan and Habag started a petition to protect the abukay. They gathered signatures and submitted a petition to the barangay leaders, requesting that the three barangays be declared a critical habitat.The regional environment agency took it a step further: it recommended that the whole island of Homonhon be designated a critical habitat.This was after the agency, together with the head of the local government’s environment and natural resources office, conducted their own validation process and spotted six Philippine cockatoos in the barangay of Inapulangan alone.The process also confirmed the presence of other endemic species on the island that are classified as endangered by the IUCN: the Visayan tarictic hornbill (Penelopides panini) and the giant golden-crowned flying fox (Acerodon jubatus), also known as the golden-capped fruit bat.Other birds found in the survey were the endemic guaiabero (Bolbopsittacus lunulatus), a parrot species known locally as bubutok; the hooded pitta (Pitta sordida); the bar-bellied cuckooshrike (Coracina striata); and the yellowish bulbul (Hypsipetes everetti), a songbird. There were also reported sightings by travelers of the Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta), one of the world’s smallest primates.Homonhon, a 26,000-acre island in Eastern Samar, has been a hotspot for nickel and chromite mining. Image by PMPI“We recommended to declare the island as ‘critical habitat’ as soon as possible to preserve and protect Homonhon’s critically endangered and other vulnerable species, including other fauna which were also recorded in the area,” the regional environment agency said during a dialogue with the PMPI.“It will take some time before it gets approved,” says Yoly Esguerra, PMPI national coordinator. “But the three barangays already have their respective resolutions and it is already in the municipal level.”Philippine law defines critical habitats as those areas outside of protected zones that are proven to be home to threatened species. Critical habitats are designated as such through an order issued by the environment secretary and the local government unit.Such an order would identify the species to be protected, create a management council to serve as the policymaking body, and ensure coordination between the central and local governments to protect the area from “any form of exploitation or destruction which may be detrimental to the survival of the threatened species.”These areas of protection require population estimates and rapid habitat assessment, species-specific studies and an examination of human-related threats to wildlife. While protected areas require a national law, critical habitats can be declared by the environment department and the local government unit, making it a speedy and more efficient option in protecting vulnerable areas.The most important aspect of declaring a critical habitat is the management: Protected areas are managed by the national environment department, while critical habitats are managed by local or municipal governments.In practice, the declaration of critical habitats also take years especially if the local government has yet to create a management body. In Palawan, the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) took the initiative to declare critical habitats in Palawan on 2011 but the guidelines were only approved and adopted in 2013.In 2016, the Philippines declared Cleopatra’s Needle, more than 40,500 hectares (100,000 acres), as critical habitats in a process that lasted for three years. In 2018, Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu wanted to declareareas in Boracay as critical habitats after the closure of the popular tourist island but the department has yet to pursue this option.In Homonhon, locals have celebrated the possibility of their own island being designated a critical habitat. If it happens, it could mean a complete ban on mining activities on the island.“The effort to declare should be urgent since the island is now under threat from different mining activities,” both operating and applying for permits, said Juderick Calumpiano, the PMPI co-convenor for Visayas and social action director of the Catholic diocese of Borongan.Banner image of a Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia) perched on a tree in a barangay in Homonhon Island during the DENR-Region 8’s assessment and validation trip. Image by Donato Fernandez / DENR-Region 8FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Mining, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by leilanicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Misinformation and blame spread concerning sources of Amazon fires

first_imgWith the global spotlight on Brazil’s Amazon fires, those in and out of government are playing a blame game, pointing fingers and often using unsubstantiated claims to target those they say set the blazes.Pres. Jair Bolsonaro, without evidence, has blamed NGOs disgruntled at losing international Amazon funding. He also accused state governors for not fighting the fires. One ruralist even blamed ICMBio (Brazil’s national park service) for setting the blazes, though she has since been charged with setting fires in a protected area.Conservationists put the blame squarely on Bolsonaro and his deregulation and defunding of government institutions, including IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental enforcement agency, which used to regularly fight fires and arrest perpetrators.IBAMA claims that, though warned days in advance of “A Day of Fire” in Pará state, it received no law enforcement backup from federal or state authorities. This allowed ruralists (radical agricultural advocates) in Altamira and Novo Progresso to set hundreds of fires on August 10-11, with little fear of fines or prosecution. Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles (left), with President Jair Bolsonaro (right). Image by Marcos Corrêa/PR.The extent to which President Jair Bolsonaro will change his much criticized environmental policies after this year’s Amazon fires became global news is still unknown. But his accusation, unbacked by evidence, last Wednesday accusing environmental NGOs of lighting the blazes seems to align with the unproven accusations of at least one cattle rancher Nair Brizola, from Cachoeira da Seca district, in Altamira, Pará state, published this Sunday by the magazine Globo Rural. Such wild claims are indicative of the rumors and innuendo now sweeping the country regarding the causes of the fires.The rancher claims that officials from ICMBio (Brazil’s national park service) set fire to the forest in her region. “There was a black motorbike setting everything on fire here. And they were on my property with that motorbike strapped over their truck,” the Globo Rural account said.She went on: “The trucks, they are doing all this terror with ICMbio. President Bolsonaro is right when he says that those NGOs are setting fire…. The fire set by the road is not from farmers.” Brizola claimed the trucks in question were imprinted with the ICMBio logo.Brizola is a ruralist (a radical agribusiness advocate), and a former candidate for councilor in Guarantã do Norte municipality, in Mato Grosso state. According to the news website O Eco, Brizola was fined in mid-August for “destroying 70.9 hectares [175 acres] of forest in the Amazon biome with the use of fire within the Serra do Cachimbo Biological Reserve, one of the most deforested conservation units in Pará.” She received a fine of R$ 1 million (US$ 240,000) for acts of deforestation, illegal burning and seizure of protected land.To fully understand the claims against ICMBio, one needs some back story. Last April, ICMBio president Adalberto Eberhard resigned and three directors also left their posts. A fourth director learned of his dismissal by Environment Minister Ricardo Salles through social media. Eberhard was against Bolsonaro’s planned merger of ICMBio with IBAMA, Brazil’s federal environmental agency, which has yet to take place.Salles since then has replaced all of the ICMbio directors with military police officers who worked with him during his time as São Paulo state secretary of the environment (2016-2017) and as private secretary of then São Paulo governor Geraldo Alckmin. So, one could possibly infer, if ICMbio agents were truly burning forest, they were either doing so on Bolsonaro’s new directors’ orders, or they were renegade officials setting fires.The photo used by the Folho do Progresso newspaper to report on the “Day of Fire,” an August 10 event that the ruralist supported newspaper itself promoted five days before the fires were intentionally set. Image by Folha do Progresso.It’s the fault of others!A few days earlier, Bolsonaro raised unfounded suspicions against NGOs as possible arsonists in the Amazon burning: “There may be criminal actions by those ‘ongeiros‘ in order to draw attention against me, against the government of Brazil…. In my view, there is interest from those NGOs [to promote burnings], which represent interests from outside Brazil.” Bolsonaro claims the NGOs set the blazes after being angered over the freezing of international Amazon funds due to the government’s anti-environmental policies.The President also blamed Amazon state governments: “There are governors, whom I don’t want to name, that are tolerant with what is going on and put the fault on the federal government. There are states in the northern region whose governors aren’t doing a thing to help fight the fires, and are enjoying [what is happening].”He offered no evidence for his claim.Amid Bolsonaro’s and ruralists’ innuendos, others are faulting the failure of both federal and state agencies. For example, it has been reported that the independent litigators of the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) warned IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, three days ahead of the so-called “Day of Fire” in Pará state, as a large group of farmers planned a massive series of burnings in the municipalities of Altamira and Novo Progresso.The “Day of Fire” had been no secret. Plans for the event were published in the local newspaper Folha do Progresso, controlled by ruralists, on August 5. The MPF in turn requested IBAMA prepare a contingency plan to curb the plot, and arrest and fine wrongdoers. But IBAMA didn’t act and hundreds of blazes were lit, some legal, others illegal, on the weekend of August 10.Two days after this criminal action, IBAMA reported the reason for its failure: it had requested law enforcement support from the National Public Security Force, controlled by Sergio Moro — he was appointed justice minister by Bolsonaro, possibly, say critics, as a reward for convicting and keeping former president Lula in jail and out of the 2018 election. Lula had been favored in the polls to win if freed and allowed to run. IBAMA also reports asking the Pará state military police for assistance, without success.Prosecutor Paulo de Tarso Moreira Oliveira, who is leading the investigation into the “Day of Fire,” stated that the ability to enforce environmental infractions has been weakened by a lack of support from Pará state. “IBAMA’s base in Novo Progresso has been withdrawn, [and its] operations scheduled for the second half of this year, corresponding to the dry period, were entirely canceled.” IBAMA typically sets up a base in Pará every year during the fire season, but with threats of violence high against the agency, it chose not to establish a post in 2019 without federal or state police protection.Joenia Wapichana, the first elected indigenous federal House deputy woman in the country, said that “land invasions and the increasing activity of miners and loggers [and other illegal groups] are the real cause of the Amazon fires, fueled by backwardness, omission, and the irresponsibility of the federal government’s environmental policies for the region.”The Amazon rainforest burns within the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.In related news, the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) has given ten days, starting from August 23, for both the Ministries of Environment and of Science and Technology to prove that rising 2019 deforestation data provided by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) is unreliable, as alleged by the Bolsonaro government.The MPF gave the same deadline to the Ministries of Agriculture and of Mines and Energy, ordering them to provide information on what they are doing to comply with the National Climate Change Policy Act of 2009, as well as with the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015, ratified by the federal executive branch in 2017. Bolsonaro is a climate change denier who threatened to pull out of the Paris Agreement during his election campaign, a pledge from which he later backpedaled. There are strong signs the administration is doing little to keep its Paris carbon reduction pledge.Rage over the Amazon fires, and strongly worded accusations over their source are blooming from all sides of the political spectrum in Brazil: Elio Gaspari, a columnist from Folha de S.Paulo newspaper, suggested: “Just put in prison half a dozen of the agro-troglodytes [elite agribusiness ruralists] that took advantage of the change of government to set fire to the forest. Those who know the Amazon are aware that there is no point in arresting pawns. Agro-troglodytes are in beautiful townhouses and spend big holidays in Miami.”Banner image caption: Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Climate Change, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

Disaster strikes in Bolivia as fires lay waste to unique forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story is a translated and adapted version of a story first published by Mongabay Latam on Aug. 22, 2019.Banner image: Fire rages outside the community of Taperas. Image courtesy of Germain Caballer.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Soy, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Fires are raging in Bolivia, hitting particularly hard the Chiquitano dry forests of the country’s southern Santa Cruz region.Officials say the fires are largely the result of intentional burning to convert forest to farmland. Sources say this practice has recently intensified after Bolivian president Evo Morales signed a decree in July expanding land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz.Satellite data indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, with data from NASA showing August fire activity in Santa Cruz was around three times higher than in years past.Human communities are suffering due to the fires, with reports of smoke-caused illnesses and drinking water shortages. Meanwhile, biologists are worried about the plants and animals of the Chiquitano dry forests, many of which are unique, isolated and found nowhere else in the world. This story is a journalistic collaboration between Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and the Bolivian newspaper Página Siete“Fire is a monster and is threatening us. Everything is ashes and fear,” says Iván Quezada, the mayor of Roboré, a town in eastern Bolivia. Last week, fires consumed more than 450,000 hectares (1.11 million acres) of forest; if added to the amount of forest destroyed since the fires in Bolivia began this year, that figure would border on a million hectares (2.5 million acres), according to official sources.Every year at this time, the chaqueos, burning events to prepare the land for planting crops or raising cattle, are carried out in the Chiquitania region of eastern Bolivia, often generating fires that burn out of control. However, this year is worse. Boosted by a controversial governmental decree that promotes the expansion of the agricultural frontier and allows “controlled burning” in forests, the chaqueos have triggered a crisis for the area’s unique dry forests and savannas.Firefighters combat the fire that spread due to high winds throughout the small region of Santa Cruz. Image courtesy of APG.On July 9, President Evo Morales approved the amendment of Supreme Decree 26075 to expand land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz. The decree authorizes the clearing of forest for agricultural activities in private- and community-held areas under a system of sustainable management. According to current regulations, this system allows controlled burning.“We have the duty and mission to boost Bolivia’s economic growth, not only based on non-renewable natural resources but also based on agriculture,” Morales said. He added via Twitter that the government is planning on expanding agricultural production and infrastructure to boost beef exports to China.Evo Morales, president of Bolivia. Image by Valter Campanato/Agência Brasil via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0 BR).A crisis in Santa CruzBolivia’s Santa Cruz region is rich in forest cover. But the lack of rain in the last three months has turned the dry forest into combustible fuel, with eight nearby communities directly affected by fires so far.One of these is the town of Roboré, where the air is thick with smoke. The situation is more somber in surrounding communities, however. Families depend on water transported from the mountains via hoses. But these hoses these have been burned, cutting off community access to drinking water. Moreover, residents report that any water that reaches them is full of ashes, which causes digestive and respiratory problems, infections and conjunctivitis. Community activities, including school, have been suspended. Local authorities have requested the declaration of a state of emergency, but the government says it is not necessary.A fire burns in dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo, a volunteer firefighter.Firefighters sent by the Santa Cruz police department to battle the blazes face difficulties on the ground. For one, there are no trails to access the fire areas. Also, because water delivery systems can’t cross roads in the region, firefighters are forced to carry water in backpacks. Ultimately, this means firefighting is slower than the rate at which the fires are spreading; as fires are being put out on one side of the road, more are ignited on the other.Firefighters strategize outside San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero, mayor of San José de Chiquitos.Along with the regulation changes and seasonal burning practices, windy conditions are contributing to the inferno, helping spread the fires over an ever-greater area. With strong winds forecast in the near future, many are worried things are just going to get worse.Skyrocketing deforestationBolivia is no stranger to fire and deforestation. According to numbers from the University of Maryland (UMD), which has been collating satellite data on the world’s forests since the beginning of the century, the country lost 7.5 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2018. The record-holding year during this period was 2016, when around 471,000 hectares (1.16 million acres) of tree cover were lost.But preliminary data for 2019 indicate this year could dramatically unseat 2016. According to the Forest and Land Audit and Social Control Authority (ABT), fires have consumed more than 953,000 hectares (2.35 million acres) of Bolivian forest so far. If these data hold true, this means that deforestation in 2019 will be more than double that of 2016 — and more than three times the 300,000 hectares (741,000 acres) lost in 2018.The lion’s share of Bolivia’s deforestation is happening in the Santa Cruz region, which comprises vast tracts of both the rainforest of the Amazon and the dry forests of the Gran Chaco. Satellite data show that Santa Cruz lost a full 10 percent of its tree cover in less than two decades. Here, too, preliminary numbers from UMD indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, according to data from NASA that show Santa Cruz fire activity in August was around three times higher than in years past.“If we take 2012 as the base year, when 128,043 hectares [316,401 acres] were deforested [in Santa Cruz], this year’s deforestation would be more than seven times greater; and if we take only the deforestation of Chiquitania, it would be three times greater,” said Pablo Solón, former Bolivian ambassador to the U.N.Satellite data show fire activity is still heavy around Roboré, but is intensifying in the northern and western portions of the Santa Cruz region. Source: NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Fire burns through forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Santa Cruz’s forests are being carved away to free up more land for soy plantations, cattle ranches, illicit coca-growing operations, and biofuel crops, as well as for the expansion of towns and smallholder farms. According to officials, the region most affected by the recent fires is a major soybean and livestock production area.“What is happening is not an accident. Five years ago, the vice president challenged agribusinesses to expand the agricultural frontier by one million hectares per year,” Solon said. “Now it has reached that figure, not of productive agricultural land but of land devastated by the flames.”Political motivationActivists say this year’s mass deforestation by fires is not only driven by economic motives, but also by political interests. In its early years, the Movement for Socialism–Political Instrument for the Sovereignty of the Peoples (MAS in Spanish) opposed biofuels. However, the group, led by Morales, later changed its platform in favor of ethanol and biodiesel, arguing that resources could be saved if Bolivia reduced its fossil fuel imports. In alliance with the country’s agroindustrial sectors, it promoted biofuel feedstock such as sugarcane as “green” energy sources.“There are direct culprits for this environmental disaster and the first one to blame is the government which has consistently passed in recent years laws of ‘forgiveness’ and promotion of the expansion of the agricultural frontier. They have also made an agricultural summit where the government, the agricultural sector of the east and communities allied to the MAS have joined,” said environmentalist Cecilia Requena. “In that summit they have decided to approve the harvest of genetically modified organisms, agrofuels, the expansion of the agricultural frontier, the export of beef to China and finally the approval of the July 9 decree that allows deforestation for agricultural purposes.”Alcides Vadillo is the regional director of the Tierra Foundation, an NGO dedicated to research into the access, use and governance of Bolivia’s land and natural resources. He says the government has been handing out areas previously classified as “permanent forest” to colonizers. “There is a lot of money at stake,” Vadillo told Mongabay.According to Requena, the government has pro-development goals that don’t mesh with 21st-century values.An ABT member assesses the impact of a fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.“This damage is irreversible and immeasurable,” Requena said. “We have no idea of ​​the dimension of the consequences, but we can say that we hope this will serve, like other disasters, to stop this suicidal drift. We need a development vision that values ​​ standing forests, not only for being vital for water but because it opens the window to an economy towards post-extractivism.”The aftermathThe Chiquitano dry forest is home to hundreds of animal and plant species, many found nowhere else in the world. In Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve alone, biologists have recorded 554 different animal species, of which 35 are endemic; 55 endemic plants have also been found there. Habitat loss is a big concern for many, as well as the outright deaths of animals and plants unable to escape the fires.“We don’t understand very well what we have lost, but we know it’s huge,” Requena said, lamenting the fires’ impacts on the region’s “enormous” biodiversity.Deforestation alerts cluster around areas previously ravaged by fire around Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve as more recent and ongoing fires encroach further into the reserve and the surrounding area. Sources: GLAD UMD and NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Volunteer firefighters battle a fire that expanded rapidly through the dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.One species affected by the fires is the plant Frailea chiquitana, a cactus endemic to Santa Cruz.“The environmental damage has been elevated to a maximum power,” said biologist Kathrin Barboza. “Of the species affected, some reproduce slowly and if they die in large quantities it can take many years to recover.” She said habitat loss that happens in isolated, unique habitats like the Chiquitano dry forest could drive species to extinction.The charred remains of animals have been found in areas affected by fire. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero.Barboza said an environmental damage assessment will be needed once the fires cease.“We have to see how many hectares of forest have been damaged and see if there are species that can be rescued,” she said, adding that the forest should be monitored and studied to determine how long it may take to recover.The region’s biodiversity isn’t the only thing affected by the fires.“Among the consequences to consider [are] impacts to soil, air (increase of greenhouse gases) and water (pollution), in addition to the loss of the landscape,” said Cecilia Tapia, an environmental engineer.The fires may be over in the near future, but their consequences will be felt for much longer. Ever Durán, the president of the College of Forest Engineers of Santa Cruz (CIF-SC), estimates that it will take around 200 years for the Chiquitano to recover.Durán added that it is imperative that the government activate the national disaster declaration protocol for fires and call for international aid, not only to extinguish the fires burning now but also to assist with mitigation of future fires and restoration of previously burned forests.A grassland area near Roboré consumed by fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Hugo Salmón, the president of the Regional Assembly of Santa Cruz, requested that the National Institute of Agrarian Reform (INRA) abolish the provision of land and the granting of settlement permits in protected areas and areas that are not already used for agricultural purposes.In response to the fires, representatives of several Santa Cruz professional associations recently issued a statement imploring the Bolivian government to stop the expansion of the agricultural frontier, and repeal laws legalizing burning in the Santa Cruz, Beni and Pando regions.“We demand and urge the government to consider that natural resources are not economic resources for a few, but [resources that support the] quality of life for all Bolivians and this will only be achieved if a sustainable framework of these resources [is maintained],” the statement reads.A plane normally used for crop-dusting is repurposed to aid firefighting near San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Amazon deforestation and development heighten Amazon fire risk: study

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer The current fires burning in the Brazilian Amazon are helping confirm the findings of a new study published this July which shows a major connection between land use and fire incidence — with deforestation and development contributing more to fire occurrence than climate change.New research shows that unrestrained deforestation, along with the construction of new highways, could expand wildfire risk in the Amazon by more than 70 percent by 2100, even inside protected areas and indigenous reserves that have relatively intact forests.Scientist suggest that efforts to improve sustainable land management and reduce future deforestation and development could offer the best defenses against the escalating threat wildfires pose due to the increased heat and drought brought by escalating climate change. Forest fires burn out of control in the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state, Brazil in 2019. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.As of August 24, there were 41,858 fires reported this year in the Brazilian Amazon — the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by that date. Likewise, the U.S. space agency NASA has shown this to be the most active fire year for the region since 2010.However, there is a major difference between 2010 and 2019. Brazil was gripped by one of the worst droughts it had seen in decades in 2010, whereas rainfall is only slightly lower than normal in 2019. So what caused this year’s non-drought related spike in destructive fires?Scientists think they may have the answer, and point to a massive uptick in deforestation between 2010 and today as a root cause.Over the last few months alone, deforestation has shot up alarmingly, with the rate in June 2019 running 88 percent higher than during the corresponding month in 2018, according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE). And with the rate soaring again in July 2019 to 278 percent , as compared with the same month a year ago, according to the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM), A Brazilian NGO.INPE reported an increase in burn scars in the Amazon, rising from 794 square kilometers last August to 1,259 square kilometers for the first 26 days of last month. For the year, INPE has recorded 46,825 hotspots in Amazonia, more than twice the number of a year ago.A new study published this July in the journal Global Change Biology, and conducted by INPE and Brazil’s Centre for Disaster Research and Monitoring (CEMADEN), confirms that if this rising deforestation trend continues, then land-use — and especially deforestation — more than climate change and drought will likely be the major driver of increases in Amazon wildfires through 2100.“Most of the current fires are related to the deforestation process,” Luiz Aragão, professor of geography and earth sciences at the University of Exeter and a study co-author told Mongabay. “If you look at the 10 municipalities with the highest deforestation rates, they are also the ones with the highest rate of fires,” he said, quoting a recent IPAM report showing that most of the 2019 increase in fires is concentrated in municipalities with higher deforestation rates.Short-term and long-term deforestation trends in the Brazilian Amazon. Annual data is based on INPE’s high resolution satellite analysis, while short-term data is based on INPE’s deforestation monitoring system DETER. * 2019 annual data should be released in November or December 2019.The link between deforestation and fire riskIt is well understood that warming temperatures, recurring prolonged drought, Amazon road development (which fragments and offers greater access to forests), and deforestation from land use change (especially the ongoing conversion of rainforests to cattle pasture and cropland), all contribute significantly to the increasing incidence of wildfires.But the big debate has been, precisely how much does each factor contribute to an uptick in fires?To find an answer, the research team modeled the different effects of land use and climate change on the Brazilian Amazon rainforest. They found that land use change alone could expand the areas at risk from wildfire by more than 70 per cent by the year 2100, even inside protected areas and indigenous reserves that have relatively intact forests.“Our paper shows that land use governance is decisive to mitigating the effects of climate change on fire probability,” said study lead author Marisa Gesteira Fonseca, a postdoctoral researcher at INPE, the agency currently responsible for the satellite monitoring of Brazil’s deforestation. “Even under the worst climate scenarios it is still important to avoid deforestation in the Amazon” in order to reduce fire risk.Looking at the probability of fire occurrence between 2041-2070, and 2071-2100 under varying land use scenarios, the research team was able to determine to what extent land use change versus climate change would effect what part of the Amazon, and even estimate how many wildfires might occur under various scenarios.“This is a significant improvement on previous papers estimating fire risk, which were much more simplistic in their modeling and assumptions about governance,” said Jos Barlow, a professor of conservation science at Lancaster University, who wasn’t involved in the research.Aragão said that the extreme intensity of the 2019 Amazon fires also helped validate the model used in the study. “If we look at the climate, we see that this year there is no sign of [severe] drought, even though we have this massive increase in fire,” but there is a significant rise in deforestation. “It really shows us that fires in the region are affected by human activities on the ground and for mitigating them, we really need to act on these [land use] players.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon thru August from 1999 to 2019. Image by Mongabay, data courtesy of INPE.Wildfires and climate change in the AmazonWhile deforestation is already recognized as an important driver of carbon emissions worldwide, wildfires are becoming an increasingly pernicious threat, even in places like the Amazon that were until recent years largely immune to widespread wildfires.Despite a recent significant uptick in deforestation, overall Brazil has seen a 75 percent decline in deforestation rates since 2004, however the rate of wildfires has increased.“What we are observing is that wildfires are becoming disconnected from the deforestation process,” said Aragão. “That means that the fire is not necessarily coming from areas that are being deforested.”A study published last year by Aragão and colleagues in the journal Nature Communications found that especially in years with lower-than-average rainfall, emissions from drought-induced fires unrelated to deforestation increasingly play a much larger role than those from deforestation, causing areas previously barely affected by fires to burn. The researchers concluded that, “in a hotter and drier future, large swaths of the Amazon, distant from the main deforestation epicenters, may burn.”Importantly, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) does not require that carbon emissions resulting from wildfires be included in a nation’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions — a significant omission considering that fires release massive amounts of carbon that would otherwise be sequestered in living, growing trees. This UN greenhouse gas source reporting loophole is especially worrisome considering the importance of the Amazon in calculating our global carbon budget — how much carbon we can “spend” before pushing past the 2 degree Celsius upper limit set by the IPCC, above which catastrophic climate change could occur.Counting forest emissions accurately is also critical to Brazil keeping its Paris Climate Agreement commitment of reducing its emissions to 37 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.In an article last year on the Conversation website, a website for academics to share research and news analysis, Barlow argued that as wildfires in once largely fire-proof rainforests like the Amazon increase, nations should prepare urgent actions aimed at mitigating the potential increase of fire emissions, in response to the intensification of droughts in tropical ecosystems.Aerial view of a large wildfire in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.Linking climate change and land-useThe recent study contributes to a growing field of research looking at the direct and indirect connection between climate change and land use policies. Globally, agriculture, deforestation, and other land use practices are responsible for roughly a quarter of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. Conversely, various reports show the tremendous potential that intact tropical forests have for combatting global warming.All of this recent research combines to make the finding of the new study, which show increased incidences of wildfire even in protected areas and indigenous reserves, more alarming.“We expected that in the worst case scenario we would find an increase [in wildfire incidence]. But the coincidence of areas of high change with indigenous lands and protected area was much larger than we thought it would be,” said Gesteira Fonseca.If deforestation and development isn’t controlled, then more than 1 million square kilometers (386,102 square miles) of indigenous lands and protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon could be subject to an increased likelihood of occurrence of wildfires by 2100, threatening both ecosystems and human populations in these areas.For Barlow, the results highlight a key issue that is now being recognized across biomes: that maintaining intact, and better yet, near-pristine ecosystems, is essential to help avoid the worst outcomes threatened by climate change. “This in itself is not new,” said Barlow, “but this paper provides a powerful and convincing set of evidence that supports it in the Amazonian context.”Even under more optimistic climate change scenarios, the socioeconomic, institutional, and environmental dynamics related to increased development and deforestation of the Amazon would dramatically increase fire probability, said the researchers.For Gesteira Fonseca and Aragão, even though the results show a higher fire incidence, the fact that land use change plays such an outsized role is in some ways a silver bullet: if we can change and improve land use practices in the Amazon, reducing deforestation and controlling development, we can also reduce the incidence of fires. “If the main variable were climate change,” said Aragão, “the scale of making a difference would be much more long term.”Citation:Fonseca, Marisa Gesteira, et al. “Effects of climate and land‐use change scenarios on fire probability during the 21st century in the Brazilian Amazon.” Global change biology 25.9 (2019): 2931-2946.Banner image caption: Forest fires burn out of control in the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more