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上海龙凤419

Regulating the regulators: It’s your turn, CFPB

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr On May 24, 2016, the House Appropriations Committee released its Fiscal Year 2017 Financial Services Bill (FY17). Aside from its usual job, to appropriate money from the yearly budget, the bill seeks to increase oversight over the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).“Increased Oversight”So what will this increased oversight look like? The relevant provision in FY17 details a three-part strategy for regulating the CFPB:According to the bill, the CFPB’s funding will be subject to the annual congressional appropriations process. Due to Dodd-Frank, funding is currently given to the CFPB directly from the Federal Reserve. Channeling the money through the appropriations process instead will require the CFPB to be accountable for, and transparent with, their use of tax dollars. The CFPB will have to explain what funds are needed, why they are needed, and how they were used.The CFPB will be required to explore pre-dispute arbitration options before issuing and enforcing a regulation. A provision of the bill states that no funds given to the CFPB “may be used to regulate pre-dispute arbitration agreements…and any regulation finalized by the Bureau to regulate pre-dispute arbitration agreements shall have no legal force or effect until the requirements regarding pre-dispute arbitration specified in the report accompanying [the bill] under the heading “Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection” are fulfilled.”The legislation also seeks to change the way leadership is structured within the CFPB. Instead of having a single Director, it would be run by a five-member Commission. The member of the Commission would be appointed by the President. continue reading »last_img read more

UK Industry Bodies Give UK Floating Offshore Wind a Push

first_imgRenewableUK and Scottish Renewables met in Glasgow, Scotland, on Tuesday, 14 November, to debate future opportunities for UK’s floating offshore wind.The two industry bodies held UK’s first floating offshore wind conference in order to urge the sector to work together in building the next generation of floating offshore wind farms in UK waters and to secure the lead in future export markets for the technology, RenewableUK said.Bader Al Lamki, Executive Director for Clean Energy at Masdar, which is co-sponsoring the conference, said: “Deep-water locations often have the best wind profiles, which illustrates the long-term commercial potential of floating wind technology. The Floating Offshore Wind 2017 Conference brings this promising sector into focus, building on the positive momentum achieved with the launch of Hywind Scotland last month.”Besides Statoil and Masdar’s 30MW Hywind Scotland, the world’s only operational floating offshore wind farm, two further projects, Kincardine and Dounreay Tri, are being developed, adding 60MW to the country’s floating offshore wind capacity by the end of the decade.If these projects are delivered successfully, RenewableUK believes that the UK will have one-third of the world’s entire floating wind capacity, providing the country an opportunity to be the floating wind leader across the globe.According to RenewableUK, industry experts emphasise the potential for floating wind to follow the same cost reduction trajectory as fixed offshore wind, pointing out that cost savings from assembling turbines onshore before towing out to sea and the use of lower cost vessels also offer cost reduction opportunities. In addition, according to the association, using floating platforms means being able to position turbines further from shore in areas of greater wind resource.“Statoil has an ambition to reduce the costs of energy from the Hywind floating wind farm to €40-60 per megawatt hour by 2030. Knowing that up to 80% of the offshore wind resources are in deep waters (more than 60 meters) where traditional bottom-fixed installations are not suitable, floating offshore wind is expected to play a significant role in the growth of offshore wind going forward,” said Stephen Bull, the Senior Vice President for Wind & Carbon Capture at Statoil, which is also co-sponsoring the event.Outside of the UK, France, Japan and the USA are also looking at opportunities to develop floating wind, RenewableUK said, adding that 80 percent of Europe and Japan’s offshore wind resources are in seas over 60 metres deep, thus can only be harnessed using floating offshore wind technology.last_img read more

GSA Eagles advance to state golf tourney

first_img Fenceviewer Staff Latest posts by Fenceviewer Staff (see all) Bio LINCOLN — The George Stevens Academy Eagles will be the lone Hancock County golf team playing in Saturday’s upcoming state team championships at the Natanis Golf Course in Vassalboro.The Eagles finished second among Class C teams with a socre of 372 in the Penobscot Valley Conference Championships on Sept. 26 at the Jato Highlands Golf Course.Six county golfers qualified for the state individual championships, which will be played on Friday, Oct. 18, at the Natanis course.Ethan Shepard of the Deer Isle-Stonington Mariners finished with a Class C medalist score of 77 at the PVC championships.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textAlso qualifying for the boys’ individual competition were Alex Heilner of GSA with an 82 and C.J. Chen of GSA with an 84, Jordan Hodgdon of the Mount Desert Island Trojans with an 85 and Kyle Lamson of MDI with an 87.Sydney Howard of the Bucksport Golden Bucks qualified for the girls’ individual competition with a score of 107.Find in-depth coverage of local news in The Ellsworth American. Subscribe digitally or in print. Schoodic Grange hosting sale – October 30, 2014center_img Latest Posts Fitness trainer is now cancer-exercise expert – October 12, 2014 Town report wins award – October 11, 2014last_img read more

Windies coach banned from first 2 ODIs for ICC code breach

first_imgDubai: West Indies coach Stuart Law has been suspended for his team’s first two One-day Internationals (ODI) against India – on October 21 and 24 – following a breach of the ICC Code of Conduct during the second Test in Hyderabad.Besides the ban, Law was penalised 100 percent of his match fee and slapped three demerit points. This means his accumulated demerit points reached four within a 24-month period leading to the two-match ban.Law had previously received a 25 percent match fee fine and one demerit point in May 2017 for a similar transgression during the Dominica Test against Pakistan.“Law was found guilty of breaching Level 2 Article 2.7 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel, which relates to ‘Public criticism of, or inappropriate comment in relation to an incident occurring in an international match or any Player, Player Support Personnel, Match Official or team participating in any international match, irrespective of when such criticism or inappropriate comment is made,” an ICC statement read.The incident took place on Sunday afternoon when Law, following the dismissal of Kieran Powell, went to the TV umpire’s room and made inappropriate comments.He then walked to the fourth umpire’s area and in the presence of the players, again directed inappropriate comments at the fourth official.“On Monday, Law admitted the offence and accepted the sanction proposed by ICC match referee Chris Broad and, as such, there was no need for a formal hearing,” the statement further read.The charges were levelled by on-field umpires Bruce Oxenford and Ian Gould, third umpire Nigel Llong and fourth official Nitin Menon. (IANS)last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week

first_imgFacebook45Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-Pet of SheltonLuna Bosco is a beautiful 2-year-old female Pitbull Terrier that weighs approximately 50 pounds, is spayed, and up to date with her vaccinations. Luna loves sitting for treats, fetch, walks, laying in the sun, chewing bones, car rides (she just falls asleep), and belly rubs.  This smart girl knows obedience commands, has good recall, and recently returned from 30 days training at Muck Creek Kennels in Roy, WA. She is doing very well with meeting other dogs, following commands and learning all kinds of fun things. Luna prefers a stable/calm home, daily exercise, and someone who will continue to challenge her mind! If you are interested in this beautiful girl, and would like to take advantage of a day of personal instruction at Muck Creek Kennels, contact an Adoption Coordinator at Adopt-A-Pet in Shelton.  Emails are preferred.Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always needs volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit www.adoptapet-wa.org, Facebook at “Adopt-A-Pet of Shelton Washington” or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email us at [email protected] or call 360-432-3091.last_img read more

Logging road construction has surged in the Congo Basin since 2003

first_imgLogging road networks have expanded widely in the Congo Basin since 2003, according to a new study.The authors calculated that the length of logging roads doubled within concessions and rose by 40 percent outside of concessions in that time period, growing by 87,000 kilometers (54,000 miles).Combined with rising deforestation in the region since 2000, the increase in roads is concerning because road building is often followed by a pulse of settlement leading to deforestation, hunting and mining in forest ecosystems. The length of roads in Congo Basin logging concessions has doubled since 2003, according to new research, raising concerns about the impacts of these incursions into the world’s second-largest bank of tropical forest.The authors of the study, published June 24 in the journal Nature Sustainability, note that roads allow people to enter new frontiers, often leading to a contagion of deforestation for agriculture and increased hunting of the animals found there.“That obviously bodes alarmingly for everything from forest elephants to gorillas and chimpanzees and lots of other wildlife that are subject to hunting,” William Laurance, a tropical ecologist and professor at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, said in an interview.William Laurance, one of the study’s authors, examines the skull of a forest elephant illegally killed for its tusks inside a national park in the Republic of Congo. Image by Mahmoud Mahmoud.Deforestation rates around the oldest roads in the Congo Basin are about four times what they were at the beginning of the 21st century, and numbers of key species have dropped off considerably. There are only about a third as many forest elephants alive today compared to 10 years ago, for example.Following a journey across several Congo Basin countries several years ago, Laurance and Fritz Kleinschroth, the paper’s lead author, decided to use existing satellite data to understand how the region’s road network has evolved since 2003. The team also calculated the deforestation in the immediate area around logging roads, and they compared the persistence of roads inside and outside designated logging concessions.They found that the length of roads increased by 87,000 kilometers (54,000 miles) to 231,000 kilometers (143,500 miles) in the Congo Basin between 2003 and 2018. The rate of expansion outside concessions was somewhat less than inside, at around 40 percent. But the rate of forest loss was higher along roads beyond concession boundaries.The construction of a logging road in Cameroon. Image by Fritz Kleinschroth.The analysis also showed that roads inside these logging areas are about four times as likely to be abandoned. Shuttering access to roads not only allows forest to regenerate along the road’s path, but it also potentially reduces the deforestation that often follows the human settlement of an area.The logging companies with licenses to harvest trees abandoned 44 percent of logging roads over the period examined in the study. In contrast, only 12 percent of roads were abandoned beyond the borders of these concessions.“It can make a big difference,” Laurance said. “That’s where [selectively logged] timber concessions start to look like a more sustainable alternative rather than facilitating deforestation, which clearly they do in some cases.”A bushmeat hunter with monkeys killed in the forest. Image by William Laurance.In the Democratic Republic of Congo, where fewer logging concessions exist due to a sporadically enforced moratorium on new licenses in place since 2002, deforestation typically occurs at higher rates around roads than in neighboring countries. Previous research shows that up to about 90 percent of logging takes place informally, and often illegally, in DRC.Roads also facilitate the establishment of small-scale agriculture, which studies in recent years have shown is the most significant driver of deforestation in the country. The authors also note that even more deforestation could occur at the hands of loggers as DRC’s leaders issued concession permits covering 6,500 square kilometers (2,500 square miles) to Chinese companies in 2018.Shutting roads off to further use once companies have cut the allowed amount of timber in a given area could minimize the hunting, mining and deforestation that occurs in the wake of road construction, Laurance said, particularly with measures that have proved effective, such as the destruction of bridges. But, he added, it should happen more often.A logging truck plies a road in the Republic of Congo. Image by William Laurance.“It’s not like 80 percent of the roads are being closed,” Laurance said.Kleinschroth, a tropical ecologist at ETH Zurich, agreed.“Companies could do more in actively closing and actively making sure who is using which roads,” he said.Still, Kleinschroth said he understands the desire to build out road networks in these countries, which are among the poorest in the world. Roads are often seen as a first step toward economic development. Though future road maintenance costs, particularly in the rain-soaked tropics, are often woefully underestimated, officials sometimes strike deals with logging companies to keep roads open or even pave them as a way of encouraging commerce within the country and throughout the Congo Basin.A gold mine in the middle of a forest in the Republic of Congo. Image by Fritz Kleinschroth.“In this region, there are some countries that do not have permanent road connections with neighboring countries,” Kleinschroth said. “That’s extremely rare that two neighboring countries are not even reachable by road, so I understand their reasoning from a perspective of economic development.“We shouldn’t be too quick to criticize building a road,” he added.Banner image of road paving in the Republic of Congo by Fritz Kleinschroth.John Cannon is a Mongabay staff writer based in the Middle East. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.CitationKleinschroth, F., Laporte, N., Laurance, W. F., Goetz, S. J., & Ghazoul, J. (2019). Road expansion and persistence in forests of the Congo Basin. Nature Sustainability. doi:10.1038/s41893-019-0310-6FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Avoided Deforestation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Bushmeat, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forestry, Forests, Fragmentation, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Iucn, Logging, logging roads, Mammals, Mining, Natural Capital, Parks, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Ecological Services, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Research, Roads, Satellite Imagery, Saving Rainforests, Saving Species From Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

From science to reporting (Insider)

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Environmental journalist and Mongabay freelance contributor Ignacio Amigo started his career as a scientist.After realizing that he was reading science features and studies outside his area of expertise, he realized that he really wanted to be a reporter.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. When I was growing up, I always thought I would become a writer. I loved reading and writing, and excelled at both from a young age. But when I was 15, I had problems at school with a literature teacher. He was arrogant and pompous, and showed contempt for his students. I failed his class,… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists. Climate Science, Environmental Journalism, Forests, Insider, Journalism, Science, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Philippine bill seeks to grant nature the same legal rights as humans

first_imgArticle published by leilani Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Law A coalition in the Philippines is pushing for legislation of a “right of nature” bill, which would confer legal personhood on nature.The bill, should it pass into law, will create a paradigm shift in existing human-centered environmental laws and make individuals, governments and corporations more responsible and accountable when dealing with nature.The bill, currently in the drafting, adequately represents the connectedness between indigenous peoples and their ancestral domains, an indigenous women’s rights activist says.The bill is part of a growing movement around the world to recognize ecosystems and species as legal entities, as a way of boosting their protection amid intensifying threats. MANILA — Who speaks up in court for a dolphin or a turtle when its habitat gets polluted? Does an animal even have the right to legal redress in such a case?Those are the questions underlying a push by environmental activists and lawyers in the Philippines to expand legal protection for the environment, strengthen indigenous people’s rights over ancestral domain lands, and hold individuals, government and corporations accountable for environmental abuses and lapses.Initiated by the Philippine-Misereor Partnership Inc. (PMPI), the “right of nature” bill is currently in the draft stage. Though it has yet to be filed with either house of Congress, when it does it will be the first bill of its kind to be considered for legislation in the Philippines.Inspired by similar initiatives in Latin American countries such as Ecuador and Bolivia, the RON bill’s main purpose is to grant nature legal personhood. This would endow it with rights currently associated with humans, including the right to exist and thrive; to habitat and diversity of life; to water and clean air; to equilibrium; to restoration; to be free from chemical trespass; to natural evolution; and to develop sustainably.“We want to recognize nature as a distinct entity with legal personality,” says Macki Maderazo, the PMPI’s legal counsel. “When you say it has a legal personality then a person can represent nature before a court of law and can seek damages or prosecute persons who committed violations under the bill,” he adds.The bill, touted as “revolutionary” among lawmakers, is expected to create a paradigm shift in existing environmental protection perspectives. Current Philippine laws on the environment are human-centered, Maderazo says, focusing on protecting the environmental rights of individuals but not of the environment itself. The RON bill presents a different perspective: nature gets legal protection because it’s recognized as a distinct legal entity that deserves legal representation.Activists have previously tried to pursue the case for legal personhood for the environment in court. In 2007, a group of environment lawyers led by Benjamin Cabrido Jr. filed a case against the Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd. (JAPEX) over its oil exploration, development and exploitation activities in the Tañon Strait, the country’s largest marine protected area, between the islands of Cebu and Negros.Among the petitioners named in the case were “Resident Marine Mammals,” including “toothed whales, dolphins, porpoises, and other [cetacean] species inhabiting Tañon Strait represented by human beings in their capacity as legal guardians of the lesser life-forms and as responsible stewards of God’s creations.”After an eight-year legal battle, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the petitioners and declared null and void the service contract between JAPEX and the energy department. The court justified its ruling on apparent violations of the 1987 Constitution, the National Integrated Protected Systems Act (NIPAS) and the Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) decree.PMPI clamoured for a right of nature bill during President Rodrigo Duterte’s 2019 State of the Nation Address (SONA) last July 22. Image by PMPIBut the ruling held that animals have no “legal personality” and thus could not be represented by lawyers.“In our jurisdiction, persons and entities are recognized both in law and the Rules of Court as having standing to sue and, therefore, may be properly represented as real parties in interest. The same cannot be said about animals,” the ruling stated. “There is no way that we, humans, can claim to speak for animals let alone present that they would wish to use our court system, which is designed to ensure that humans seriously carry their responsibility including ensuring a viable ecology for themselves, which of course includes compassion for all living things.”According to Maderazo, the position of the Supreme Court essentially means that nature, its ecosystems and animals are “not a subject of the law and therefore not a subject of its protection.”“What we protect are the people who will protect the dolphins, not the dolphin itself,” he says. “But if you killed the dolphins, it will have impacts on the ecosystem and eventually affect the people. We want to expand the discussion with this bill.”The framework also syncs with indigenous people’s perspective of interconnectedness with nature, affirming that indigenous peoples are one with and cannot exist without nature, says Arline Santiago of the Igorota Foundation, a women’s community organization in the Cordilleras region.She says the bill and its implementing rules and regulations will also support the Indigenous People’s Rights Act (IPRA), particularly by clarifying the process to acquire free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) — a requirement for corporations when initiating projects within ancestral domain territories.“As of now … what’s lacking in the IPRA is the details of the process of acquiring the FPIC,” Santiago says, adding that the law doesn’t properly state the materials that corporations should prepare in obtaining the consent. “In our experience, corporations fulfill the technical requirements only while doing the FPIC. Some don’t even have any feasibility studies yet they want an FPIC.”Maderazo says he also believes the bill will complement and strengthen environmental and indigenous people’s laws in the country, though should it be enacted, the bill will require a thorough reassessment of existing laws.The bill also details a mechanism for just compensation for environmental damages, which would be allocated for the restoration of damaged areas, Maderazo says. “If there are monetary award for the damages on a coral reef or mangrove area, then this money will go to the trust fund and this money will ensure the restoration and protection of the area,” he says.The Philippine right of nature bill is part of a growing movement worldwide to recognize ecosystems and species as legal entities, as a way of boosting their protection amid intensifying threats. In 2017, a Māori tribe in New Zealand won unprecedented legal recognition of its river, the Whanganui, as a living entity by the state. In Argentina in 2014, a captive orangutan was granted “non-human person rights,” and in 2016 a captive chimpanzee in Peru was similarly granted legal personhood.In 2014, the Indian Supreme Court ruled that all non-human animals have both statutory and constitutional rights in India. That was followed by a 2015 decision from the Delhi High Court that birds have the fundamental legal right to fly, and a 2018 decision from the Uttarakhand High Court that identified members of the entire animal kingdom as persons.Banner image of a turtle in the Tubbataha Reefs National Park in the Philippines. Image by Gregory Piper/Coral Reef Image BankFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

A Philippine island employs a rare cockatoo in its fight against mines

first_imgThe Philippine island of Homonhon in best known as the first site in Asia where Ferdinand Magellan set foot on his historic circumnavigation of the globe.Today, the island is home to open-pit mines that have been operating for decades to get valuable deposits of chromite and nickel.Locals opposed to the mines now have a new weapon in their fight: a recent assessment of the island’s flora and fauna, showing that it houses threatened and endemic species, in particular the critically endangered Philippine cockatoo.The regional environment department has recommended that in light of this finding, the entire island be declared a critical habitat, which would protect the identified species from mining and other activities. GUIUAN, Philippines — The island of Homonhon in the Philippines’ Eastern Samar province cemented its place in history when the Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan landed on its warm ochre shores in 1521 and named the island and the archipelago Las islas de San Lázaro. The site where he landed would later be named Lazaro Beach.Magellan and his fleet spent nearly two weeks there recuperating and gathering food and water after an arduous Pacific crossing that had left dozens of the crew dead. Nearly 500 years since that fateful visit, the island has become a beacon once again, this time for miners drawn by its nickel and chromite deposits. The Philippines is one of the world’s top producers of nickel, and Eastern Samar contains one of the most substantial deposits of this prized mineral.Since 1983, four mining companies have operated on the island, much to the chagrin of the locals.Now, though, residents opposed to the open-pit mines have found a new reason to keep up the fight — one that could mean an end to all mining on the island.The lowland forests still untouched by the mines are home to the Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia), an IUCN-listed critically endangered species endemic to the Philippines. The bird’s population in the wild is estimated at between 650 and 1,120, and commercial trade in wild-caught specimens is prohibited under CITES Appendix I.In 2017, researchers from the Philippine Misereor Partnership Inc. (PMPI) and Visayas State University assessed Homonhon’s flora and fauna, compiling a list of the island’s threatened species, including the Philippine cockatoo.Locals call the white birds abukay. They used to keep them as caged pets, valued for their ability to mimic human voices, but also resented the wild birds as pests, for snipping rice stalks.There’s little of that resentment left these days, as evidenced by the locals’ response to the researchers’ findings. According to the PMPI, when the residents were presented with the results of the survey, those in the three barangays, or villages, of Inapulangan, Bitaugan and Habag started a petition to protect the abukay. They gathered signatures and submitted a petition to the barangay leaders, requesting that the three barangays be declared a critical habitat.The regional environment agency took it a step further: it recommended that the whole island of Homonhon be designated a critical habitat.This was after the agency, together with the head of the local government’s environment and natural resources office, conducted their own validation process and spotted six Philippine cockatoos in the barangay of Inapulangan alone.The process also confirmed the presence of other endemic species on the island that are classified as endangered by the IUCN: the Visayan tarictic hornbill (Penelopides panini) and the giant golden-crowned flying fox (Acerodon jubatus), also known as the golden-capped fruit bat.Other birds found in the survey were the endemic guaiabero (Bolbopsittacus lunulatus), a parrot species known locally as bubutok; the hooded pitta (Pitta sordida); the bar-bellied cuckooshrike (Coracina striata); and the yellowish bulbul (Hypsipetes everetti), a songbird. There were also reported sightings by travelers of the Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta), one of the world’s smallest primates.Homonhon, a 26,000-acre island in Eastern Samar, has been a hotspot for nickel and chromite mining. Image by PMPI“We recommended to declare the island as ‘critical habitat’ as soon as possible to preserve and protect Homonhon’s critically endangered and other vulnerable species, including other fauna which were also recorded in the area,” the regional environment agency said during a dialogue with the PMPI.“It will take some time before it gets approved,” says Yoly Esguerra, PMPI national coordinator. “But the three barangays already have their respective resolutions and it is already in the municipal level.”Philippine law defines critical habitats as those areas outside of protected zones that are proven to be home to threatened species. Critical habitats are designated as such through an order issued by the environment secretary and the local government unit.Such an order would identify the species to be protected, create a management council to serve as the policymaking body, and ensure coordination between the central and local governments to protect the area from “any form of exploitation or destruction which may be detrimental to the survival of the threatened species.”These areas of protection require population estimates and rapid habitat assessment, species-specific studies and an examination of human-related threats to wildlife. While protected areas require a national law, critical habitats can be declared by the environment department and the local government unit, making it a speedy and more efficient option in protecting vulnerable areas.The most important aspect of declaring a critical habitat is the management: Protected areas are managed by the national environment department, while critical habitats are managed by local or municipal governments.In practice, the declaration of critical habitats also take years especially if the local government has yet to create a management body. In Palawan, the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) took the initiative to declare critical habitats in Palawan on 2011 but the guidelines were only approved and adopted in 2013.In 2016, the Philippines declared Cleopatra’s Needle, more than 40,500 hectares (100,000 acres), as critical habitats in a process that lasted for three years. In 2018, Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu wanted to declareareas in Boracay as critical habitats after the closure of the popular tourist island but the department has yet to pursue this option.In Homonhon, locals have celebrated the possibility of their own island being designated a critical habitat. If it happens, it could mean a complete ban on mining activities on the island.“The effort to declare should be urgent since the island is now under threat from different mining activities,” both operating and applying for permits, said Juderick Calumpiano, the PMPI co-convenor for Visayas and social action director of the Catholic diocese of Borongan.Banner image of a Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia) perched on a tree in a barangay in Homonhon Island during the DENR-Region 8’s assessment and validation trip. Image by Donato Fernandez / DENR-Region 8FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Mining, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by leilanicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Wilderness cuts the risk of extinction for species in half

first_imgWilderness areas buffer species against the risk of extinction, reducing it by more than half, a new study shows.Places with lots of unique species and wilderness with the last remaining sections of good habitat for certain species had a more pronounced impact on extinction risk.The authors contend that safeguarding the last wild places should be a conservation priority alongside the protection and restoration of heavily impacted “hotspots.” Plant and animal species living in wilderness areas are less likely to go extinct, a recent study has found.Defined as intact habitats that haven’t been affected by human use on industrial scales, wilderness “buffers” the life it supports against the threat of extinction. In fact, it slashes the risk on average by more than half compared to that faced by species living outside these areas, Moreno Di Marco, James Watson, and colleagues reported Sept. 18 in the journal Nature.“This research provides the evidence for how essential it is for the global conservation community specifically target protecting Earth’s remaining wilderness,” Watson, an ecologist with the University of Queensland, in Australia, and the Wildlife Conservation Society, said in a statement.The rainforest in Borneo. Image by Liana Joseph/WCS.In an earlier study, Watson and a team of researchers reported that 3.3 million square kilometers (1.27 million square miles) of wilderness — an area the size of India — has been lost since the 1990s. At the same time, a recent report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services found that 1 million species are staring at the prospect of extinction.Currently, however, the focus of a lot of conservation is to protect heavily impacted “hotspots” that are disappearing as a result of human use and where many of the species are sliding toward extinction, Di Marco, the study’s lead author, said in an interview.“That’s OK if your objective is to prevent the extinction of species that are highly threatened,” said Di Marco, an ecologist at CSIRO Land and Water (Australia’s national science research agency) and Italy’s Sapienza University of Rome. But that approach doesn’t account for the benefits that intact wilderness areas provide for biodiversity, he added. Until now, no one had tabulated the role that wilderness plays in the survival of species.Uninhabited Campbell Island, New Zealand. Image by Liana Joseph/WCS.Watson and several colleagues published a map of what’s left of Earth’s wilderness in 2017, and a 2016 map plots out the locations and severity of human pressure around the globe. The team drew from that data and used a new biodiversity modeling tool developed at CSIRO Australia, which combines the differences in the makeup of species at different sites with the habitat quality at those sites. They were then able to calculate the relative importance of wilderness compared to other habitats in preventing species extinction. They found that species living outside wilderness areas were more than twice as likely on average to be threatened with extinction.Wilderness landscapes span the globe, from the high Arctic to equatorial rainforests. It turns out that the “buffering effect” of wilderness on extinction risk holds across a wide range of these habitats.“There wasn’t just one ecological or biogeographic region where wilderness areas were important,” Di Marco said.Global probabilities of species extinction in different biogeographical regions. Image courtesy of Di Marco et al., 2019.The authors note that all wilderness areas have “intrinsic conservation value,” and they store carbon, provide clean water and support the livelihoods of indigenous communities around the globe.“Wilderness areas are known to play fundamental roles for humanity,” Di Marco said.In some places, though, the effect was more substantial, especially where large tracts of wilderness still persist. Spots with lots of unique species also had a more pronounced impact on extinction risk, as did places that hold some of the last, best slices of good habitat for certain species.The research showed some wilderness areas, such as areas surrounding Madidi National Park in the Bolivian Amazon, play an extraordinary role in their respective regional contexts, where their loss would drastically reduce the probability of persistence of biodiversity. Image by Rob Wallace/WCS.But when the scientists incorporated a map of global protected areas, they found that these high-priority wilderness areas, which they identified on every continent, were only about as likely to be designated as parks and reserves as wilderness areas that weren’t as vital in warding off the risk of extinction.The central concern for the global conservation agenda right now is the protection and restoration of the most threatened habitats and species. While that’s critical to stemming the unsettling rate of biodiversity loss, it’s only part of the solution, Di Marco said. He and his colleagues contend that it’s equally important to safeguard the last wild spaces.“If we do lose those areas, what’s going to happen is a very high increase potentially in extinction rates,” Di Marco said. “We cannot disregard them.”Banner image of an elephant in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitations:Allan, J. R., Venter, O., & Watson, J. E. M. (2017). Temporally inter-comparable maps of terrestrial wilderness and the Last of the Wild. Scientific Data, 4, 170187. doi:10.1038/sdata.2017.187Di Marco, M., Ferrier, S., Harwood, T. D., Hoskins, A. J., & Watson, J. E. M. (2019). Wilderness areas halve the extinction risk of terrestrial biodiversity. Nature, 573(7775), 582-585. doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1567-7Jones, K. R., Venter, O., Fuller, R. A., Allan, J. R., Maxwell, S. L., Negret, P. J., & Watson, J. E. M. (2018). One-third of global protected land is under intense human pressure. Science, 360(6390), 788 LP – 791. doi:10.1126/science.aap9565Venter, O., Sanderson, E. W., Magrach, A., Allan, J. R., Beher, J., Jones, K. R., … Watson, J. E. M. (2016). Global terrestrial Human Footprint maps for 1993 and 2009. Scientific Data, 3(1), 160067. doi:10.1038/sdata.2016.67Watson, J. E. M., Shanahan, D. F., Di Marco, M., Allan, J., Laurance, W. F., Sanderson, E. W., … Venter, O. (2016). Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets. Current Biology, 26(21), 2929-2934. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.08.049FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecological Footprint, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Invertebrates, Logging, Mass Extinction, Plants, Poaching, Rainforests, Research, Saving Rainforests, Sixth Mass Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more