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“State Inaction In Providing Healthcare To Citizens Violates Article 21”: Patna High Court Directs State Human Rights Commission To Conduct Surprise Inspections At Covid Hospitals

first_imgNews Updates”State Inaction In Providing Healthcare To Citizens Violates Article 21″: Patna High Court Directs State Human Rights Commission To Conduct Surprise Inspections At Covid Hospitals Akshita Saxena21 April 2021 12:06 AMShare This – x”If Court reaches a conclusion that COVID patients are being allowed to die because of lack of oxygen supply, the Court will surely intervene “Expressing strong displeasure over absence of any comprehensive action plan of the State Government for meeting the present surge of COVID cases in Bihar, the Patna High Court on Monday sought intervention of the Bihar Human Rights Commission. A Division Bench comprising of Justices CS Singh and Mohit Kumar Shah stated that lack of adequate healthcare, especially in the middle of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginExpressing strong displeasure over absence of any comprehensive action plan of the State Government for meeting the present surge of COVID cases in Bihar, the Patna High Court on Monday sought intervention of the Bihar Human Rights Commission. A Division Bench comprising of Justices CS Singh and Mohit Kumar Shah stated that lack of adequate healthcare, especially in the middle of a pandemic, is violative of citizens’ right to life under Article 21 of the Constitution. “Any inaction on the part of the State, within the meaning of Article 12 of the Constitution of India, in providing adequate health care to its citizen, particularly during the prevailing COVID-19 situation, would be violative of right to life under Article 21 of the Constitution of India,” the Bench said. The Bench has also taken a stern view against acute shortage of oxygen supply for medical use. “Serious issues have been raised about deaths taking place in various government and private hospitals because of lack of supply of oxygen. This Court cannot overlook such aspects if such allegations are true as it directly relates to a citizen’s fundamental right. If the Court reaches a conclusion that COVID patients have been or are being allowed to die because of lack of oxygen supply, the Court exercising its power of judicial review will surely intervene and pass appropriate orders in this regard,” the Bench cautioned. It has therefore directed the State Human Rights Commission to conduct surprise inspections of Dedicated COVID Hospitals (DCHs) and Dedicated COVID Health Centers (DCHCs) as well as COVID Care Centers (CCCs) to find out as to whether adequate facilities are available there or not with the desired standard of sanitization and cleanliness. The development comes days after the Bench noted discrepancy in the data shown by the State regarding availability of health infrastructure, and the reported ground realities. “If the said data and statistics, as presented, are taken to be correct, the number of beds available in the State of Bihar is much more than the number of patients who require admission in COVID Care Centres (CCC), Dedicated COVID Health Centres (DCHS) and Dedicated COVID Hospitals (DCH), except for Patna. Prima facie we are not satisfied with the said depiction,” the High Court had observed in an earlier order. Other developments During the hearing, the Bench addressed various issues surrounding the issues at hand: Shortage of Oxygen During the hearing, the Bench noted that an officer of the Patna High Court succumbed to COVID disease because oxygen was not available in the hospitals. Intending to take up this matter as an example to examine whether Court’s intervention’s is needed or not, the Bench has directed the Registrar General, Patna High Court to submit an exhaustive report to this Court explaining in detail the circumstances in which the said officer of the High Court died. Appointment of Controller of Drugs in the State The Bench was informed that the post of Controller of Drugs in the State has not been filled up on a regular basis and a person is holding the said post on ad hoc basis since years together. In this backdrop, the State Government has been directed to inform the Court as to whether it has a regular Controller of Drugs or not. Remdesvir has no proven effectiveness in treating Covid-19 AIIMS Patna Head has informed the Bench that a wrong perception is prevailing in the minds of general public regarding effectiveness of Remdesvir injection for treatment of COVID patients “There is no scientific proof or suggestion/indication to the effect that the said Remdesivir injection is of any help for treating COVID infected patients,” AIIMS Director Dr. PK Singh informed the Court. He stated that it was because of a misconception or wrong perception prevailing in the minds of the general public that suddenly the said Remdesivir injections have gone out of the market possibly because of creation of unnecessary artificial requirement and consequent shortage on account of hoarding and panic purchases.Also Read: RT-PCR Tests Not Being Done At Desired Rate; Illicit Trade Of Remdesivir Injection: Patna High Court Expresses Serious Concern Over Covid Management In Bihar However, the Bench has refrained from making any comments on the matter and has asked the State to take necessary action. It said, “We, at this stage restrain ourselves from making any comment in this regard. We, however do observe that State, in consultation with the experts must take all possible measures to address this aspect and do the needful.” Medical Waste Disposal Inter alia, the Bench has asked the Executive Director, State Health Society to inform the Court regarding the process of disposal of ‘COVID testing kits in private laboratories’, ‘syringes used for vaccination’, ‘PPE kits’, and masks. Case Title: Shivani Kaushik v. Union of India & Ors. Click Here To Download OrderRead OrderSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Medlock, Blurton sprint to URSS wins at Byers

first_imgBYERS, Colo. (June 25) – Justin Medlock and Zach Blurton were feature winners when the United Rebel Sprint Series rolled back through the pit gates at Colorado Motor Sports Park Satur­day night.Medlock scored the first victory of his career in the feature rained out and made up from May 28 at Byers. Blurton then paced the scheduled event.Medlock led every lap of the rescheduled contest after starting outside the front row. Austin Mclean took the runner-up position back from Bob Schaeffer on lap 15; Scott Cochran and Tod Plemons completed the top five.Blurton wired the field in the scheduled 20-lapper that followed, becoming the fourth different win­ner in as many URSS events at Byers this season.Lap 12 saw second running Coby Pearce go off track, giving the runner-up spot to Mclean.As the laps dwindled away it was Blurton holding a comfortable lead and taking his first Colorado Region win of 2016. Mclean made it two runner-up finishes in a row with Cochran, Brian Hardman and Schaeffer rounding out the top five.ResultsMake-up feature – 
1. Justin Medlock; 
2. Austin McLean; 
3. Bob Schaeffer; 
4. Scott Cochran; 
5. Todd Plemons
; 6. Zach Blurton; 
7. Clint Schubert
; 8. Coby Pearce
; 9. Howard Van Dyke; 
10. Brad Wasson; 
11. Tara Jo Christie; 
12. Luke Lucero; 
13. Brian Hardman; 14. Scott Rhoades; 15. Nick Sutton; 16. Ian Christie.Scheduled feature – 
1. Blurton; 
2 McLean; 
3. Cochran; 
4. Hardman; 
5. Schaeffer
; 6. Lucero
; 7. Plemons
; 8. Rhoades; 9. Medlock; 
10. Sutton; 
11. Shubert; 
12. Wasson
; 13. Van Dyke
; 14. Tara Jo Christie
; 15. Pearce; 16. Ian Christie.last_img read more

Semenya early Olympic 800m favourite after winning in Doha

first_imgDOHA, Qatar (AP): Caster Semenya made herself the early Olympic frontrunner by easily winning the women’s 800 metres in the Doha Diamond League meet yesterday. Semenya decimated the field in a season’s best 1:58.26 seconds, almost nine-tenths of a second better than second-place Habitam Alemu of Ethiopia, 1:59.14. It was her second standout result to start the Olympic year, after announcing her ambition last month with an unprecedented hat-trick of 400m, 800m, and 1,500m titles at the South African championships. They were all the more remarkable because she’s hardly featured since her 2012 Olympic silver medal. She still hasn’t come close to the 1:55.56 she set in winning the 2009 Worlds’, when news leaked that she would be subject to gender testing. Semenya improved on her 800m time in Stellenbosch at Doha and was delighted. “I feel very good this year. I am focused on what I am doing,” she said. “My preparation has gone really well, but I can’t say there have been many changes in my training or my attitude.” Not so happy were Dafne Schippers, the World 200 champion, who was pipped in the 100m by American Tori Bowie, and the home favourite in the men’s high jump, Mutaz Essa Barshim. Barshim, who has jumped as high as 2.43 metres in setting the Asian record, could not do any better than 2.26, and was seventh in a competition won by American Erik Kynard at 2.33. “It’s all part of the plan. This being an Olympic year, I’m taking things slow,” Barshim insisted. “Last year, I peaked early, and by July, I was practically dead. I’m not going to repeat that mistake.” Bowie, the 100 bronze-medal winner at the Worlds last year in Beijing, said: “I gave the race my everything, and the win was mine. This being an Olympic year, I’m eagerly looking ahead at the outdoor season. I feel I’m a much better runner now than I was last season.” The women’s 3,000m featured two World champions in a fascinating duel. World champion Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia prevailed against World 10,000 champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya. Ayana was pushed to clock a season’s best 8:23.11. Cheruiyot was fourth. The men’s 200m was won by American Emir Webb in a meet record of 19.85s. He was the only person to break 20 seconds. Kenyans swept the 1,500m and 3,000m steeplechase. Asbel Kiprop led Elijah Motonei Manangoi and Silas Kiplagat to the podium in the 1,500m in 3:32.15, and Conseslus Kipruto won the steeplechase. DISAPPOINTED WITH LOSSlast_img read more

Disaster strikes in Bolivia as fires lay waste to unique forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story is a translated and adapted version of a story first published by Mongabay Latam on Aug. 22, 2019.Banner image: Fire rages outside the community of Taperas. Image courtesy of Germain Caballer.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Soy, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Fires are raging in Bolivia, hitting particularly hard the Chiquitano dry forests of the country’s southern Santa Cruz region.Officials say the fires are largely the result of intentional burning to convert forest to farmland. Sources say this practice has recently intensified after Bolivian president Evo Morales signed a decree in July expanding land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz.Satellite data indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, with data from NASA showing August fire activity in Santa Cruz was around three times higher than in years past.Human communities are suffering due to the fires, with reports of smoke-caused illnesses and drinking water shortages. Meanwhile, biologists are worried about the plants and animals of the Chiquitano dry forests, many of which are unique, isolated and found nowhere else in the world. This story is a journalistic collaboration between Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and the Bolivian newspaper Página Siete“Fire is a monster and is threatening us. Everything is ashes and fear,” says Iván Quezada, the mayor of Roboré, a town in eastern Bolivia. Last week, fires consumed more than 450,000 hectares (1.11 million acres) of forest; if added to the amount of forest destroyed since the fires in Bolivia began this year, that figure would border on a million hectares (2.5 million acres), according to official sources.Every year at this time, the chaqueos, burning events to prepare the land for planting crops or raising cattle, are carried out in the Chiquitania region of eastern Bolivia, often generating fires that burn out of control. However, this year is worse. Boosted by a controversial governmental decree that promotes the expansion of the agricultural frontier and allows “controlled burning” in forests, the chaqueos have triggered a crisis for the area’s unique dry forests and savannas.Firefighters combat the fire that spread due to high winds throughout the small region of Santa Cruz. Image courtesy of APG.On July 9, President Evo Morales approved the amendment of Supreme Decree 26075 to expand land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz. The decree authorizes the clearing of forest for agricultural activities in private- and community-held areas under a system of sustainable management. According to current regulations, this system allows controlled burning.“We have the duty and mission to boost Bolivia’s economic growth, not only based on non-renewable natural resources but also based on agriculture,” Morales said. He added via Twitter that the government is planning on expanding agricultural production and infrastructure to boost beef exports to China.Evo Morales, president of Bolivia. Image by Valter Campanato/Agência Brasil via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0 BR).A crisis in Santa CruzBolivia’s Santa Cruz region is rich in forest cover. But the lack of rain in the last three months has turned the dry forest into combustible fuel, with eight nearby communities directly affected by fires so far.One of these is the town of Roboré, where the air is thick with smoke. The situation is more somber in surrounding communities, however. Families depend on water transported from the mountains via hoses. But these hoses these have been burned, cutting off community access to drinking water. Moreover, residents report that any water that reaches them is full of ashes, which causes digestive and respiratory problems, infections and conjunctivitis. Community activities, including school, have been suspended. Local authorities have requested the declaration of a state of emergency, but the government says it is not necessary.A fire burns in dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo, a volunteer firefighter.Firefighters sent by the Santa Cruz police department to battle the blazes face difficulties on the ground. For one, there are no trails to access the fire areas. Also, because water delivery systems can’t cross roads in the region, firefighters are forced to carry water in backpacks. Ultimately, this means firefighting is slower than the rate at which the fires are spreading; as fires are being put out on one side of the road, more are ignited on the other.Firefighters strategize outside San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero, mayor of San José de Chiquitos.Along with the regulation changes and seasonal burning practices, windy conditions are contributing to the inferno, helping spread the fires over an ever-greater area. With strong winds forecast in the near future, many are worried things are just going to get worse.Skyrocketing deforestationBolivia is no stranger to fire and deforestation. According to numbers from the University of Maryland (UMD), which has been collating satellite data on the world’s forests since the beginning of the century, the country lost 7.5 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2018. The record-holding year during this period was 2016, when around 471,000 hectares (1.16 million acres) of tree cover were lost.But preliminary data for 2019 indicate this year could dramatically unseat 2016. According to the Forest and Land Audit and Social Control Authority (ABT), fires have consumed more than 953,000 hectares (2.35 million acres) of Bolivian forest so far. If these data hold true, this means that deforestation in 2019 will be more than double that of 2016 — and more than three times the 300,000 hectares (741,000 acres) lost in 2018.The lion’s share of Bolivia’s deforestation is happening in the Santa Cruz region, which comprises vast tracts of both the rainforest of the Amazon and the dry forests of the Gran Chaco. Satellite data show that Santa Cruz lost a full 10 percent of its tree cover in less than two decades. Here, too, preliminary numbers from UMD indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, according to data from NASA that show Santa Cruz fire activity in August was around three times higher than in years past.“If we take 2012 as the base year, when 128,043 hectares [316,401 acres] were deforested [in Santa Cruz], this year’s deforestation would be more than seven times greater; and if we take only the deforestation of Chiquitania, it would be three times greater,” said Pablo Solón, former Bolivian ambassador to the U.N.Satellite data show fire activity is still heavy around Roboré, but is intensifying in the northern and western portions of the Santa Cruz region. Source: NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Fire burns through forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Santa Cruz’s forests are being carved away to free up more land for soy plantations, cattle ranches, illicit coca-growing operations, and biofuel crops, as well as for the expansion of towns and smallholder farms. According to officials, the region most affected by the recent fires is a major soybean and livestock production area.“What is happening is not an accident. Five years ago, the vice president challenged agribusinesses to expand the agricultural frontier by one million hectares per year,” Solon said. “Now it has reached that figure, not of productive agricultural land but of land devastated by the flames.”Political motivationActivists say this year’s mass deforestation by fires is not only driven by economic motives, but also by political interests. In its early years, the Movement for Socialism–Political Instrument for the Sovereignty of the Peoples (MAS in Spanish) opposed biofuels. However, the group, led by Morales, later changed its platform in favor of ethanol and biodiesel, arguing that resources could be saved if Bolivia reduced its fossil fuel imports. In alliance with the country’s agroindustrial sectors, it promoted biofuel feedstock such as sugarcane as “green” energy sources.“There are direct culprits for this environmental disaster and the first one to blame is the government which has consistently passed in recent years laws of ‘forgiveness’ and promotion of the expansion of the agricultural frontier. They have also made an agricultural summit where the government, the agricultural sector of the east and communities allied to the MAS have joined,” said environmentalist Cecilia Requena. “In that summit they have decided to approve the harvest of genetically modified organisms, agrofuels, the expansion of the agricultural frontier, the export of beef to China and finally the approval of the July 9 decree that allows deforestation for agricultural purposes.”Alcides Vadillo is the regional director of the Tierra Foundation, an NGO dedicated to research into the access, use and governance of Bolivia’s land and natural resources. He says the government has been handing out areas previously classified as “permanent forest” to colonizers. “There is a lot of money at stake,” Vadillo told Mongabay.According to Requena, the government has pro-development goals that don’t mesh with 21st-century values.An ABT member assesses the impact of a fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.“This damage is irreversible and immeasurable,” Requena said. “We have no idea of ​​the dimension of the consequences, but we can say that we hope this will serve, like other disasters, to stop this suicidal drift. We need a development vision that values ​​ standing forests, not only for being vital for water but because it opens the window to an economy towards post-extractivism.”The aftermathThe Chiquitano dry forest is home to hundreds of animal and plant species, many found nowhere else in the world. In Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve alone, biologists have recorded 554 different animal species, of which 35 are endemic; 55 endemic plants have also been found there. Habitat loss is a big concern for many, as well as the outright deaths of animals and plants unable to escape the fires.“We don’t understand very well what we have lost, but we know it’s huge,” Requena said, lamenting the fires’ impacts on the region’s “enormous” biodiversity.Deforestation alerts cluster around areas previously ravaged by fire around Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve as more recent and ongoing fires encroach further into the reserve and the surrounding area. Sources: GLAD UMD and NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Volunteer firefighters battle a fire that expanded rapidly through the dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.One species affected by the fires is the plant Frailea chiquitana, a cactus endemic to Santa Cruz.“The environmental damage has been elevated to a maximum power,” said biologist Kathrin Barboza. “Of the species affected, some reproduce slowly and if they die in large quantities it can take many years to recover.” She said habitat loss that happens in isolated, unique habitats like the Chiquitano dry forest could drive species to extinction.The charred remains of animals have been found in areas affected by fire. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero.Barboza said an environmental damage assessment will be needed once the fires cease.“We have to see how many hectares of forest have been damaged and see if there are species that can be rescued,” she said, adding that the forest should be monitored and studied to determine how long it may take to recover.The region’s biodiversity isn’t the only thing affected by the fires.“Among the consequences to consider [are] impacts to soil, air (increase of greenhouse gases) and water (pollution), in addition to the loss of the landscape,” said Cecilia Tapia, an environmental engineer.The fires may be over in the near future, but their consequences will be felt for much longer. Ever Durán, the president of the College of Forest Engineers of Santa Cruz (CIF-SC), estimates that it will take around 200 years for the Chiquitano to recover.Durán added that it is imperative that the government activate the national disaster declaration protocol for fires and call for international aid, not only to extinguish the fires burning now but also to assist with mitigation of future fires and restoration of previously burned forests.A grassland area near Roboré consumed by fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Hugo Salmón, the president of the Regional Assembly of Santa Cruz, requested that the National Institute of Agrarian Reform (INRA) abolish the provision of land and the granting of settlement permits in protected areas and areas that are not already used for agricultural purposes.In response to the fires, representatives of several Santa Cruz professional associations recently issued a statement imploring the Bolivian government to stop the expansion of the agricultural frontier, and repeal laws legalizing burning in the Santa Cruz, Beni and Pando regions.“We demand and urge the government to consider that natural resources are not economic resources for a few, but [resources that support the] quality of life for all Bolivians and this will only be achieved if a sustainable framework of these resources [is maintained],” the statement reads.A plane normally used for crop-dusting is repurposed to aid firefighting near San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

International wildlife trade sweeps across ‘tree of life,’ study finds

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon About one in five land animals are caught up in the global wildlife trade, a new study has found.The research identified species traded as pets or for products they provide, and then mapped the animals’ home ranges, identifying “hotspots” around the world.The team also found that nearly 3,200 other species may be affected by the wildlife trade in the future.The study’s authors say they believe their work could help authorities protect species before trade drives their numbers down. Watching a helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) swoop through the canopy of a tropical forest sits atop the bucket list of many bird lovers. The prodigious bird cuts a striking silhouette against the sky with its bulging casque fused to its beak.But the swiftly accelerating demand, especially in China, for baubles carved from the ivory-like material of their casque has diminished the chances of seeing helmeted hornbills throughout their habitat in Southeast Asia — so much so that the IUCN now lists the species as critically endangered.“Animals are valuable on the market because they have something special — for example, brightly colored birds are in demand, as are animals that are a source of ivory,” Brett Scheffers, an ecologist and assistant professor at the University of Florida, said in a statement.Java sparrows for sale at a bird market in Purwokerto, Java, Indonesia. Image by Gabby Salazar.Shifting tastes for products and pets that come from the wild are having a sweeping impact on the vertebrate species that stalk, wriggle or fly over Earth’s surface, according to a recent analysis led by Scheffers and his colleague at Auburn University, Brunno Oliveira. The worldwide wildlife trade has ensnared around one-fifth of amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles, the study found. That’s 40 to 60 percent higher than earlier estimates, the authors write.The wildlife trade has caused more species extinctions than any other factor save habitat loss, so addressing why these animals are in such high demand will be vital to saving the nearly 5,600 species currently traded across borders, the authors say. But the study, published Oct. 4 in the journal Science, also reveals that another 3,196 species could face the threat of extinction as the wildlife trade expands to encompass products from relatives of today’s sought-after species.“If one species is traded, chances are its evolutionary cousins are also traded,” Scheffers said. “Once we discovered that pattern, we could develop a model that would predict which species would likely be traded in the future, even if they aren’t traded now.”A young helmeted hornbill. Image by Doug Janson via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).The tentacles of the wildlife trade reach far, infiltrating 65 percent of all vertebrate families.“Once one traded species is exhausted, species with similar traits will become the target of trade,” Scheffers said. “If we run out of one species of bright yellow bird, we move on to the next one most similar to it.”Scheffers and his colleagues mined lists from the IUCN and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to pick out traded species among the roughly 31,500 vertebrates contained in these databases.White-rumped shamas for sale in a bird market in Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia. Image by Gabby Salazar.They then looked at the ranges of the 5,579 traded species they identified, pinpointing a number of “hotspots” with the densest concentrations. These areas closely tracked the overall number of species living in different regions, with many of the hotspots turning up in the tropics.These hotspot maps “are an important first step,” the authors write, pointing scientists and authorities to places where they should focus efforts on stamping out wildlife trade that’s potentially driving the most species toward extinction.In a related finding, a separate study that also drew on CITES data, this time in the United States, found that countries that were the biggest source of legal wildlife products also accounted for the most illegal products confiscated by U.S. authorities.Inspection of a legal shipment of animal pelts. Image courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – Northeast Region via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).Understanding where the wildlife trade could have its greatest impact in the future could shift current approaches to protecting vulnerable species, Scheffers said.“Wildlife conservation is often reactive. Protections are put in place once a species is in danger, not before,” Scheffers said. “A species might not be of concern today, but as our study shows, that can change with shifts in supply and demand.”Banner image of a hornbill by Charles Ryan/Sticky Rice Travel. Citations:Bager Olsen, M., Geldmann, J., Harfoot, M., Tittensor, D., Price, B., Sinovas, P., . . . Burgess, N. (2019.). Thirty-six years of legal and illegal wildlife trade entering the USA. Oryx, 1-10. doi:10.1017/S0030605319000541BirdLife International. (2018). Rhinoplax vigil. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2018: e.T22682464A134206677. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T22682464A134206677.en. Downloaded on 06 October 2019.Scheffers, B. R., Oliveira, B. F., Lamb, I., & Edwards, D. P. (2019). Global wildlife trade across the tree of life. Science, 366(6461), 71 LP – 76. doi:10.1126/science.aav5327FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Extinction, Global Trade, Green, Herps, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Poaching, Reptiles, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In Indonesia, a project meant to boost livelihoods has left locals behind

first_imgIn Indonesia’s North Sulawesi province, work is underway to develop a special economic zone (SEZ) that will connect this remote region to the global economy.Plans for the SEZ include a highway linking the port of Bitung to the provincial capital, Manado; a seaport expansion to rival Jakarta’s; an industrial zone; and an airport.The development risks fragmenting the habitat of endangered and endemic species like the black macaque. Hundreds of families have also been relocated without compensation to make way for the project. BITUNG, Indonesia – Animals and humans alike have been caught by surprise the excavators, roads and factories that have appeared in the last few years in this port city in North Sulawesi, a remote corner of Indonesia.Erna Tumbelaka only found out when a photo was stuck to her front door. It set a value on her home — compensation she says she never received — and told her to move elsewhere. She and her family, like many in Indonesia, lacked official rights to the land they’ve occupied for more than a decade, making it easy for the state to take it over.Officials planning to build a 39-kilometer (24-mile) highway between the port of Bitung and the provincial capital of Manado wanted to raze her community, including the school where Erna spent a decade selling snacks to students.“We don’t know why it’s there, but if the government says build it, we must follow,” the 71-year-old says from the wood-plank shelter she built after she was evicted in 2016. Outside, the highway lies in a 200-foot (61-meter) wide gash, down a ravine. Now in the final stages of construction, it is set to open at the end of the year.Behind Erna’s home rises Mount Klabat, the highest volcano on Sulawesi Island. Klabat borders Tangkoko Nature Reserve, the home of endemic macaques, hornbills, tarsiers, cuscus and owls. Decades of creeping residential and agricultural development have squeezed the animals inside the reserve and surrounding forests almost to the point of overcrowding. As the road progresses, they are likely to lose their last chance to travel safely from the reserve to other stretches of forest they once roamed.“In some places, there will be a corridor to for species to pass through,” says John Tasirin, a biodiversity researcher and adviser to the governor. “But I think no macaques would dare pass through the villages to meet with other macaques in the south, for example.” Tasirin has been involved in the road’s planning and approved its environmental impact assessment. Despite his concerns about the road’s effect on local wildlife, he says the economic benefits outweigh the risks.For a toll, travelers will be able to travel from the urban tourism hub of Manado to a planned port and industrial area in lesser-known but geostrategic Bitung. It’s just one element of plans to turn this peninsular tip of Sulawesi into a metropolitan hub on the scale of Singapore, planners say. Four of Indonesia’s 37 priority infrastructure projects lie in this area the size of Berlin.The goal is to create one of eight national industrial areas called a special economic zone (SEZ), which includes new power plants, a seaport, airport, bridges and roads stretching around the area.Elevated sections of roadway like this one are intended to allow wildlife to pass beneath the road. But conservationists have doubts that many animals will use such passageways, particularly when they are so close to settled areas. Image by Ian Morse for Mongabay.According to Tasirin, a quest for local and national pride was part of the motivation behind the project. He says he and others from North Sulawesi watched with “jealousy” as Jakarta and Surabaya, home to the country’s two biggest ports, tapped into the country’s wealth in global trade networks.“We wanted to create something that attracts the economy to come to North Sulawesi,” Tasirin says. “Otherwise people will start to say we are not in Indonesia, because we’re far at the border.”The goal is to connect this corner of Indonesia to a globalized trade network, says Noldy Tuerah, a regional economist for the Finance Ministry and the original planner of the metropolitan hub idea beginning in 2001. Hence a seaport on the scale of Jakarta’s. But many residents, Noldy says, only focus on the immediate realities of their rice and coconut crops.“They don’t think they should know the price of coconuts in the Netherlands,” Noldy says from a cafe he frequents in Manado that looks out over the bustling city.Halfway across the 30-kilometer-wide (19-mile) peninsula, Erna sits beside her daughter Truly. If the government had asked what her family needed, Truly says she would have requested equipment for farming. As an alternative, Truly and her husband have joined an independent group of farmers that shares tools and techniques.“The government would rather meet their own needs, not ours. If we built our own homes, we could be happier,” Truly says.last_img read more

DONEGAL HAIRDRESSER ELAINE NOMINATED FOR PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL AWARD

first_imgElaine McKean, from leading hair salon, Patrick Gildea Hairdressers in Donegal, has been recognised as one of Ireland’s leading professional Hair Style Director and Colour Technician. Elaine has reached the Irish Heat of the hairdressing industry’s most prestigious competition, the Wella Professionals TrendVision Award 2014, in the Young Talent Category.Following the first round of judging for the annual Wella Professionals TrendVision Award from hundreds of entries, 30 competitors in both the Young Talent and Color categories have been chosen to go through to the Irish Heat of the industry’s most aspirational hairdressing competition. The competition is set to take place September 1st in the DoubleTree by Hilton.Judges for the Young Talent Category included Darren Ambrose, D&J Ambrose; Jake Under, HOB Academy; Nicky Clarke, Nicky Clarke; Martyn Holmes, Strangeways; and Angelo Vallillo, Zullo & Holland.Whilst Color Category judges were Brendan Fowles, Daniel Galvin; Claire Chell, Francesco Group; Hugh Campbell, Hugh Campbell Hair Group; Caroline Spencer, Sassoon; Leonardo Rizzo, Sanrizz; and Jayson Gray, TONI&GUY Academy.They were joined by a selection of Editor’s from the industry’s leading trade publications. Elaine told Donegal Daily, “I’m so proud to have been selected as a Finalist of such a prestigious competition.“I’ve always had a huge passion for hair, and I am very excited about taking part and competing against the best hairdressers in the country at the Wella Professionals TrendVision Award Ireland Heat in September.“I hope to be successfully selected to go onto compete at the UK & Ireland Final in October.GO TO THE BESTSo whether you fancy a totally new style, brand new colour, the latest celeb look, or just want advice from the hairdressing elite, book your appointment now with commented Elaine McKean at Patrick Gildea Hairdressers on 074 91 76268 DONEGAL HAIRDRESSER ELAINE NOMINATED FOR PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL AWARD was last modified: May 29th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:EntertainmentFeaturesnewslast_img read more

ICB 10 Heart Hair Clips Hair Grips Slides Snap on Clips Hair Accessories – My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfect

first_img Posted on March 1, 2018Author Nathalie DuboisCategories Clips & BarrettesTags ICB Perfect and super fast delivery. Arrived in post in good time ,well packaged. I brought a lot of these as we always seem to be hunting around the house for clips for my 5 year old. Stay in place all daya good size. Good nice brightly coloured. My daughter loves these clips. Here are the specifications for the ICB 10 Heart Hair Clips Hair Grips Slides Snap on Clips Hair Accessories:Assorted colours per cardApprox 5cm longIdeal for party bagsPlease contact us if you have a preferred style or random will be sent.Not suitable for children under 3 Good for money kids love them would buy again a lot for money. Arrived in post in good time ,well packaged. I brought a lot of these as we always seem to be hunting around the house for clips for my 5 year old. Stay in place all daya good size. Good nice brightly coloured. Reviews from purchasers :My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfectMy 3. 5 year old loves these! My daughter loves these clips. Perfect and funky colours and patterns to help step daughter enjoy using them. Very good hairclips for the price. Perfect and super fast delivery. Great product, quick delivery. My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfect. My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfect. Very dissapointed tho that their stock line has ended. My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfect. My 18 month old has such fine hair so these r perfect. Very dissapointed tho that their stock line has ended. Really pretty grips and good value for money. Really pretty grips and good value for money. The clips are good but they are bigger than i thought. Very good hairclips for the price. The clips are good but they are bigger than i thought. Good product but they are rather large, not ideal for small children’s hair which is thin. Perfect and funky colours and patterns to help step daughter enjoy using them. Good for money kids love them would buy again a lot for money. SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-03-01 08:44:39Reviewed Item 10 Heart Hair Clips Hair Grips Slides Snap on Clips Hair AccessoriesRating 3.3 / 5  stars, based on  26  reviewslast_img read more

Crops battling wet conditions around Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Jeff Duling, Putnam Co.Right now I am sidedressing some hog manure in knee high corn that is yellow. It is my worst field and I can’t stand it. It will either kill it or help it. I hope the neighbors don’t see me.Some of the corn in the better ground that was planted early is coming around and has good color. The west side of Putnam County and Van Wert County all the way up to Decatur, Indiana doesn’t look good. If you go west of Kalida there are guys that have nothing as far as corn and there is no coming back. Even their beans are terrible. I was depressed there for a while but after driving around I feel fortunate.On our farm in Van Wert County I think we got up to 15 inches in June. Beans are taking it better than I thought. These new genetics are really shining. I have faith in the beans yet.Weed control is breaking down. I sprayed about 125 acres yesterday and did some foliar feeding with manganese. We also took off around 50 acres of wheat yesterday. I was very happy with it. It came out to 87 bushels per acre and it is showing anywhere from 58.5 to 59.5 on test weight. I have been hearing rumors about vomitoxin but have not seen it.Thursday we got into our red clover. The ground conditions weren’t the greatest but we got good quality and we got it wet wrapped up by Saturday night. There is still first cutting alfalfa around here.We are going to run wheat all day today. We planted 16 acres of beans for the first time yesterday. We took prevented planting on 34 acres. It is ditched every 25 feet and there is still water laying on it. We are going to rip it, level it and get some red clover and rye on it.When you get this much rain it doesn’t matter what genetics or nitrogen source you used. I drove around and looked at fields that were plowed, fields that are in no-till, fields that use cover crops — none of it made any difference. The guys that pushed the envelope and got corn out early made the difference this year. We planted a field early by Delphos and I thought it was too wet but it is our best corn. That bigger, earlier corn could tolerate the water better.For the rest of this week’s reports, click here.last_img read more

All About Washing Machines

first_imgAbout 82% of U.S. homes have a clothes washer. Each of these appliances is used, on average, to wash about 300 loads of laundry per year. On an annual basis, residential clothes washers use more energy than dishwashers but less than refrigerators.In recent years, appliance manufacturers have developed washing machines that use less water than older models. The average full-sized front-loading Energy Star clothes washer uses about 15 gallons of water per load — and some models use less than 12 gallons — compared to about 23 gallons per load for a top-loading clothes washer without an Energy Star label.Although there are a few exceptions, most clothes washers fall into one of two categories: they are either traditional top-loading (vertical-axis) models or newer, European style front-loading (horizontal-axis) models.Front-loading machines cost more than top-loading machines, but (on average) they perform much better:[Credit for bar graph: ACEEE]Because of these many advantages, front-loading washers have acquired a dramatically increased share of the market for residential clothes washers in recent years.In 2007, after testing new energy-efficient clothes washers, Consumer Reports magazine reported that some washing machines performed poorly — in other words, they didn’t get clothes very clean.Fortunately, the magazine’s latest article on clothes washers (August 2012) reported good news: the performance problems with the first generation of energy saving washers have been solved. The authors noted that “good cleaning, high efficiency, and large capacities are common features of the newest washers.”If you have a clothes washer, you probably realize that doing a load of laundry involves the use of one, two, or three energy-using appliances:According to many writers, the most important step you can take to reduce the energy used to do a load of laundry is to switch from hot-water washing to cold-water washing. While following that advice will still… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more