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杭州夜网

EU urges dialogue in Venezuela to set up new elections

first_imgBRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is calling for political talks in Venezuela to set up new elections. The 27-nation bloc is also warning that it stands ready to slap sanctions on more senior Venezuelan officials if they undermine democracy or for any human rights violations. EU foreign ministers said Monday that “the only way out of the crisis in Venezuela is to resume political negotiations promptly.” Once a wealthy oil nation, Venezuela is mired in a deep economic crisis. The ministers say the EU cannot endorse the results of the Dec. 6 elections but stands ready to send an observer mission should new polls take place. Opposition leader Juan Guaidó’s team welcomed the statement.last_img read more

Mobile banking and member engagement

first_img continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr At this point, it is cliché to expound on the advances of mobile and its impact on financial services.The bottom line is that consumers—and, therefore, members—expect access to a wealth of information through mobile devices anytime, anywhere.Many credit unions embrace this mobile mindset, but what does that mean for engagement (and spend) in other channels?The answer can be found by tapping into the agenda-setting role mobile banking has on overall member engagement, and using those insights to drive actionable strategy.Mobile banking by the numbersNew Raddon research on mobile engagement reveals that financial institutions have expanded mobile service capabilities significantly over the past six years, and adoption has soared.last_img read more

FB : Start of spring practice provides opportunities for young defensive players

first_img Comments For Ri’Shard Anderson, Tuesday was a long time coming. After sitting on the sidelines all of last season, he just wanted to get out on the field.‘It felt good,’ said Anderson, a Syracuse rising junior cornerback. ‘Felt like I hadn’t been out there in two years. It was weird. I had to get back to my comfortable spot.’Anderson is listed as a starting cornerback on the pre-spring depth chart as Syracuse opened up spring practice Tuesday. It was the first of 15 spring practices that will culminate in SU’s annual spring game April 16. After missing all of last season with a right shoulder injury, the junior enters 2011 with a chance to step in and play immediately on a defense that ranked No. 7 in the nation a season ago.The opportunity is there for Anderson because of the turnover on defense for the Orange entering a new season. Syracuse returns just five starters on defense and none at the cornerback spot.That gives players like Anderson, and younger players such as sophomore defensive tackle Jay Bromley and sophomore linebacker Brice Hawkes, chances to step up.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘People write that it’s a challenge, but for us, for coaches, it’s exciting to bring the younger players along and develop them,’ Syracuse head coach Doug Marrone said. ‘It’s not a secret we’re going to have to develop players on the interior of the defensive line. We’re going to have to develop players at the linebacker level. … And we’ve got to develop our young players at the corner position.’The main competitors at cornerback, along with Anderson, are senior Kevyn Scott and sophomore Keon Lyn. Both also struggled with injuries last year, as Scott battled a recurring hamstring problem in the early portion of the season and Lyn was diagnosed with mononucleosis.There’s even a learning curve for some of the returning starters on defense. Marquis Spruill, who started last season as a freshman at outside linebacker, alongside seniors Derrell Smith and Doug Hogue, will move to ‘mike’ (middle) linebacker this year.With two inexperienced outside linebackers alongside him, Spruill plans on playing with the air of a veteran despite being a sophomore. But he still has to learn his new position.‘It is (rewarding), but it’s just like being a freshman all over again because being a mike in this defense is different than other defenses I’ve played on,’ Spruill said.Marrone said he hopes to see some separation among all of the young players by the end of the spring so the team can go into the preseason in August with a solid depth chart.He said that means people stepping up. People like Anderson. The cornerback suffered another injury late in Tuesday’s practice — he twisted his ankle — but he said he is fine and good to go.‘I’m amped up,’ Anderson said. ‘Ready to go get a bigger bowl game, help the team compete and have fun with the team.’Sales looks to build off Pinstripe Bowl, offseason workThree months removed from his three-touchdown performance in the Pinstripe Bowl, Marcus Sales took to the turf of Manley Field House on Tuesday to build on that afternoon.And after an offseason during which the Syracuse wide receiver said he improved his game dramatically, he was rewarded with a starting position entering 2011. The senior is ahead of junior wideout Alec Lemon, who started for much of last season. Van Chew is the other listed starting receiver.Though Sales’ rise on the depth chart is partly due to his standout performance in Syracuse’s bowl win, it’s also a credit to his work off the field in the last three months.‘Everything about me increased,’ Sales said. ‘My vertical. I got faster. I got stronger.’In 2010, Syracuse’s offense was anemic at times, especially in the passing game. But this season, the offense is the stable side of the ball for SU. Including Lemon, the Orange return eight starters on the offensive side of the ball. With just five returnees on the defensive side, Syracuse’s offense has the veterans.One of those veterans is Sales. From catching the game-winning touchdown at South Florida to nearly taking Pinstripe Bowl MVP honors, he managed to have a successful junior campaign after beginning the year off of the two-deep depth chart.This year, he’s focused on helping take the offense to the next level.‘As a senior I know I got to come up and be more of a leader and be more vocal, lead by my actions,’ Sales said. ‘It feels good to know that I got younger players that look up to me. They’re just depending on me to do the right thing, and I just got to help them to get where I’m at right now.’This and thatA handful of players did not practice Tuesday, including Chandler Jones, who was afflicted with a stomach bug, and Brice Hawkes, who was suspended for the first three practices for a team violation, Marrone said. … Syracuse’s three practices this week on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday will be in Manley Field House due to the snowstorm, Marrone said. After Spring Break, practices will take place at Schwartzwalder-Katz Fields. … The Orange will hold one practice in Rochester at Sahlen’s Field on March [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on March 8, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: [email protected] | @mark_cooperjrlast_img read more

Land thieves ramp up deforestation in Brazil’s Jamanxim National Forest

first_imgBanner image: Deforestation by illegal loggers in Jamanxim National Forest in Pará state, Brazil. Image courtesy of IBAMA.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Cattle, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Land Grabbing, Politics, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Soy, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Deforestation appears to be rising dramatically in Brazil, with satellite data showing the country’s Amazonian region lost more forest in May than during any other month in the past decade.Jamanxim National Forest, in the state of Pará, has been particularly hard hit, losing more than 3 percent of its forest cover in May. Another surge was detected during the last week of June.Residents say the pressure facing Jamanxim comes from outsiders who are looking to make a profit by logging trees and then selling the newly cleared land to ranchers.Many of those living in protected areas believe that the political climate under President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration is encouraging the invasions by loggers into Brazil’s protected areas. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has started to increase very rapidly, with 73,900 hectares (182,600 acres) of forest felled in the single month of May this year. May is always a month when deforestation rises, because it marks the end of the rainy season for much of Amazônia, but this year’s figure is a 34 percent increase over May 2018, when 55,000 hectares (135,900 acres) were felled. According to DETER (System of Detection of Deforestation in Real Time), which compiled the data, it’s the highest single-month figure in more than a decade.The DETER figure for accumulated deforestation from end of August 2018 to end of May 2019, compared with the same period in 2017/2018, shows a much more modest rise, from 348,700 hectares (836,946 acres) to 365,470 hectares (903,096 acres), an increase of 4.8 percent. The May 2019 figure supports anecdotal evidence that land thieves have become much more aggressive this year.“If this upward curve continues, we could have a bad year for the Amazon forest,” Claudio Almeida, the head of satellite monitoring at INPE, the Brazilian aerospace institute, which runs DETER, told Reuters. “It will depend on how much policing there is in the next two critical months,” he added. However, with the current state of paralysis within the country’s main environmental agencies, it seems unlikely that the authorities will be cracking down heavily on illegal deforesters in the coming months.The Jamanxim River hems the eastern side of Jamanxim National Forest, one of the most threatened protected areas in Brazil. Image by IBAMA via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).DETER recommends caution in the use of its data, because its satellite-imaging technology can’t penetrate thick cloud and so can be inaccurate. The official annual figures on how much forest has been felled in Amazônia are calculated with the use of different methodology, known as PRODES, and are published at the end of July, also by INPE.However, DETER’s data are widely regarded as a reliable indicator of trends, and the system is currently detecting high levels of deforestation in protected areas — national forests, national parks and indigenous areas. Even though under Brazilian law, these are clearly signposted as no-go areas for deforesters, land thieves and loggers have increasingly moved into them: according to figures from Imazon, the Institute for the Man and Environment in Amazonia, a nonprofit that promotes sustainability in the Amazon, deforestation in protected areas rose from 7 percent of total deforestation in 2008 to 13 percent in 2017.Many of those living in protected areas believe that the political climate under the administration of President Jair Bolsonaro is encouraging the invasions by loggers into protected areas.“All this hostile talk about the indigenous people from the new government is encouraging invasions,” Awapu Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau, a leader of the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau people, told the NGO Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA). The critical period for this people, who live in Rondônia in the west of the Brazilian Amazon, begins in April when the end of the rainy season provides a dry window for invaders, and continues until October when the rains begin to fall again. According to the Kanindé Association, a nonprofit that monitors deforestation in the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau Indigenous Territory, about 180 outsiders illegally invaded the reserve in April. Ivaneide Bandeira, Kanindé’s coordinator, says that Bolsonaro’s announcement that he would be redrawing the boundaries of some indigenous reserves encouraged the illegal invasions.DETER’s data show that the protected areas under greatest pressure are in Pará state in the east of the Amazon Basin, where the economic frontier is advancing rapidly and land prices are rocketing. Of the 10 protected areas in the Amazon with the highest levels of deforestation, eight are located in Pará. The area being most heavily despoiled is Jamanxim National Forest, where 44,800 hectares (110,700 acres) of forest were illegally felled in May alone.In other words, Jamanxim lost more than 3 percent of its tree cover in just one month. Considerably less damage occurred in the next most threatened protected area — the Tapajós Area of Environmental Protection — which, proportionally, experienced less than a quarter of Jamanxim’s deforestation rate in May.While forest loss slowed somewhat in Jamanxim in June, satellite data collated by the University of Maryland recorded around 22,000 deforestation alerts. Most of these occurred in the last week of the month, indicating another hike in clearance may be in store for July.Data from the University of Maryland visualized on Global Forest Watch show the majority of June deforestation in Jamanxim National Forest was recorded at the very end of the month. This forest loss is edging into an intact forest landscape (IFL), one of the few undegraded IFLs remaining in the national forest.Area cleared within Jamanxim National Forest. Photo courtesy of OEco.Jamanxim National Forest is a dramatic example of what can happen to a protected area when it is deprived of effective policing, which is the situation that INPE’s Claudio Almeida was describing. Jamanxim National Forest was created in February 2006 as part of a package of measures to prevent deforestation along the BR-163, a 1,765-kilometer (1,097-mile) highway that links Cuiabá, the capital of Mato Grosso state, with the port of Santarém on the Amazon River. Soy farmers from Mato Grosso, which had just become Brazil’s main soy-producing state, were pressing for the road to be asphalted so that they could export the soy along the Amazon River instead of having to send it to ports in the south of the country, which incurred heavy transport costs.The government agreed to the farmers’ demand and, to placate environmentalists who were concerned that the road would lead to high levels of deforestation, launched with considerable fanfare the Sustainable BR-163 Plan, which, it claimed, would demonstrate once and for all that the paving of roads and forest protection were compatible.But this plan was soon eclipsed by the Program for the Acceleration of Growth (PAC), announced in 2007, which, with even more publicity and far greater resources, promoted investment in infrastructure, with scant mention of environmental protection.Juan Doblas, who at the time was monitoring regional deforestation for ISA, said: “Ten years [after the Sustainable BR-163 was announced] the levels of deforestation were as bad as in our worst projections … The loss of forest was so out of control that for every year between 2004 and 2013 — except 2005 — while deforestation in Amazonia as a whole fell, it increased in the region around the BR-163.”One of the most heavily invaded areas was Jamanxim National Forest, which covers 1.3 million hectares (3.2 million acres). On paper, it enjoys rigorous protection; only small-scale deforestation, carried out by traditional communities and researchers, is permitted. Although officials from the environmental agency, IBAMA, tried to apprehend invaders, they didn’t have the resources to do the job properly. Land thieves continued to enter, at times threatening IBAMA officials, and they began to put pressure on federal deputies to put a bill through Congress that would remove the protected status from a large section of the national forest and reclassify it so that their occupation could become legal. In 2009 they called for 305,000 hectares (735,700 acres) of the national forest to be turned into an area of environmental protection (APA), a much less restrictive form of conservation unit where faming and mining are permitted.A white-nosed saki (Chiropotes albinasus), one of the species that lives in Jamanxim National Forest. Photo by Valdir Hobus via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).One of the main lobbyists for the reclassification was Ubiraci da Silva, known as Macarrão, the mayor of Novo Progresso, a frontier town on the BR-163 in Pará state. Founded in 1991, the town sprang up around a clandestine land strip built to promote a rapid way in and out for those engaged in illegal logging and gold mining.During the soy harvest, truck after truck trundles through the town, leaving clouds of hot dust. Macarrão says that the town needs to exploit Jamanxim’s resources in order to survive.“We are becoming nothing more than a transport corridor,” he complained to the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper. “We are hemmed in on one side by an indigenous reserve and it’s only on the other side, near Jamanxim National Forest, that we can produce. If the government doesn’t give in to our demand [to reduce the size of the national forest], our town will die.”Some of the main businessmen and politicians in Novo Progresso would benefit personally from the creation of the APA. Imazon investigated and found that 71,000 hectares (175,400 acres) of the 305,00 hectares (735,700 acres) had been illegally occupied, most of it after the area had been turned into a national forest. IBAMA had issued 334 fines for illegal deforestation. Both Macarrão and Ezequiel Antonio Castanha, the owner of a large supermarket in Novo Progresso and considered by the Federal Prosecution Service (MPF) as one of the biggest land thieves in the Amazon, were fined, though it seems that the fines were never paid. In 2014, IBAMA, the Federal Police and the MPF launched Operation Castanheira (named after Castanha), an ambitious but ultimately unsuccessful attempt to break up the land-stealing gang. Castanha was arrested but later released.The land thieves are not grabbing land to farm it themselves, but have realized that, by deforesting it and selling it on, they can make a vast amount of money. One resident, who preferred to speak off the record, explained to Mongabay how it works:“Land theft is part of the process of occupying the region around Novo Progresso. What is land theft? It’s an easy way of making money. The land grabber takes over an area of forest, generally forest that is worth very little, and deforests it. He doesn’t want to farm it himself but to sell it on. He deforests it very cheaply, using poorly paid labor, plants pasture and then sells it to a rancher who really wants to use the land. This process has been going for a decade or more. And the land increases in value by an absurd amount. Standing forest is almost worthless. Once it is cleared of vegetation, it increases in value 100 or 200 times.”At the end of 2016, after heavy lobbying, the administration of then President Michel Temer gave way to the demands of the land thieves. Temer sent a bill, MP 756, to Congress to reduce the size of Jamanxim National Forest. Environmentalists protested vociferously and the government withdrew the project. But Heron Martins, a researcher at Imazon, says he believes the bickering has only encouraged further illegal invasions.“Every time the government puts forward a bill or emits a sign that it is in favor of a reduction [in the size of the forest], expectations increase and the number of illegal occupations grows, [even if eventually the initiative is abandoned],” Martins said.In April 2108 the Supreme Federal Court, Brazil’s court of last resort, ruled in a unanimous vote that it was unconstitutional to reduce the size of protected areas by means of a kind of presidential decree called a provisional measure. But the decision has had little impact on the ground, with land thieves confident that eventually their exploitation of the forest will be legalized. The invasions are accelerating, as indicated by the recent figures.What is happening in Jamanxim National Forest may be particularly shocking, but it is not an isolated case. On June 5, World Environment Day, the Amazonian Network of Georeferenced Socioenvironmental Information RAISG), which brings together researchers from six Amazonian countries, published a series of maps showing that at least 69 percent of the region’s protected areas, including indigenous reserves, are under some kind of pressure. Its maps encompass the eight countries of Panamazônia, and can be found in a multimedia platform titled Amazônia at a Crossroads. Their conclusion: that the Amazon region is under pressure as never before.last_img read more

Film that fish: Stereo-video speeds surveys of marine fish communities

first_imgResearchers use underwater visual surveys to assess the sizes of fish in marine communities and their associated habitats, but diver-based data collection is time-consuming and requires expertise, and results may vary among different data collectors.A multinational research team recently published the first guide to help researchers using diver-operated stereo-video methods (stereo-DOVs) to standardize surveys of fish assemblages (species and their abundances) and their associated habitat.The video provides a permanent, shareable record of each survey transect, including the species and numbers of fish seen, while the stereo option allows researchers to measure fish using overlapping images.The guide provides information on appropriate equipment; designing a stereo‐DOV if needed; operating it during underwater studies; processing the video data after collection; and analyzing fish behavior, population features and habitat in the resulting video. Marine biologists survey fish assemblages and their associated habitat to understand the ecosystem of a place, compare fish communities over time or in response to changes in management, and examine fish behavior.These researchers typically survey fish communities through underwater visual censuses, in which a diver identifies and counts fishes within an area, usually determined by a predefined route, or transect. The method is a straightforward, non-destructive way to survey fish.Yellow wrasse in the Florida Keys. While not fearful of divers, smaller fish can remain hidden behind sponges and corals during a survey. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.However, studies have shown variability among different underwater data collectors and inaccuracies in estimating the length and numbers of fish in the sample area. Swimming a predefined route while simultaneously identifying, counting and estimating the size of fish is difficult and requires extensive training and experience. Moreover, researchers in different places conduct data collection transects in different ways.All this variation among surveys has made it difficult to either synthesize or compare findings from various sites and time periods.A multinational research team has recently examined how some of these limitations can be overcome or reduced by updating underwater surveys through the incorporation of diver‐operated stereo‐video, or stereo‐DOV. Their new scientific publication explains this method and provides a guide for researchers wanting to add the technology to their fish community transect surveys.Surveying with video instead of pencilThe authors, from Australia, the U.S. and New Caledonia, explain that the size and cost of video cameras have decreased in recent years, allowing researchers to put together a rig that a single diver can maneuver as they follow a predetermined underwater route, or transect.A scuba diver conducting a stereo-DOV survey at Mo’orea, French Polynesia. Image courtesy of Lauric Thiault.Swimming along a transect with the stereo-video rig is the most common application of the technology, but as video quality has also improved over this period, researchers can better detect, measure and identify fish, as well as record and better determine fish behavior.The authors include in their guide information on appropriate equipment; designing a stereo‐DOV if needed; operating it during underwater studies (keep that camera pointing forward!); processing the video data after collection; and analyzing fish behavior, population features and habitat in the resulting video.No clear guidelines currently exist for surveying with stereo-video, so the authors’ aim in providing a standardized set of procedures for stereo-DOV surveys is to encourage survey and behavioral data collectors to follow the same process. Reducing variation among locations and data collectors allows researchers to more easily compare findings and synthesize data from different locations and time periods to help answer broad‐scale ecological questions.The method works through stereophotogrammetry, which estimates the three-dimensional coordinates of points on an object (e.g. a fish) using measurements made in two or more images taken from different positions. The system uses two cameras attached to a bar, set 800 millimeters (31 inches) apart and turned inward just slightly so their visual fields overlap. Like our own visual system, this slight spatial difference allows stereo “vision.” The authors describe several software applications designed to help researchers identify common points on the object in each image, overlap the images based on these points, and measure the size of the fish or other object.The authors recommend using a video camera with a full high-definition resolution of at least 1920 by 1080 pixels that can record at speeds of at least 60 frames per second. The camera must also have the option to disable auto focus and video stabilization, which can invalidate stereo-video measurements. While the authors state that most divers can easily learn to use a stereo-DOV, they must prepare and calibrate the system before each dive.Filmed surveys allow repeat viewsRecording an underwater survey with high-definition video enables divers to complete a transect more quickly than when they have to detect each individual or school of fish and take notes on the species, and their estimates of the numbers and size of the many fish they may spot.While you focus on counting the jacks above, don’t overlook the shark below. Image courtesy of Mr. Cha, South Korea.Recorded video shows species, abundance, diversity and size of fish along both sides of a transect, even with the lens pointed straight ahead. The stereo-video further permits measurement of fish and other objects. Comparing numbers and size of fish over time can indicate impact of management activities, such as a marine protected area or quota on the harvesting of algae-eating species.The ever higher-definition video improves analysis of fish behavior, which can advance research, as well as show any fear fish have of humans in the water. Fish are usually relaxed, and fear suggests that spearfishing or other destructive practices are occurring in the area.The footage provides a permanent searchable, shareable record of the site, including not only the fish species and habitat features but also the context, such as coral condition and water clarity. The video can be checked again at any time and allows multiple researchers to view and comment on the findings.Filmed surveys require time and precise equipmentThe stereo-DOV system must be stable enough to conduct stereo photogrammetry underwater. The authors recommend purchasing a commercial system from a recognized provider, though they offer detailed instructions on building one’s own system.Stereo-DOV surveys require some basic equipment, including the stereo-DOV system (a) with a stabilizing arm (b), two video cameras, memory cards and reader (c, e), a cotton thread distance counter (d), marking tags (f), batteries and charger (h,i), a dive float (j), and spares of everything. Image © Goetze et al., 2019.Adding stereo-DOV to surveys still requires one or more divers going to each site and spending time in the water, which can be relatively costly and time-consuming, depending on the location and availability of trained divers.The diver’s immediate presence may frighten certain shy fish, but that’s true for visual censuses as well. Similarly, both standard and video-based surveys have trouble detecting fish that are cryptic or hide under corals during the day.Environmental DNA (eDNA) has become increasingly useful for determining the presence and community composition of aquatic species, including corals. Although collecting species DNA from a water sample is quick, cheaper and easier than from a diver-based survey, even one collecting video data, it cannot measure everything. Fish in a given area don’t necessarily poop or shed scales or mucus at the same rate, for instance, and few studies have shown reliable links between fish abundance or biomass and presence of eDNA.Could you count all these barracuda while sticking to the transect route? Recorded video of the school would enable repeat views and the chance to estimate numbers and sizes of the fish. Image courtesy of Mr. Cha, South Korea.In their paper, the authors encourage divers surveying fish assemblages using stereo‐DOVs to adopt the guidelines, given the various advantages they describe. “An increased uptake of this methodology, following the standard procedures described herein,” they write, “will reduce variation in methodology, assist in the synthesis of data on continental and global scales and provide accurate information to improve fisheries management and conservation.Citation:Goetze, J. S., Bond, T., Mclean, D. L., Saunders, B. J., Langlois, T. J., Lindfield, S., . . . Harvey, E. S. (2019). A field and video analysis guide for diver operated stereo‐video. Methods in Ecology and Evolution. doi:10.1111/2041-210x.13189FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, cameras, Conservation Solutions, data collection, Fish, Marine Animals, Monitoring, Oceans, Research, Saltwater Fish, Software, Surveying, surveys, Technology, Wildtech last_img read more

Asian otters gain protection from the pet trade

first_imgArticle published by Erik Hoffner Animals, Cites, Conservation, Environment, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Pet Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade The smooth-coated otter and the Asian small-clawed otter are now on the CITES list of animals with the highest level of protection from the wildlife trade.Asian small-clawed otters are particularly sought after as domestic pets and for ‘otter cafés,’ where wild otters are forced to interact with paying customers.Conservationists say that a trade ban was vital for the survival of the two species, whose numbers in the wild have fallen by at least 30% in the past 30 years. Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted to place the smooth-coated otter and the Asian small-clawed otter on the list of animals with the highest level of protection from the wildlife trade.The recent CITES Conference of the Parties (CoP18) in Geneva, Switzerland considered many proposals and issued new protections for numerous species including giraffes, sharks and rays, and many more. CITES does not determine the risk of extinction of species, which is the domain of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and its Red List of Threatened Species, but rather CITES’ role is to ensure that international trade in wild animals does not threaten their survival in the wild.Conservationists insisted a trade ban was vital for the survival of the two species, whose numbers in the wild have fallen by at least 30% in the past 30 years.When asked how important the actions are, Paul Todd, Senior Attorney for the Nature Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told Mongabay, “The Appendix I listings for small-clawed and smooth coated otters were a vital step in reversing the decline of these species throughout their range. The range countries will have to take added measures to reduce poaching and enforce against illegal trade in the species, and the listing sends the right signals to the marketplace that these species are in trouble and are not available for use as pets or for other reasons.”A formerly wild otter in a Tokyo café bites its tail, a sign of stress. Image by Aaron Gekoski for World Animal Protection.The pet trade that supplies phenomena like ‘otter cafés’ in Japan, where customers can handle otters plucked from the wild as pups, is the most visible reminder of these animals’ plight. In these establishments, otters can be heard whimpering, shrieking and making distress calls while customers are interacting with them.Aaron Gekoski, one of the filmmakers behind the recent investigative documentary “Pet otters: the truth behind the latest wildlife craze,” told Mongabay, “During our investigation it became evident quite quickly that otters do not make good pets.” [See that interview and Gekoski’s sobering images here.]Good pets or bad ones, do these actions protect these species being trafficked for otter cafés and for the pet trade?“Yes,” says NRDC’s Todd. “Asian small-clawed otters in particular are taken as pups for use as pets and attractions, in large part because they are the smallest of the otter species and their range is nearest to where the demand is highest, especially Japan.” But, he continued, “Smooth-coated otters and even the rarest of all otters, the hairy-nosed otter, have been found in trade, including trade in live animals.”Despite these truths, the conservationist is hopeful: “The Appendix I listing will help increase enforcement attention and ensure that any trade in captive bred specimens is from legitimate sources, not from the wild.”That remains to be seen, but it’s certain that these Asian otters need all the help they can get.Banner image: Internet star Takechiyo lives in a private home and here takes a rare break from play. His owner warns against keeping otters as pets. Image by Aaron Gekoski for World Animal Protection.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

International wildlife trade sweeps across ‘tree of life,’ study finds

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon About one in five land animals are caught up in the global wildlife trade, a new study has found.The research identified species traded as pets or for products they provide, and then mapped the animals’ home ranges, identifying “hotspots” around the world.The team also found that nearly 3,200 other species may be affected by the wildlife trade in the future.The study’s authors say they believe their work could help authorities protect species before trade drives their numbers down. Watching a helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) swoop through the canopy of a tropical forest sits atop the bucket list of many bird lovers. The prodigious bird cuts a striking silhouette against the sky with its bulging casque fused to its beak.But the swiftly accelerating demand, especially in China, for baubles carved from the ivory-like material of their casque has diminished the chances of seeing helmeted hornbills throughout their habitat in Southeast Asia — so much so that the IUCN now lists the species as critically endangered.“Animals are valuable on the market because they have something special — for example, brightly colored birds are in demand, as are animals that are a source of ivory,” Brett Scheffers, an ecologist and assistant professor at the University of Florida, said in a statement.Java sparrows for sale at a bird market in Purwokerto, Java, Indonesia. Image by Gabby Salazar.Shifting tastes for products and pets that come from the wild are having a sweeping impact on the vertebrate species that stalk, wriggle or fly over Earth’s surface, according to a recent analysis led by Scheffers and his colleague at Auburn University, Brunno Oliveira. The worldwide wildlife trade has ensnared around one-fifth of amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles, the study found. That’s 40 to 60 percent higher than earlier estimates, the authors write.The wildlife trade has caused more species extinctions than any other factor save habitat loss, so addressing why these animals are in such high demand will be vital to saving the nearly 5,600 species currently traded across borders, the authors say. But the study, published Oct. 4 in the journal Science, also reveals that another 3,196 species could face the threat of extinction as the wildlife trade expands to encompass products from relatives of today’s sought-after species.“If one species is traded, chances are its evolutionary cousins are also traded,” Scheffers said. “Once we discovered that pattern, we could develop a model that would predict which species would likely be traded in the future, even if they aren’t traded now.”A young helmeted hornbill. Image by Doug Janson via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).The tentacles of the wildlife trade reach far, infiltrating 65 percent of all vertebrate families.“Once one traded species is exhausted, species with similar traits will become the target of trade,” Scheffers said. “If we run out of one species of bright yellow bird, we move on to the next one most similar to it.”Scheffers and his colleagues mined lists from the IUCN and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to pick out traded species among the roughly 31,500 vertebrates contained in these databases.White-rumped shamas for sale in a bird market in Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia. Image by Gabby Salazar.They then looked at the ranges of the 5,579 traded species they identified, pinpointing a number of “hotspots” with the densest concentrations. These areas closely tracked the overall number of species living in different regions, with many of the hotspots turning up in the tropics.These hotspot maps “are an important first step,” the authors write, pointing scientists and authorities to places where they should focus efforts on stamping out wildlife trade that’s potentially driving the most species toward extinction.In a related finding, a separate study that also drew on CITES data, this time in the United States, found that countries that were the biggest source of legal wildlife products also accounted for the most illegal products confiscated by U.S. authorities.Inspection of a legal shipment of animal pelts. Image courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – Northeast Region via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).Understanding where the wildlife trade could have its greatest impact in the future could shift current approaches to protecting vulnerable species, Scheffers said.“Wildlife conservation is often reactive. Protections are put in place once a species is in danger, not before,” Scheffers said. “A species might not be of concern today, but as our study shows, that can change with shifts in supply and demand.”Banner image of a hornbill by Charles Ryan/Sticky Rice Travel. Citations:Bager Olsen, M., Geldmann, J., Harfoot, M., Tittensor, D., Price, B., Sinovas, P., . . . Burgess, N. (2019.). Thirty-six years of legal and illegal wildlife trade entering the USA. Oryx, 1-10. doi:10.1017/S0030605319000541BirdLife International. (2018). Rhinoplax vigil. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2018: e.T22682464A134206677. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T22682464A134206677.en. Downloaded on 06 October 2019.Scheffers, B. R., Oliveira, B. F., Lamb, I., & Edwards, D. P. (2019). Global wildlife trade across the tree of life. Science, 366(6461), 71 LP – 76. doi:10.1126/science.aav5327FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Extinction, Global Trade, Green, Herps, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Poaching, Reptiles, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New toads named from a Sumatran biodiversity trove that’s under threat

first_imgResearchers have recently described three new species of toads belonging to the Sigalegalephrynus genus of puppet toads living in the highlands of Indonesia’s Sumatra Island.The genus was first proposed in 2017 with the description of two species. Researchers believe there may be even more puppet toads left to discover.The discovery highlights the vast diversity of Sumatra’s herpetofauna, but also the immense threats the island’s wildlife faces, primarily from loss of habitat to deforestation and agriculture.The researchers say all of the newly described species should be listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List. In 2017, a group of researchers working in Indonesia announced they had identified a new genus of tree-dwelling toads living in forests and caves on the mountaintops of Indonesia’s Sumatra Island.Their paper at the time identified two species belonging to what they described as the genus Sigalegalephrynus, or puppet toads, named after the Sigale-gale puppets used in local funerary traditions. Now, in a new paper published in October 2019, the team has described three additional species belonging to the genus, highlighting the stunning and largely underexplored diversity of reptiles and amphibians in Sumatra.“Sumatra is one of the islands of the world that harbor highest level of biodiversity and we are convinced that we barely scratched the surface of it,” said lead author Goutam Sarker, a herpetologist at the University of Texas at Arlington, in an email to Mongabay. “Very confidently, we can say there are many more new taxa awaiting discovery.”The research team conducted surveys between 2013 and 2016, funded by a grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation. The team, which includes scientists from research institutes in Indonesia, the United States and Germany, spent 178 days in the field collecting samples. Conditions were often grueling; Sarker recalls falling backward off a “3.5-4 meter high” cliff, about 12 feet, during a nighttime survey in Aceh province. A backpack full of air-filled specimen bags cushioned his fall. “Otherwise, I would be dead,” Sarker recalls.But the work paid off.The five species identified as belonging to the genus Sigalegalephrynus were each found in a single habitat in Indonesia’s Sumatra Island. Image courtesy of Goutam Sarker.The team’s first batch of analyses, based on samples collected in 2013 and 2014, led to the proposal of the new genus and the description of two species in 2017: the Mandailing puppet toad (Sigalegalephrynus mandailinguensis) and Minangkabau puppet toad (S. minangkabauensi).Analysis of a second batch of samples, collected in 2015, resulted in the description of three new species: the Burning Mountain puppet toad (S. burnitelongensis), Gayo Lues puppet toad (S. gayoluesensis), and Harvey’s puppet toad (S. harveyi).The newly described toads are small (adults measure less than 40 millimeters, or 1.6 inches), have distinctly shaped finger pads and foot webbing, have unique mating calls, and live in trees and caves, setting them apart from other toad genera found in Sumatra. The known species within the genus exhibit clear genetic lineages, with the newly described Gayo Lues and Burning Mountain puppet toads forming a northern branch of the genus, and Harvey’s puppet toad joining the two previously described species in a southern branch.One of the distinguishing features of the proposed genus Sigalegalephrynus is its distinctive metacarpal tubercle, highlighted here. Image courtesy of Goutam Sarker.And the researchers believe there are more species yet to be identified. “I am very positive that new species of this genus will be discovered by other research groups soon,” Sarker says. In fact, he notes that based on a recent analysis, his team believes they may already have a sample of yet another species in their own collection.The newly-described Harvey’s puppet toad (S. harveyi). Its only known habitat is the montane cloudforest on the southeastern slopes of Mount Dempo in South Sumatra. Image by Eric N. Smith.Diversity under threatSarker says the researchers were “astonished” at the micro-endemic nature of the species they observed, meaning that each species appears to be restricted to a tiny, specific location.Historical geological events likely played a major role. Many studies have shown that when sea levels were higher, Sumatra’s lowland forests were underwater, transforming upland areas into isolated islands, Sarker says. “Also, maybe, since these are highland species they did not came down and interbreed when sea level dropped.”The extremely small range of each species means that they are highly vulnerable to any changes in their home environment. And today, that vulnerability is increasing as pressure rises on the ecosystem due to deforestation, agriculture — notably oil palm and coffee cultivation — and expanding human settlement.The Burning Mountain puppet toad (S. burnitelongensis), has been found only in forest patches near small streams and surrounded by coffee plantations at Mount Burni Telong, near the village of Rambune in Aceh province. Image by Eric N. Smith.In addition to describing the three new species, the team’s October paper also calls for all five member of the Sigalegalephrynus genus to be listed as endangered species by the IUCN. “I have no reservation to say that all these toads should be placed, at least,into the Endangered category if not Critically Endangered of the IUCN Red List,” Sarker says.“Sadly, almost 80-90% of Sumatra’s rainforests have been replaced with palm oil plantations,” says Michael Harvey, a herpetologist at Broward College in the U.S, and one of the recipients of the grant that funded the Sumatra survey work (and the namesake of Harvey’s puppet toad). “Discovery of these toads suggests that many more new reptiles and amphibians occur on Sumatra than previously thought. With current rates of deforestation, many of these animals will likely go extinct before they are discovered.”Banner image: The Gayo Lues puppet toad (S. gayoluesensis),  only known to live above Kenyaran Pantan Cuaca village in Aceh province’s Gayo Lues regency, by Eric N. Smith.Citation:Sarker, G. C., Wostl, E., Thammachoti, P., Sidik, I., Hamidy, A., Kurniawan, N., & Smith, E. N. (2019). New species, diversity, systematics, and conservation assessment of the puppet toads of Sumatra (Anura: Bufonidae: Sigalegalephrynus). Zootaxa, 4679(2), 365-391. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4679.2.9This article was updated to correct the height of the cliff researcher Goutam Sarker fell from.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Herps, New Species, Wildlife last_img read more

Brazil’s ‘coconut breakers’ feel the squeeze of Cerrado development

first_imgThese coconut breakers rely on the babassu palm and its harvest of oil-rich nuts for their traditional sustainable livelihood.Many of these women live on the edge of the Matopiba region, dubbed by some as “the world’s last agricultural frontier” which has seen an almost 300 percent increase in soy expansion over the last two decades, most of which came at the expense of native forests and vegetation.In recent years, industrial agribusiness has moved in fast, privatizing and fencing the commons, converting the babassu palm groves to soy and eucalyptus plantations and cattle ranches, and making it harder for the coconut breakers to access the palm from which they derive their living, and their social and cultural identity.In addition, the women say they have been increasingly exposed to threats, intimidation, and physical and sexual violence by farmers and other male agribusiness workers. But the coconut breakers are determined to defend their palm groves at any cost, and to resist the enclosure of the commons. Access to babassu palm trees is essential to the livelihoods of 400,000 Brazilian women, but industrial agribusiness expansion is putting those livelihoods at grave risk. Image by Yndara Vasques courtesy of MIQCB.A Mongabay team, Sarah Sax and Maurício Angelo, recently traveled to the Brazilian Cerrado to report on the impacts of booming agribusiness on the savanna environment and on the traditional people living there. This is the first story in a series telling what they found there.Every September for half a century, Maria Antônia Trindade Mendes has started the babassu harvest season in the same simple way.She ties a bag crafted from babassu palm fronds around her waist and walks out with a group of women from Quilombo São Caetano de Matinha (a Brazilian settlement made up of 200 runaway slave descendants), to the palm groves surrounding their community. There, where the northern edge of the Cerrado savanna blends with the Amazon rainforest, the women gather basketsful of babassu nuts — small, brown oblongs, resembling coconuts.Later, Trindade Mendes takes each fist-sized nut she’s gathered and, with the grace of someone who has repeated the same motion thousands of times over five decades, cracks it open to extract the half-dozen or so kernels within. These she sells to a cooperative that separates the oil for use in cooking or beauty products. The babassu harvest lasts six months, and the money earned must support her family for an entire year.But this August, Trindade Mendes wasn’t preparing for the babassu harvest season. Instead, she was in Brasilia taking part for the first time in the “Daisies’ March,” Latin America’s largest demonstration organized by female rural workers that happens every 3-4 years. There, amid the dust, shouting and clamor, the unique hats of the “coconut breakers” could be seen streaming in and out of the vendor exhibit hall, and to and from the temporary camp that housed the roughly 100,000 women attending from across Brazil.Trindade Mendes took to the streets this year to protest threats to herself, her livelihood and to her traditional way of life: especially the increasing violence directed at coconut breakers, and the ongoing privatization of the common land on which babassu groves grow.“Before we lived free, went out at night, and during the day. We were not afraid,” she says. “Now, they are taking away everything. The only things that have rights are cattle and agribusiness.”last_img read more

Audio: Ami Vitale on how meeting Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, changed her life

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bears, Elephants, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Indigenous Peoples, Photography, Podcast, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Ami Vitale, a photographer for National Geographic who documented the death of the last male northern white rhino, Sudan.As celebrated as her nature and wildlife photography is, Vitale started off as a war zone photographer. She came to realize that humanity’s strained relationship with the natural world was behind each of the human conflicts she covered, however, and then, when she first met Sudan in 2009, she was moved to focus on nature photography.On today’s episode, Vitale tells us about how meeting Sudan changed her life and discusses a few more of the stories she’s documented throughout her highly decorated career, including China’s efforts to rehab its panda population and the wildlife sanctuary in Kenya that rescues orphaned elephants and helps them return to the wild. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Ami Vitale, a photographer for National Geographic who documented the death of the last male northern white rhino, Sudan.Listen here: Ami Vitale’s work for National Geographic magazine and many other publications has taken her to over 100 countries and won her numerous awards. She’s been named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographer’s Association, received the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting, and won five prizes from World Press Photos, including 1st Prize for her story about the first ever community owned and operated elephant sanctuary in Africa. She was even named one of 50 Badass Women by Instyle Magazine along with the likes of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Madeleine Albright, and former Mongabay Newscast guests Jane Goodall and Margaret Atwood.As celebrated as her nature and wildlife photography is, however, Vitale started off as a war zone photographer. She came to realize that humanity’s strained relationship with the natural world was behind each of the human conflicts she covered, however, and then, when she first met Sudan in 2009, she was moved to focus on nature photography.On today’s episode, Vitale tells us about how meeting Sudan changed her life and discusses a few more of the stories she’s documented throughout her highly decorated career, including China’s efforts to rehab its panda population and the wildlife sanctuary in Kenya that rescues orphaned elephants and helps them return to the wild.Here’s this episode’s top news:Study declares ancient Chinese paddlefish extinct‘Tainted timber’ from Myanmar widely used in yachts seized in the NetherlandsNew monkey discovered on “island” amid deforestation in BrazilAmi Vitale. Photo courtesy of Ami Vitale.A panda keeper does a health check on the cub of giant panda Xi Mei at the Wolong Nature Reserve managed by the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda in Sichuan province, China. October 31, 2015. Photo by Ami Vitale.Joseph Wachira saying goodbye to Sudan. Photo by Ami Vitale.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more