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苏州桑拿

Professor publishes book on the homeless

first_imgWhenever a serious crime is committed, members of the surrounding community are plagued by burning questions regarding who is responsible, why the incident occurred and how it could have been prevented. In his new book “Homeless Come Home: An Advocate, the Riverbank, and Murder in Topeka, Kansas,” professor Benedict Giamo examined these complex questions in the context of the story of David Owen, an advocate for the homeless who was brutally murdered in 2006 by members of the community he aimed to help. Giamo has studied homelessness since the 1970s, but he was drawn to Owen’s story by the blurred line between victim and perpetrator. “Most of the time, the homeless are the victims, and in this case they were the perpetrators,” he said. “But the victim also had a hand in his own death.” Giamo’s interest in Owen’s murder also stemmed from the interesting relationships between the story’s broad issues and diverse characters, he said. “[The book] is about homelessness, it is about social justice and it is about disability,” Giamo said. “It raises these broader issues and tries to do it in an engaging manner through creative nonfiction to give an account as truthful to the crime, to the setting and to the characters as can be.” In researching and writing his book, Giamo wanted to find out why someone who had professed his life to helping the homeless would reach his demise at their hands. Giamo said Owen was a fascinating yet polarizing character in his desire to reunite the homeless with their families through somewhat questionable tactics. “Owen wanted them [the homeless] to call their families and reconnect, but he would get in their faces and be aggressive,” he said. “If the homeless resisted, he would even go so far as to trash their encampments.” An encounter between Owen and four residents of a homeless encampment ultimately led to his death. Owen was speaking to the group in hopes of encouraging them to reconnect with their families, but the conversation eventually took on a negative tone, Giamo said. “When Owen would trash homeless encampments, he would photograph the before and after,” Giamo said. “On that particular day, he had those pictures in his satchel and they [the homeless perpetrators] found the pictures and burned them.” Owen was brutally beaten and lynched, and his body was found several weeks later, Giamo said. Four homeless individuals were eventually convicted of felony murder and kidnapping in the wake of Owen’s death. Members of the Topeka community characterized Owen for his difficult personality during their interviews with Giamo, he said, but the city’s residents also recognized Owen’s passion for and dedication to advocacy for the homeless. “He was extremely committed to the point that he gave his life, but that was always followed by a sense of fanaticism,” Giamo said. “Homeless Come Home” is available for purchase through the University of Notre Dame Press.last_img read more

Rain failed to dampen auctions across Brisbane on Saturday

first_img30 Yabba Street, AscotMrs McKenna said the 607sq m block and its location were what attracted buyers to the classic-style home.“It’s just a very sought after little pocket in there,” Mrs McKenna said. The gathering at the auction of 10 Patomar Street, Kedron. (AAP Image/Claudia Baxter)The modern two-storey house at 10 Patomar St sold to a couple for $1.025 million.About 50 onlookers watched as a bidding war unfold between two of the three registered bidders. 127 Laurel Ave, ChelmerThe opening bid was $4 million.“We had two registered bidders and probably a crowd of 80 to 100 people,” Mr Adcock said.“It was pouring rain at 11am so it certainly didn’t deter the crowds.” 10 Patomar Street, Kedron“A lot of that area is the standard 405sq m blocks so this has a little bit more yard,” Mr Jabs said.“Having side access and more yard than a smaller-lot home were the big things.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours ago10 Patomar Street, KedronHe said people looking to buy in the area were generally families and young couples.“A lot of people move into that area for the schools, and it’s pretty close to the city as well,” Mr Jabs said. 10 Patomar Street, KedronBUYERS braved the wet weather to attend auctions at some of the best homes Brisbane had to offer on Saturday.A new home in a tightly held Kedron cul-de-sac was one of the first to go under the hammer. 30 Yabba Street, AscotAbout 100 spectators watched on as the bidding started at $1.25 million and quickly climbed to $1.6 million. 127 Laurel Ave, ChelmerHe said the property’s “unbelievable” block size and its wide frontage to the river appealed to buyers most.“It’s probably one of the best riverfront blocks in Chelmer,” Mr Adcock said.He said the market for prestige homes was the best he had seen in a decade. 127 Laurel Ave, ChelmerIn Chelmer, a riverfront mansion with swimming pool and tennis court sold at auction for $5 million.Riverfront homes specialist at Adcock Prestige, Jason Adcock, said the 3122sq m property at 127 Laurel Ave sold to a local family that rented one street over. 30 Yabba Street, AscotIn Ascot, a 1930s built home sold for the first time in 30 years to a young couple.Ray White’s McKenna Pearse Properties sales consultant Janelle McKenna said there were 14 registered bidders for the two-bedroom property at 30 Yabba St. 127 Laurel Ave, Chelmer“This just shows that the prestige market in Brisbane has certainly come back to life,” Mr Adcock said. Winning bidders Matt Dawe and Krystle Cummings are congratulated by the agent after the auction of 10 Patomar Street, Kedron. (AAP Image/Claudia Baxter)The opening bid was $900,000 and sold to the couple following negotiations.Place Newmarket sales consultant Matthew Jabs said the home’s 587sq m block was what attracted buyers.last_img read more

WWE: Asuka, Otis win MITB briefcases after Mysterio is thrown off the roof

first_imgAsuka and Otis were victors as they claimed the respective women’s and men’s Money In The Bank briefcases in one of WWE’s most-bizarre ever matches. Asuka and Otis were the big winners at WWE’s Money in the Bank The women’s match had a stacked field with several former champions in Asuka, Nia Jax and Carmella. Loading… And fans were also left fearing for the health of the legendary Rey Mysterio and Aleister Black after Baron Corbin threw both stars off the roof of WWE’s headquarters. For the first time ever, the stakes were raised as both the men’s and women’s matches took place simultaneously at WWE headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut. The 12 total men and women began the match on the ground floor of Titan Towers and battled all the way to the roof where the coveted briefcases – containing a guaranteed title shot – were waiting hung up above a ring. And it was Otis who outlasted the other five male competitors after a bonkers match that threw up surprise cameos from WWE’s past, including Doink the Clown, Brother Love and John Laurinaitis. FULL RESULTS FROM MONEY IN THE BANKAJ Styles and Baron Corbin were fighting over the briefcase at the climax when Elias suddenly arrived to slam his guitar into Corbin. That left Styles in possession of the case, but only for a moment as he fumbled it and watched on agonisingly as it fell into the arms of Otis. That moment came just seconds after Mysterio and Black had both been tossed from the roof by Corbin. Otis now has the right to cash in his Money in the Bank contract for a world title match at any time after overcoming those four and Daniel Bryan.center_img Promoted ContentThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black HolesBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?11 Greatest Special Effects Movies Of All Time6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?The Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime10 Awesome TV Series That Got Cancelled Way Too Soon Read Also: Ajax manager confirms transfer agreement with Chelsea target Meanwhile former NXT Title holder Shayna Baszler joined Lacey Evans and Dana Brooke, who were searching for their first title on the main roster. But it was the Empress of Tomorrow who fended off Evans and Jax – and also Corbin as he simultaneously attempting to collect the men’s briefcase, to claim the win. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Bonobo conservation stymied by deforestation, human rights abuses

first_imgAnimals, Apes, Bonobos, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Environment, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Land Rights, Logging, Military, Mining, Old Growth Forests, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife The bonobo is a relative of the chimpanzee, and is found only in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) south of the Congo River. They are endangered, with habitat loss and the bushmeat trade their primary threats. The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the DRC’s largest nature reserve that is focused on bonobo conservation. However, deforestation rates have only increased in Sankuru since it was created in 2007. Meanwhile nearby Lomami National Park is experiencing almost no deforestation.Researchers attribute the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter. They claim that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.However, there may be a dark side to Lomami’s success. Sources claim that the military, which is tasked with protecting DRC’s national parks, have engaged in torture of people suspected of poaching. There are also reports that a community within Lomami was displaced without proper consultation or a suitable alternative location.Researchers say that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Bonobos, unlike closely related chimpanzees, choose love over war. But with each passing year, there is less room in this world for these amorous primates as the world’s largest bonobo refuge continues to lose thousands of hectares of rainforest to agricultural expansion.Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Modern chimpanzees and bonobos likely diverged from a common ancestor some 1.5 to 2 million years ago after their territory was separated by the formation of the Congo River, the world’s second largest river.Bonobos are only found on the southern side of the Congo River in the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Culturally, the bonobos are very different from the chimpanzees, choosing to live in matriarchal societies and engage in sexual rather than aggressive behavior to resolve conflict. Bonobo survey data has been difficult to obtain because of longstanding, violent conflict in the region and the remoteness of their forest habitat, but the IUCN reports the species population is endangered and in decline.The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the country’s largest nature reserve created for bonobo conservation. Sally Coxe, founder and president at Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI), said the idea for the reserve arose from a grassroots movement organized by local NGO Community Action for the Kasai Primates (ACOPRIK), which was formed in 2001 to address increasing hunting pressure on primates in the area.“With support from BCI, Sankuru conservation leader Heritier Mpo rescued an orphan bonobo named Esake that we successfully delivered to Lola ya Bonobo earlier this year,” Coxe said. “Bonobos are being hunted in parts of Sankuru; with renewed support, BCI and partners plan to strengthen bonobo monitoring and protection and conduct an awareness and anti-poaching campaign.” Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.ACOPRIK eventually reached out to the BCI for assistance in creating a community-controlled protected area. The DRC’s national authority overseeing protected areas, the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), performed its own assessment at Sankuru, and decided to prioritize the area for official protection in 2007. At this point, Coxe said an agreement was made with the local communities who agreed to no longer hunt bonobos, and to join together to create a community-managed nature reserve.“As its name indicates, the Sankuru Nature Reserve is not a national park; it is a nature reserve,” Coxe told Mongabay in an email. “It is controlled and managed locally… The people of Sankuru remain the stewards of their own land.”Coxe said biological surveys taken at the time of its creation revealed rich biodiversity, with “rare and endemic species including the okapi, bonobos, and at least ten other species of primates including the rare owl faced monkey and blue monkey, as well as Congo peafowl and forest elephants.”At the time of its creation, Sankuru was heralded as the largest protected area for great ape conservation in the world. However, the reserve has continued to lose thousands of hectares of forest every year. Satellite data from the University of Maryland (UMD) show Sankuru lost over 136,000 hectares of primary rainforest between 2001 and 2018. Further, deforestation appears have accelerated since the park was created in 2007, with over half of 2001-2018 tree cover loss – 70,800 hectares – happening between 2014 and 2018. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate the reserve is currently in the midst of another big year for deforestation.Satellite data show high levels of deforestation in Sankuru Nature Reserve this year while neighboring Lomami National Park has remained almost entirely unscathed. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite imagery shows much of the deforestation Sankuru has experienced over the past 20 years has been concentrated concentrated near towns, as well as along roads and paths that traverse the reserve. Coxe said Sankuru’s deforestation is primarily caused by expanding agriculture.“The deforestation that does exist at Sankuru stems largely from swidden (aka slash and burn) agriculture,” Coxe said. “People have inhabited this forest for centuries, and are part of its ecosystem. People are also the [primary] threat to bonobos and biodiversity.”In addition to habitat loss caused by deforestation, bonobos are threatened by the bushmeat trade. While traditional bushmeat hunting is one of the primary food and income sources for forest-dwelling people and communities in the DRC, the bushmeat trade has become increasingly commercialized with meat and animal parts sold in large cities, and even exported to other continents.The bushmeat trade has expanded partly alongside the logging industry as roads built to transport machinery, loggers and timber also give commercial hunters access to previously unreachable populations of wildlife, including chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas.The okapi (Okapia johnstoni) is a unique and endangered relative of the giraffe, and is only found in the DRC. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Terese Hart, who is the American director of the TL2 Project and the Lukuru Foundation, was instrumental in pushing the DRC government’s creation of the nearby Lomami National Park in 2016. In contrast to Sankuru, with which it shares a border, there has been very little deforestation happening within the Lomami National Park, according to satellite data from UMD.In 2009, the Wildlife Conservation Society conducted a survey in 30 percent of Sankuru. The survey only found nine old bonobo nests situated in one four-kilometer area near the eastern edge of the reserve, and found no evidence of elephants or other large mammals. Hart said her team found evidence of bonobos and okapis near the Lomami river on the eastern side of the reserve, but the elephants “were killed off years ago.”Community-based versus national park conservation modelsHart told Mongabay that she attributes the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter.“There are no villages in the Lomami National Park,” Hart said. “Because it is a national park there is a clear statement of what is and is not permitted within its borders. The Reserve has no such clarity.”Hart claimed that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.“The human landscape is particularly problematic as several ethnic groups are mixed together with conflicting land claims. One can please one group and almost certainly cause an uprising in another,” Hart said.Coxe argued that Sankuru’s community-based approach to conservation may have been ahead of its time, and its current lack of effectiveness is a consequence of inadequate funds. She contrasted this to the hardline conservation approach taken by Lomami National Park.Essylot Lubala of the Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestiere en RDC (OGF) participated in stakeholder meetings and “information exchange” with Sankuru communities, according to Sally Coxe. Here he is standing by an area of savannah within the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Image courtesy of Sally Coxe.“Protected areas that are community co-managed are relatively new in the DRC, and remain the poor and neglected cousins of African national parks,” Coxe said. “The Sankuru Nature Reserve is a multi-zoned, community-managed protected area. By contrast, Lomami is a national park, and people who had been living within its borders were expelled.”Human rights abuses cloud national parkIn the years before the Lomami National Park was created, a village called Obenge used to occupy territory which is now within the park’s borders. According to Hart, the “bushmeat” village had planned to move long before the park or any protected area was set up. She said the inhabitants agreed to leave after they were promised a new village in a different location by German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ) and World Bank, which has yet to materialize.“Although GIZ provided materials which are now being used by TL2 to build their houses, the World Bank has done nothing. These long delays are very regrettable but it should be noted that the first move of Obenge away from its original site had nothing to do with the park,” Hart said.Mongabay reached out to the World Bank to get their take, but received no response by the time this story was published.Bonobos are different than chimpanzees in many ways – they have smaller heads, darker faces, and longer hair that part down the middle. They’re also more likely to walk on two legs. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Maud Salber, who is Senior Project Coordinator for Rainforest Foundation UK, told Mongabay by email that her team surveyed 28 villages neighboring Lomami National Park to document local and indigenous communities’ perceptions of the park and conservation enforcement. She has a different account of what happened to Obenge.“Communities first left Obenge in 2013 to seek refuge from clashes between armed groups in the area. A number of people returned but they were then forced out by government forces in 2017 to make way for the park, without proper consultation,” Salber said.“They haven’t had a say in the relocation site, which they describe as wholly inadequate for their livelihoods, and the promised houses and infrastructure have not yet all been built. The process clearly did not adhere to international standards – no consultation, no compensation and no clear plan in place to compensate their loss of livelihoods”Salber said there was an effort to redraw the park’s boundaries to avoid villages, but even so, many communities lost access to significant parts of their customary lands traditionally used for hunting, fishing or gathering — putting a strain on already tenuous livelihoods. Further, she said communities complained about being harassed by park authorities who abused power for personal gain, with reported human rights abuses, and a case of sexual assault.Dr. Mwanza Ndunda, general director of the Congolese Center for Multidisciplinary Research traverses a bridge on a mission in Sankuru. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Additionally, Hart has written on her blog site that an innocent local was tortured because DRC military park guards mistook him to be an informant for a poaching warlord Thoms who has allegedly raped local women and murdered several park guards assigned to protect elephants. However, Hart said the person whom soldiers accused of collaborating with Thoms turned out to be a medicine salesman who happened to be in the wrong village at the wrong time.Hart said that the human rights abuses that are committed by park authorities are “regrettable,” but “the truth is very complicated… ‘best practices’ are difficult to assure in truly remote areas where there is no police force or government presence.”In 2017, UN Human Rights Chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein called on the DRC to halt the military from committing widespread human rights abuses. The DRC military primarily oversees the country’s exploitation of resources and protects business interests for the elites.Hart said her private NGOs had “no say” on the UN human rights chief’s call for ending DRC military abuse. She did not point to any clear steps that have been taken by park authorities to assure that human rights abuses are not committed in the future. Mongabay received no response to emails sent to DRC government offices.Grant land tenure to save the bonobos?The U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has included indigenous rights in its 2019 Special Report on Climate Change and Land, recognizing that the participation of Indigenous peoples is crucial to combating global climate change by preventing deforestation and preserving ecosystems.Salber believes there is a way that bonobos and other endangered wildlife can be conserved without causing human right abuses of indigenous forest-dwelling people. “The current trend towards more militarisation of conservation efforts certainly is not the way to go,” Salber said.“We have worked with a lot of communities around the park and it is clear that they are very committed to conserving resources for future generations. Conservation and anti-poaching efforts should engage with these communities.”Headquarters of Action Communautaire pour la Protection des Primates du Kasai (ACOPRIK), the local Sankuru NGO that spearheaded creation of the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Salber says that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Hart appeared to agree, saying that Sankuru should pursue a “series of community conservation projects around specific points of importance” in order to pull the brakes on deforestation and bonobo habitat loss.The 2013 book Of Bonobos and Men by Deni Béchard details a history of clashing approaches between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park, which both aim to protect the same particularly biodiverse area, home to large bonobos and okapi populations, near the Lomami River. In the book, Coxe reportedly said that conservationists dedicated to saving the great apes need to work together more, “to be more bonobo-like about conservation” because “there is a huge challenge saving the bonobos and very few people are available to work on it.” Banner image by DORIS META F via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).Data citation: Hansen, M.C., A. Krylov, A. Tyukavina, P.V. Potapov, S. Turubanova, B. Zutta, S. Ifo, B. Margono, F. Stolle, and R. Moore. 2016. Humid tropical forest disturbance alerts using Landsat data. Environmental Research Letters, 11 (3). Accessed through Global Forest Watch on October 23, 2019. www.globalforestwatch.orgEditor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.If you’re interested in bonobo conservation, watch more here:Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Update (October 30, 2019): After this article was published, Terese Hart (American director of the TL2 Project) and Jo Thompson (Lukuru Foundation President / Executive Director and Lukuru Project Director) reached out with more information. Hart refutes Rainforest Foundation UK’s account that the Obenge community was forced out of Lomami National Park, while Thompson lends her comments regarding the difficulties surrounding the training of Lomami park guards and the efficacy of the Community Concession conservation strategy.Hart: “Contrary to the information you have, the Obenge community chose its own relocation site. Among themselves there was no immediate consensus for a single site, but internally they came to an agreement to use the past site of Bangaliwa (abandoned village location) which was in the same groupement and maintained the advantage of relatively “easy” communication to the east (Mituku sector) where many have relatives. We had actually favored the option, promoted by another faction, for a more distant site (also abandoned village) that was closer to markets, but when there was general agreement for Bangaliwa we all tried to make the new Obenge2 possible. A couple years ago, before the creation of the park, we wrote a fairly detailed history of Obenge before and during its move. The community has not forgotten perceived “promises” made by World Bank and others. Our own FZS-TL2project has limited means to satisfy these, but construction with metal roofs is underway, thanks to materials donated by GIZ for that purpose. The advantage that Obenge has in its current location is that many of its citizens have regular work through the park. Some are Park Guards and others work part time or full time with our own project.”Thompson: “There is little evidence that community reserves conserve bonobos.  At this point there are few (if any) examples to indicate that Community Concessions will have better success than National Reserves at protecting bonobos and controlling natural resource exploitation.  In some areas human population pressure is high, in many areas resource exploitation is the only means to acquire cash despite the fact that populations are rising.  So how would individual communities deal with this? What needs to be written into each management plan?  What outside support needs to continue to be available to these communities?  We actually proposed in 2012 that a halo of community concession (communities with land tenure) be created around the Lomami National Park.  Our expectation is that they might be a first step towards improved ability for stewardship.  But it is only a small first step.The current Head Warden of the Lomami National Park is very much in favor of training guards in human rights and respectful law enforcement.  The warden before him was as well.  The problem (as mentioned by Sally Coxe) often comes down to financing.  The trainers must be brought in.  The guards must all cycle through.  Logistics, rations, evaluation all must be paid for.We are very much in favor of a more professional and humane park guard force, but that will be a small part in the huge reinforcement needed for a lawful and humane society at all levels.  The solution we hope for and most of us who live and work here, Congolese and non-Congolese alike, hope for, is a strengthened and expanded Judicial system, a re-trained and better-supported police force deployed throughout the territory and a smaller focused domestic role for a more restrained military.  That is a problem of finances and political will.  We don’t get discouraged — the stakes are too high — but there is not one simple solution and long involvement and commitment is needed on the ground to understand and support the human communities and the incredible wildlife diversity of this country.”center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Debate rages over intensive oil palm farming in Gabon

first_imgBanner image of tropical forest in Gabon by Axel Rouvin via Flickr (CC BY-SA-2.0)This article was first published in French on 9 October 2019. Article published by terna gyuse Nearly 88 percent of Gabon is covered in forests, but NGOs fear that the development of oil palm plantations threatens this viable resource.Local communities accuse SOTRADER, a public-private partnership between the government and the multinational Olam, of land grabbing.Its defenders say that the project respects the environment and community social commitments.In September, the government of Gabon signed an agreement allowing the sustainable management of its high carbon stock forests. Nearly 88 percent of Gabon is covered in forests. As the country seeks to diversify its economy, including developing agriculture and commercial plantations, can it continue to protect this important resource for local communities and biodiversity? Numerous NGOs are worried by the industrial cultivation of oil palm by the multinational Olam and have launched a campaign to raise the government’s awareness of the risks plantations pose to communities and the environment.In 2015, under the framework of a programme called  GRAINE (Gabonaise des réalisations agricoles et des initiatives des nationaux engagés – Gabonese Initiative for Achieving Agricultural Outcomes with an Engaged Citizenry), the Gabonese authorities formed a public-private partnership with the firm Olam Palm Gabon for the development of a tract spanning 58,500 hectares (144,600 acres). The company, known as Société gabonaise de transformation agricole et développement durable (SOTRADER – Gabonese Company for Agricultural Transformation and Sustainable Development) set up operations in Ndendé, in Ngounié province.People living in the area, in the villages of Ferra and Nanga, had initially welcomed the project in light of their precarious economic situation. But now they are accusing the company of running a counter-productive policy. These communities want to continue to enjoy their traditional rights to use the forest for farming and harvesting, and to ensure their food sovereignty.Added to this is anger among dissatisfied young people in these villages, who are critical of the insecurity of the jobs the company has created. “The average agricultural worker’s salary, which fluctuates between 100,00 and 150,000 CFA francs per month” — about $170 to $250 — “ is difficult to achieve, even working full time, while according to management’s reports, the firm itself is seeing turnover soar exponentially,” said Mouity Kombila Dimitri, an Olam employee in the department of Dola, speaking to Mongabay by telephone.Ladislas Ndembet, chair of the NGO Muyissi Environnement, who closely monitors the multinational’s conduct, sees enormous risks for nature, communities, plants and animals. “It is in everyone’s interests that the authorities, who have ceded several thousand hectares to Olam, review their land allocation policy,” he said. “This will avoid them being booed, as has just happened to Brice Laccruche Alihanga, the president’s chief-of-staff in Mouila; residents did not want to hear him praising Olam, who they accuse of depleting the soil and running a counter-productive policy.”On September 21, the International Day of Struggle Against Monoculture Tree Plantations, a coalition of residents of the affected areas and civil society groups from across West and Central Africa launched a petition against the expansion of plantations and land grabbing.The Ngounié River in Mouila, Gabon. Image by Vincent Vaquin via Flickr (CC BY-3.0)Defenders of the projectBut Olam also has its supporters in Gabonese civil society. Hervé Omva, chair of Initiatives Développement Recherches Conseils Africa (Development Initiatives Research Councils Africa, or IDRC Africa), an NGO working to support local groups for the protection of biodiversity and increasing the value of non-timber forest products, does not agree. When asked about the growth of Olam’s plantations, he sees Olam’s activities as among those carried out in the country with due care. “I am for the sustainable development of RSPO-certified oil palm plantations,” he said. “Since its arrival in this region, Olam is to be congratulated for its work in terms of respect for the environment, basic community social commitments and especially regarding the creation of sustainable jobs.”In a press release, the NGO Croissance Saine Environnement also rejected the allegations against the project: “It is important to remember that the concession which is implicated (SOTRADER Ndendé) in the aforesaid petition has been the subject of development which is 100% compliant with zero-deforestation principles; no forest in the concession has been touched. Furthermore, no development could have taken place without the consent and approval of the communities (through FPIC [free, prior and informed consent]), including those of Nanga and Ferra, communities which actively participated in the process of protection of their ancestral lands”.According to Croissance Saine Environnement, thousands of hectares have been put under conservation as a consequence of Olam’s project. The NGO points to the social contracts that have been agreed to with the communities in the south: “Beyond even those commitments, the Olam group has developed numerous additional programmes, particularly to guarantee improvements in the living conditions of inhabitants through the implementation of revenue-generating activities”.Yvon Martial Nzantsi Miyagou, coordinator of ROSCEVAC Ngounié and an active member of Croissance Saine Environnement, tells Mongabay that the intervention of his NGO is based on a regional study of several Olam sites carried out in partnership with the Institut National Supérieur d’Agronomie et de Biotechnologies (National Higher Institute of Agronomics and Biotechnology).Marc Ona Essangui, a long-time environmental defender and the executive secretary for the NGO Brainforest who won the Goldman Prize in 2009 in recognition of his work against deforestation, does not understand these interventions. “Muyissi Environnement is an independent NGO which is criticizing Olam’s activities in the Ngounié; without even waiting for the company’s reaction, it’s Croissance Saine Environnement which is all over the newspapers,” he told Mongabay. Brainforest is a signatory of the petition alongside Muyissi Environnement.Ndembet, while not entirely opposed to Olam’s activities which he says can, to a limited extent, create wealth, settle populations, and improve their well-being, is opposed to the government’s ambition to make Gabon the leading African producer of palm oil in the very near future. “My fear stems from the fact that Olam cannot meet its commitments to the villages for whom land is fundamental. The multinational has signed social contracts which have no force without legal value, which rather resemble a fool’s bargain aimed at enriching Olam to the detriment of rural communities,” he said.Since 2000, the government of Gabon has created 13 national parks, one of which is classed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In September, Gabon signed an agreement aimed at sustainable management of its high carbon stock forests. The agreement will reward the country with payments amounting up to $150 million, based on results for the protection of high conservation value areas and maintaining its vast forest cover.Gabon is home to nearly 60 percent of the forest elephants remaining in Africa. Image by Ngangorica via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-4.0) Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Conservation, Defaunation, Environment, Forests, Land Grabbing, Palm Oil, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

ARSENAL PLAYERS JOIN FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN FOR STRICKEN SOCCER STAR MARK FARREN

first_imgArsenal stars Jack Wilshere and Aaron Ramsey have joined the fundraising initiative for Mark Farren.Arsenal FC stars Aaron Ramsey and Jack Wilshere have joined the fundraising drive for stricken former LOI star Mark Farren.Earlier this week Mark Farren’s family released a statement in which they revealed the former Derry City strikers latest operation to remove a brain tumour had been unsuccessful.They now desperately want him to undergo revolutionary treatment in Germany that they hope will save his life but the cost is a staggering €30,000. However, the response from the footballing fraternity and beyond has been incredible and they’ve almost reached their initial target.Signed Arsenal jerseys belonging to Jack Wilshere and Aaron Ramsey will be auctioned on E-Bay tomorrow with all proceeds going towards his treatment fund.The Arsenal stars are just the latest in a number of high-profile players who have made donations.Everton star Seamus Coleman and Wigan Atletic winger James McClean have also made significant donations to the treatment fund. The family are encouraging anyone who can donate to continue to do so even if they reach there target, because they will have to stay in Germany for a significant amount of time during Mark’s treatment and the cost of living there will be no doubt be very expensive.The family have also thanked EVERYONE who has made a donation and says they’ve been overwhelmed by the response so far. ARSENAL PLAYERS JOIN FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN FOR STRICKEN SOCCER STAR MARK FARREN was last modified: May 5th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arsenal FCBrain tumourMark FarrennewsSportTreatment Fundlast_img read more

Brian Nsubuga to take charge of Masaza Cup final

first_img Tags: Brian Miiro NsubugaBudduBulemeziBusiroDenis MwemeziKyadondoMasaza Cup FinalRonald Muwenda MutebiSsese Nsubuga (right) will be the center referee for the final.Masaza Cup Final 2019Bulemezi vs BusiroMandela National Stadium, NambooleSaturday, 26-10-2019 @3pmNAMBOOLE – The Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA) has named Brian Mirro Nsubuga as the man to handle the Masaza Cup final on Saturday afternoon.The game that will be played on Saturday afternoon sees Buriro take on Bulemezi at Mandela National Stadium.Miiro-a senior referee and former FIFA referee-will be the in the center to ensure the game flows smoothly.He will be assisted by Mark Ssonko as the first assistant and Catherine Nagadya as second assistant.The fourth official is expected to be Ali Sabila with the match assessor being George Katumba.For the third-place playoff match, Rashid Kimera will be the center referee.Bulemezi is attempting to win a second Masaza Cup following their maiden triumph in 2012. The Peter Mugerwa coached side was also losing finalists in 2011.For Busiro, they are in their first-ever final and will be hoping to become the 9th different side to win the crown.Ssese’s Denis Mwemezi leads the scoring charts with 7 goals going into the final.The third-place playoff match will be between Buddu and Kyadondo and will start at 11am.The Kabaka of Buganda, His Majesty Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II will present the winners with the trophy.The winner between Busiro and Bulemezi will pocket Shs 12M, get gold medals and a trophy. The runners up will get silver medals and Shs 9M.For the third-place position, the winner walks home 7M and the loser will settle for Shs 5M.Masaza Cup past Winners2018 – Ssingo2017 – Gomba2016 – Buddu2015 – Ssingo2014 – Gomba2013 – Mawokota2012 – Bulemezi2011 – Buluri2010 – Not Held2009 – Gomba2008 – Kyadondo2007 – Mawokota2006 – Kooki2005 – Mawokota2004 – GombaComments last_img read more

Cheers! Donegal bar scoops Irish Pub Award

first_imgCelebrations are underway for The Rusty Mackerel pub after their victory in the Irish Pub of the Year Awards.The South Donegal pub scooped the Best Newcomer award in the 2019 awards, which are hosted by Vintners Federation of Ireland (VFI) and The Licenced Vintners Association (LVA).The Rusty Mackerel in Teelin is a popular stop for locals and tourists alike who enjoy the traditional Irish pub atmosphere near Sliabh Liag. The Rusty Mackerel – TeelinThis year over 1,700 applications were made to the Irish Pub Awards. Paris Texas in Kilkenny was named National Pub of the Year.Speaking at the Irish Pub Awards: Padraic McGann, VFI President said: “All winners faced very stiff competition to reach the final.  Irish pubs are the hub of any community – a warm destination to meet friends where they can enjoy good food and drink, music and entertainment and where tourists can mingle with locals to experience an Irish atmosphere at its best.  These awards reflect the high quality of our pubs across Ireland, their ongoing investment in raising standards and their importance as community centres,” he said.   Cheers! Donegal bar scoops Irish Pub Award was last modified: November 25th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Put Foot is putting African children on the road to success with new shoes

first_imgA South African charity is taking on the challenge of making sure underprivileged children across the continent have at least one good pair of shoes.The Put Foot Foundation, founded by former Springbok rugby player Bob Skinstad, makes sure rural underprivileged children across South Africa and the rest of Africa receive a good quality pair of shoes. (Image: Put Foot Foundation)CD AndersonThe Put Foot Foundation, a proudly South African public beneficiary organisation (PBO) and non-profit charity, was founded by former Springbok rugby player Bob Skinstad. It is dedicated to giving hope, pride and dignity to underprivileged rural children through owning their own pair of new, quality school shoes.The organisation believes that shoes are symbolic of pride and give confidence to young people so that they can walk to school in comfort and confidence.Volunteers on the road during the 2017 Put Foot Rally that donates pairs of shoes to children across Southern Africa. (Image: Put Foot Foundation)In its mission statement, the organisation explains that “shoes are also a vital protection barrier between our children’s tiny soles and Africa’s rough and unforgiving terrain”.Together with his co-founders, social entrepreneur Daryn Hillhouse and digital communications expert Mike Sharman, Skinstad says the organisation is focused on addressing the needs of rural areas in South Africa and across the rest of Africa that have been overlooked by other charities and NGOs.“We believe that there is no greater experience than providing our donors with the opportunity to experience the impact that their donations have made possible. That is why we invite and strongly encourage our donors to take part in the life-changing experience of gifting a brand-new pair of school shoes to a young, underprivileged child,” Skinstad writes on the Put Foot website.During its annual Put Foot Rally across Southern Africa, volunteers deliver thousands of shoes to rural school children. In June 2017, the Rally visited communities in South Africa, Namibia and Zambia, delivering over 2,000 pairs of shoes; 500 children in Otjiwarongo, Namibia each received a pair of unique Shoes That Grow footwear.(Image: The Shoe That Grows website)Shoes That Grow, invented by American Kenton Lee, is a sandal-type shoe that can be adjusted for size and comfort, and grow with the children’s feet, lasting up to five years. Lee works with a number of international charities to distribute shoe donations to Ecuador, Haiti and countries across Africa.Meanwhile, Put Foot is also edging closer to its 2017 goal of raising R1-million, which will mean more rallies around Africa and more shoes for the continent’s children.Put Foot volunteer Brent Lindeque took part in a recent Put Foot rally in Zambia: “I met Audrey, an 8-year-old who had never owned a new pair of shoes. Every single piece of clothing she had ever worn was a hand-me-down or second-hand donation that had been given to her … [we] got to give Audrey her first pair of new shoes ever. Fighting back the tears she smiled and told me that one day she would make enough money to give underprivileged kids the things that she hasn’t been able to afford in her life.”CliffCentral radio personality Lindeque runs the feel-good news website, Good Things Guy.“Those who can afford it,” Lindque writes on his website, “take shoes for granted … but these kids don’t have that choice and to see the joy they get from a simple act of kindness is too good not to share.”In addition to their shoe donations, Put Foot is involved in wildlife conservation, particularly rhino protection. The group has donated more than R500,000 for the protection of Africa’s most endangered animals, including rhinos, the Hartmann’s mountain zebra and the African wild cat.Put Foot also helps other Section 18A organisations with similar objectives, including Habitat for Humanity and corporate fundraising.But the main focus is on getting those shoes on feet, and the organisation is continually seeking out donations and volunteers to help sustain its success. No contribution is too small, says Put Foot, which welcomes individual and organisation donations.For more information on the work of Put Foot and to find out how you can help, visit the official Put Foot website and join the conversation on its social media pages on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, where you can also watch video of the Put Foot volunteers in action. Source: Put Foot Foundation, Good Things GuyWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

The Very Real Stunts of James Bond

first_imgThese behind-the-scenes clips of explosive James Bond stunt action will leave you both shaken and stirred.Top image from United ArtistsConsidering Hollywood’s ability to basically create anything and everything with digital effects, it’s refreshing that the team behind the Bond franchise knows that sometimes you just have to strap a guy to the bottom of a helicopter and take to the skies. Sometimes the only way to get the shot is to hire a driver and have him demolish $34,000,000 worth of Aston Martins and Land Rovers.With the current Bond era maintaining a darkly realistic Nolan-esque tone, it can be argued that Daniel Craig’s turns as the titular super-spy are the most stunt-packed entries in the series yet. Let’s take a closer look at what goes into risking life and limb for the public’s hard-earned entertainment dollars.Aspiring filmmakers: you should totally try this at home. Just kidding. But if you do, share the footage with us!Spectre Stunt Driver InterviewSpeaking of the above-mentioned $34,000,000 in car carnage, Spectre stunt driver Mark Higgins is responsible for a lot of it. From a recent interview with Evo:We’ve been on this now for three months. We did rehearsals back in December and the main Rome car chase started three weeks ago. This week we’ve had a wall ride, we’ve been jumping down steps, drifting around the streets and gone through the Vatican at over 100mph, which is pretty awesome. I don’t think anybody has ever done that before and I don’t think it’ll ever be done again.Higgins also did the driving for Skyfall, recruited by fellow auto-ace Ben Collins, aka The Stig from BBC’s Top Gear. There’s more to stunt driving than simply buckling up and flooring it:Stunt driving is a team job, and you’re only as good as the people and professionals around you. The driving is the natural part for me, but the camera sees different parts that change the whole dynamics of the driving. There are always some dangers, but the team works to reduce these with practice and professional stunt co-ordinators.In other danger-related Bond news, we found this pretty amusing. Zeiss Lenses recently shared the following photo through social media:Developed jointly with ARRI, Master Anamorphic lenses feature in the production of a range of major films, including the newly launched James Bond 007 Spectre. Whilst attached to a camera car travelling over 100mph during filming, this lens flew off, bouncing for over 1 mile down the road. Despite this, none of the lenses were damaged or displaced, and only minor damage was caused to the outer casing. That’s what we call #ZEISS quality.The Action of SpectreThis making-of hype clip featuring Director Sam Mendes, Special Effects Supervisor Chris Corbould, and First Assistant Director Michael Lerman doesn’t simply highlight the stunts of Spectre. This video rips its shirt off, spikes the football, and drops the mic. Just look at the wingless airplane erupting out of the second story of a house at 1:08.Skyfall’s Catacomb ChaosHere’s some great behind-the-scenes video from Skyfall that shows what went into the famous “train crashing through the ceiling of the catacombs” scene. Hint: it involves crashing an actual train through the roof of some catacombs. The video ends with the finished clip from the movie. It’s a massive operation that surely took months of planning by dozens of professionals. All for just a few moments of action on film. Impressive.Casino Royale: Parkour with Sebastian FoucanHands down one of the most thrilling, stomach-in-knots sequences in recent history, the parkour chase in Casino Royale is an amazing display of athleticism and professional stunt prowess. Featuring pioneering freerunner Sebastian Foucan, this behind-the-scenes look shows you how they pulled it all off.IGN’s Top 007 James Bond StuntsAnd, just for kicks, let’s close with a look at IGN’s choice of the top stunts from the Bond series.What are your favorite action moments from the James Bond franchise? Share them in the comments below!last_img read more