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Inside the ‘priceless’ interaction between Savannah police, a 21-year-old mom and her twins

first_imgiStock(SAVANNAH, Ga.) — Officers from Savannah, Georgia, pulled over a young mom for driving without a license plate — but ended up engaging with her and her kids in a way that gave her “a completely different outlook on police,” the department said.When officers on Friday night stopped a car that didn’t have a license plate, they also found 1-year-old twins who weren’t in proper car seats, according to the Savannah Police Department.“The mother was only 21 years old and had her original vehicle stolen recently, hence the no license plate,” the department said in a Facebook post. “She had also just started a new job.”The officers decided to buy her new car seats, and while Cpl. Steve Bland went to the store, Officers Austin Neumann and William Daniels kept the children entertained, police said.The kids were crying and scared, so “I kind of leaned down next to a little boy. He just turned right to me and wanted to be picked up,” said Neumann, who’s seen in this photo first posted to Facebook by his wife.“And that was it — we were just best friends after that,” Neumann said. “He didn’t want to be let down.”“The boys just really, really took a liking to the officers, so much so that when the interaction was over … the boys just did not want to let go,” Savannah police spokeswoman Bianca Johnson told ABC News.Neumann said it’s important for the public to know that police aren’t looking to “harass” or arrest drivers — officers are there to help keep communities safe.“She was very thankful,” he said of the young mom.“They go above and beyond for kids all the time,” Officer Neumann’s wife, Kelsey Neumann, said of her husband and his colleagues. “I didn’t expect anything less from them.”“You could tell that that not only touched the hearts of the officers and the boys, but the mother,” Johnson said. “With the way some attitudes are toward police, those interactions are really priceless.”After the officers installed the car seats, “the mother drove away with a completely different outlook on police,” the department said on Facebook.And Kelsey Neumann called her husband’s actions good practice — the Neumanns’ first child, a daughter, is due in January.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Conor McGregor to return to UFC? Irish star drops hint on Diaz rematch anniversary post

first_img First Published: 21st August, 2020 16:13 IST WATCH US LIVE 1 month ago Mike Tyson predicts police involvement for potential showdown against Conor McGregor After announcing his retirement back in June, Conor McGregor has once again teased his UFC return. The Irishman recently posted a photo of himself on Instagram, which was taken moments before he went inside the octagon to fight Nate Diaz at UFC 202. Conor McGregor went on to defeat Nate Diaz via majority decision after five thrilling rounds (48–47, 47–47, 48–47). “4 years ago today! Backstage waiting to go out for one of the biggest bouts of my fighting life! McGregor/Diaz II Wow! Maybe there is more,” read the caption of the anniversary post Conor McGregor uploaded this week. Also Read l Conor McGregor UFC return: McGregor celebrates engagement to Dee DevlinConor McGregor UFC return: Conor McGregor’s retirement storyA few months after making his UFC return and defeating Donald Cerrone at UFC 246 by TKO in the first round, Conor McGregor talked to MMA journalist Ariel Helwani on ESPN and announced his retirement. UFC fans didn’t entirely believe McGregor’s claims as this was his third retirement announcement and his recent post goes some way to prove that MMA fans were right when they claimed that McGregor will return soon. Conor McGregor had previously announced his retirement in 2016 and 2019 before twice returning to the octagon.Also Read l Conor McGregor UFC return: Silva says he agreed to fight McGregor but UFC blocked the boutConor McGregor UFC return: Conor McGregor vs Nate Diaz 3 on the cards?Conor McGregor and Nate Diaz have faced each other twice in the UFC Octagon. Nate Diaz won the first fight at UFC 196 via a rear-naked choke in the second round, while Conor McGregor won the second bout. Since then, fans have been asking UFC chief Dana White to book Conor McGregor vs Nate Diaz 3, which could end the ongoing debate between fans regarding who trumps whom.Also Read l Conor McGregor UFC return: Tyson predicts police involvement for potential showdown vs McGregorConor McGregor UFC return: Could Conor McGregor vs Nate Diaz 3 go down in 2020?Even if Conor McGregor decides to make his UFC return this year, fans won’t be seeing the former UFC double champion fight anyone in 2020. While talking to Barstool Sports, Dana White made it clear that McGregor will not fight this year. “I’m not saying he won’t fight in 2021, but I’m telling you we don’t have a fight planned for him in 2021, but I guarantee he will not fight in 2020,” said White.Also Read l Conor McGregor UFC return: White rules out McGregor return to UFC in 2020Image credits: AP Written By LIVE TV SUBSCRIBE TO US WE RECOMMEND Last Updated: 21st August, 2020 16:14 IST Conor McGregor To Return To UFC? Irish Star Drops Hint On Diaz Rematch Anniversary Post Conor McGregor recently posted a photo of himself on Instagram, which was taken moments before he went inside the octagon to fight Nate Diaz at UFC 202. FOLLOW US 1 month ago Dana White rules out Conor McGregor return to UFC in 2020 despite Irishman’s cryptic tweet 1 month ago Conor McGregor takes a jibe at Khabib Nurmagomedov’s tweet, ridicules his style Adil Khan 2 weeks ago Anderson Silva says he agreed super-fight against Conor McGregor but UFC blocked the bout COMMENT 1 month ago UFC’s Khamzat Chimaev flew to Conor McGregor’s native in 2018 to bash up Irishmanlast_img read more

Forest loss threatens territorial gibbons in southern Borneo

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fires, Forest Fires, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Logging, Mammals, Primates, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Bornean southern gibbons have the largest territories of any species in their genus, a new study has found.These large home ranges, combined with the species’ intense territoriality, puts it at particular risk of habitat loss as a result of deforestation and fire.The findings of this research demonstrate that this endangered species needs large areas of unbroken forest. Gibbons living in southern Borneo have the largest territories of any of their close relatives, according to a new study. From a conservation perspective, those large ranges are a liability, putting them at higher risk when their habitat is wiped out by fire or deforestation.The research, published July 31 in the journal PLOS ONE, draws on nearly nine years of data on four groups of Bornean southern gibbons (Hylobates albibarbis) living in the peatlands of the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan. Combining the GPS locations of the groups with exhaustive observations of the apes’ behaviors, the team found that this species defends a “core range” of 21 to 52 hectares (52 to 128 acres) where they sleep and communicate with each other and other groups through hooting “duets” or “codas.”A Borneo southern gibbon at a safari park in the Netherlands. The species is also known as the white-bearded gibbon. Image by Tim Strater via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0).They also ply more expansive “home ranges” of almost 150 hectares (371 acres) in search of food. Unlike the core areas, which rarely overlap with those of other groups, gibbons are more apt to share parts of their home ranges.Still, gibbons tend to stick to the ranges they’ve secured in the forest for years at a time, Susan Cheyne, a biologist with the Borneo Nature Foundation and the paper’s lead author, said in a statement. That stalwart commitment to such large territories could be a recipe for conflict with other gibbon groups if they lose parts of their forest range and are forced into a rival group’s territory. During the study, one of the groups had to shift its range to the west when fires swept through parts of Borneo in 2015.The concern is that forest loss as a result of fire, at the hands of loggers or to make way for agriculture could push this IUCN-listed endangered species into splinters of forest too small to support it.A young gibbon in Central Kalimantan. Image by Wibowo Djatmiko via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).“Gibbons need large areas to survive and linking forests,” the authors write, “and reducing fragmentation is the key to their conservation.”Cheyne and her colleagues argue that insights into the behavior of gibbons can help conservationists and land managers come up with strategies to help these animals survive.“Understanding how Gibbons use the forest is critical to their conservation,” Cheyne said in the statement. “These data can feed into creating protected areas of suitable size and habitat quality to maintain viable populations of the singing, swinging small apes.”A white-bearded gibbon, pictured here in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Image by Wibowo Djatmiko via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Banner image of a young male gibbon courtesy of the Borneo Nature Foundation. Citation:Cheyne, S. M., Capilla, B. R., K., A., Supiansyah, Adul, Cahyaningrum, E., & Smith, D. E. (2019). Home range variation and site fidelity of Bornean southern gibbons [Hylobates albibarbis] from 2010-2018. PLOS ONE, 14(7), e0217784. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0217784Nijman, V., Richardson, M. & Geissmann, T. (2008). Hylobates albibarbis (errata version published in 2018). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T39879A128972094. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T39879A10279127.en. Downloaded on 29 July 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Misinformation and blame spread concerning sources of Amazon fires

first_imgWith the global spotlight on Brazil’s Amazon fires, those in and out of government are playing a blame game, pointing fingers and often using unsubstantiated claims to target those they say set the blazes.Pres. Jair Bolsonaro, without evidence, has blamed NGOs disgruntled at losing international Amazon funding. He also accused state governors for not fighting the fires. One ruralist even blamed ICMBio (Brazil’s national park service) for setting the blazes, though she has since been charged with setting fires in a protected area.Conservationists put the blame squarely on Bolsonaro and his deregulation and defunding of government institutions, including IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental enforcement agency, which used to regularly fight fires and arrest perpetrators.IBAMA claims that, though warned days in advance of “A Day of Fire” in Pará state, it received no law enforcement backup from federal or state authorities. This allowed ruralists (radical agricultural advocates) in Altamira and Novo Progresso to set hundreds of fires on August 10-11, with little fear of fines or prosecution. Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles (left), with President Jair Bolsonaro (right). Image by Marcos Corrêa/PR.The extent to which President Jair Bolsonaro will change his much criticized environmental policies after this year’s Amazon fires became global news is still unknown. But his accusation, unbacked by evidence, last Wednesday accusing environmental NGOs of lighting the blazes seems to align with the unproven accusations of at least one cattle rancher Nair Brizola, from Cachoeira da Seca district, in Altamira, Pará state, published this Sunday by the magazine Globo Rural. Such wild claims are indicative of the rumors and innuendo now sweeping the country regarding the causes of the fires.The rancher claims that officials from ICMBio (Brazil’s national park service) set fire to the forest in her region. “There was a black motorbike setting everything on fire here. And they were on my property with that motorbike strapped over their truck,” the Globo Rural account said.She went on: “The trucks, they are doing all this terror with ICMbio. President Bolsonaro is right when he says that those NGOs are setting fire…. The fire set by the road is not from farmers.” Brizola claimed the trucks in question were imprinted with the ICMBio logo.Brizola is a ruralist (a radical agribusiness advocate), and a former candidate for councilor in Guarantã do Norte municipality, in Mato Grosso state. According to the news website O Eco, Brizola was fined in mid-August for “destroying 70.9 hectares [175 acres] of forest in the Amazon biome with the use of fire within the Serra do Cachimbo Biological Reserve, one of the most deforested conservation units in Pará.” She received a fine of R$ 1 million (US$ 240,000) for acts of deforestation, illegal burning and seizure of protected land.To fully understand the claims against ICMBio, one needs some back story. Last April, ICMBio president Adalberto Eberhard resigned and three directors also left their posts. A fourth director learned of his dismissal by Environment Minister Ricardo Salles through social media. Eberhard was against Bolsonaro’s planned merger of ICMBio with IBAMA, Brazil’s federal environmental agency, which has yet to take place.Salles since then has replaced all of the ICMbio directors with military police officers who worked with him during his time as São Paulo state secretary of the environment (2016-2017) and as private secretary of then São Paulo governor Geraldo Alckmin. So, one could possibly infer, if ICMbio agents were truly burning forest, they were either doing so on Bolsonaro’s new directors’ orders, or they were renegade officials setting fires.The photo used by the Folho do Progresso newspaper to report on the “Day of Fire,” an August 10 event that the ruralist supported newspaper itself promoted five days before the fires were intentionally set. Image by Folha do Progresso.It’s the fault of others!A few days earlier, Bolsonaro raised unfounded suspicions against NGOs as possible arsonists in the Amazon burning: “There may be criminal actions by those ‘ongeiros‘ in order to draw attention against me, against the government of Brazil…. In my view, there is interest from those NGOs [to promote burnings], which represent interests from outside Brazil.” Bolsonaro claims the NGOs set the blazes after being angered over the freezing of international Amazon funds due to the government’s anti-environmental policies.The President also blamed Amazon state governments: “There are governors, whom I don’t want to name, that are tolerant with what is going on and put the fault on the federal government. There are states in the northern region whose governors aren’t doing a thing to help fight the fires, and are enjoying [what is happening].”He offered no evidence for his claim.Amid Bolsonaro’s and ruralists’ innuendos, others are faulting the failure of both federal and state agencies. For example, it has been reported that the independent litigators of the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) warned IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, three days ahead of the so-called “Day of Fire” in Pará state, as a large group of farmers planned a massive series of burnings in the municipalities of Altamira and Novo Progresso.The “Day of Fire” had been no secret. Plans for the event were published in the local newspaper Folha do Progresso, controlled by ruralists, on August 5. The MPF in turn requested IBAMA prepare a contingency plan to curb the plot, and arrest and fine wrongdoers. But IBAMA didn’t act and hundreds of blazes were lit, some legal, others illegal, on the weekend of August 10.Two days after this criminal action, IBAMA reported the reason for its failure: it had requested law enforcement support from the National Public Security Force, controlled by Sergio Moro — he was appointed justice minister by Bolsonaro, possibly, say critics, as a reward for convicting and keeping former president Lula in jail and out of the 2018 election. Lula had been favored in the polls to win if freed and allowed to run. IBAMA also reports asking the Pará state military police for assistance, without success.Prosecutor Paulo de Tarso Moreira Oliveira, who is leading the investigation into the “Day of Fire,” stated that the ability to enforce environmental infractions has been weakened by a lack of support from Pará state. “IBAMA’s base in Novo Progresso has been withdrawn, [and its] operations scheduled for the second half of this year, corresponding to the dry period, were entirely canceled.” IBAMA typically sets up a base in Pará every year during the fire season, but with threats of violence high against the agency, it chose not to establish a post in 2019 without federal or state police protection.Joenia Wapichana, the first elected indigenous federal House deputy woman in the country, said that “land invasions and the increasing activity of miners and loggers [and other illegal groups] are the real cause of the Amazon fires, fueled by backwardness, omission, and the irresponsibility of the federal government’s environmental policies for the region.”The Amazon rainforest burns within the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.In related news, the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) has given ten days, starting from August 23, for both the Ministries of Environment and of Science and Technology to prove that rising 2019 deforestation data provided by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) is unreliable, as alleged by the Bolsonaro government.The MPF gave the same deadline to the Ministries of Agriculture and of Mines and Energy, ordering them to provide information on what they are doing to comply with the National Climate Change Policy Act of 2009, as well as with the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015, ratified by the federal executive branch in 2017. Bolsonaro is a climate change denier who threatened to pull out of the Paris Agreement during his election campaign, a pledge from which he later backpedaled. There are strong signs the administration is doing little to keep its Paris carbon reduction pledge.Rage over the Amazon fires, and strongly worded accusations over their source are blooming from all sides of the political spectrum in Brazil: Elio Gaspari, a columnist from Folha de S.Paulo newspaper, suggested: “Just put in prison half a dozen of the agro-troglodytes [elite agribusiness ruralists] that took advantage of the change of government to set fire to the forest. Those who know the Amazon are aware that there is no point in arresting pawns. Agro-troglodytes are in beautiful townhouses and spend big holidays in Miami.”Banner image caption: Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Climate Change, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

Disaster strikes in Bolivia as fires lay waste to unique forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story is a translated and adapted version of a story first published by Mongabay Latam on Aug. 22, 2019.Banner image: Fire rages outside the community of Taperas. Image courtesy of Germain Caballer.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Soy, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Fires are raging in Bolivia, hitting particularly hard the Chiquitano dry forests of the country’s southern Santa Cruz region.Officials say the fires are largely the result of intentional burning to convert forest to farmland. Sources say this practice has recently intensified after Bolivian president Evo Morales signed a decree in July expanding land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz.Satellite data indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, with data from NASA showing August fire activity in Santa Cruz was around three times higher than in years past.Human communities are suffering due to the fires, with reports of smoke-caused illnesses and drinking water shortages. Meanwhile, biologists are worried about the plants and animals of the Chiquitano dry forests, many of which are unique, isolated and found nowhere else in the world. This story is a journalistic collaboration between Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and the Bolivian newspaper Página Siete“Fire is a monster and is threatening us. Everything is ashes and fear,” says Iván Quezada, the mayor of Roboré, a town in eastern Bolivia. Last week, fires consumed more than 450,000 hectares (1.11 million acres) of forest; if added to the amount of forest destroyed since the fires in Bolivia began this year, that figure would border on a million hectares (2.5 million acres), according to official sources.Every year at this time, the chaqueos, burning events to prepare the land for planting crops or raising cattle, are carried out in the Chiquitania region of eastern Bolivia, often generating fires that burn out of control. However, this year is worse. Boosted by a controversial governmental decree that promotes the expansion of the agricultural frontier and allows “controlled burning” in forests, the chaqueos have triggered a crisis for the area’s unique dry forests and savannas.Firefighters combat the fire that spread due to high winds throughout the small region of Santa Cruz. Image courtesy of APG.On July 9, President Evo Morales approved the amendment of Supreme Decree 26075 to expand land demarcated for livestock production and the agribusiness sector to include Permanent Forest Production Lands in the regions of Beni and Santa Cruz. The decree authorizes the clearing of forest for agricultural activities in private- and community-held areas under a system of sustainable management. According to current regulations, this system allows controlled burning.“We have the duty and mission to boost Bolivia’s economic growth, not only based on non-renewable natural resources but also based on agriculture,” Morales said. He added via Twitter that the government is planning on expanding agricultural production and infrastructure to boost beef exports to China.Evo Morales, president of Bolivia. Image by Valter Campanato/Agência Brasil via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0 BR).A crisis in Santa CruzBolivia’s Santa Cruz region is rich in forest cover. But the lack of rain in the last three months has turned the dry forest into combustible fuel, with eight nearby communities directly affected by fires so far.One of these is the town of Roboré, where the air is thick with smoke. The situation is more somber in surrounding communities, however. Families depend on water transported from the mountains via hoses. But these hoses these have been burned, cutting off community access to drinking water. Moreover, residents report that any water that reaches them is full of ashes, which causes digestive and respiratory problems, infections and conjunctivitis. Community activities, including school, have been suspended. Local authorities have requested the declaration of a state of emergency, but the government says it is not necessary.A fire burns in dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo, a volunteer firefighter.Firefighters sent by the Santa Cruz police department to battle the blazes face difficulties on the ground. For one, there are no trails to access the fire areas. Also, because water delivery systems can’t cross roads in the region, firefighters are forced to carry water in backpacks. Ultimately, this means firefighting is slower than the rate at which the fires are spreading; as fires are being put out on one side of the road, more are ignited on the other.Firefighters strategize outside San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero, mayor of San José de Chiquitos.Along with the regulation changes and seasonal burning practices, windy conditions are contributing to the inferno, helping spread the fires over an ever-greater area. With strong winds forecast in the near future, many are worried things are just going to get worse.Skyrocketing deforestationBolivia is no stranger to fire and deforestation. According to numbers from the University of Maryland (UMD), which has been collating satellite data on the world’s forests since the beginning of the century, the country lost 7.5 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2018. The record-holding year during this period was 2016, when around 471,000 hectares (1.16 million acres) of tree cover were lost.But preliminary data for 2019 indicate this year could dramatically unseat 2016. According to the Forest and Land Audit and Social Control Authority (ABT), fires have consumed more than 953,000 hectares (2.35 million acres) of Bolivian forest so far. If these data hold true, this means that deforestation in 2019 will be more than double that of 2016 — and more than three times the 300,000 hectares (741,000 acres) lost in 2018.The lion’s share of Bolivia’s deforestation is happening in the Santa Cruz region, which comprises vast tracts of both the rainforest of the Amazon and the dry forests of the Gran Chaco. Satellite data show that Santa Cruz lost a full 10 percent of its tree cover in less than two decades. Here, too, preliminary numbers from UMD indicate 2019 may be a banner year for forest loss, with tree cover loss alerts spiking in late August to levels more than double the average of previous years. Most of these alerts are occurring in areas with high fire activity, according to data from NASA that show Santa Cruz fire activity in August was around three times higher than in years past.“If we take 2012 as the base year, when 128,043 hectares [316,401 acres] were deforested [in Santa Cruz], this year’s deforestation would be more than seven times greater; and if we take only the deforestation of Chiquitania, it would be three times greater,” said Pablo Solón, former Bolivian ambassador to the U.N.Satellite data show fire activity is still heavy around Roboré, but is intensifying in the northern and western portions of the Santa Cruz region. Source: NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Fire burns through forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Santa Cruz’s forests are being carved away to free up more land for soy plantations, cattle ranches, illicit coca-growing operations, and biofuel crops, as well as for the expansion of towns and smallholder farms. According to officials, the region most affected by the recent fires is a major soybean and livestock production area.“What is happening is not an accident. Five years ago, the vice president challenged agribusinesses to expand the agricultural frontier by one million hectares per year,” Solon said. “Now it has reached that figure, not of productive agricultural land but of land devastated by the flames.”Political motivationActivists say this year’s mass deforestation by fires is not only driven by economic motives, but also by political interests. In its early years, the Movement for Socialism–Political Instrument for the Sovereignty of the Peoples (MAS in Spanish) opposed biofuels. However, the group, led by Morales, later changed its platform in favor of ethanol and biodiesel, arguing that resources could be saved if Bolivia reduced its fossil fuel imports. In alliance with the country’s agroindustrial sectors, it promoted biofuel feedstock such as sugarcane as “green” energy sources.“There are direct culprits for this environmental disaster and the first one to blame is the government which has consistently passed in recent years laws of ‘forgiveness’ and promotion of the expansion of the agricultural frontier. They have also made an agricultural summit where the government, the agricultural sector of the east and communities allied to the MAS have joined,” said environmentalist Cecilia Requena. “In that summit they have decided to approve the harvest of genetically modified organisms, agrofuels, the expansion of the agricultural frontier, the export of beef to China and finally the approval of the July 9 decree that allows deforestation for agricultural purposes.”Alcides Vadillo is the regional director of the Tierra Foundation, an NGO dedicated to research into the access, use and governance of Bolivia’s land and natural resources. He says the government has been handing out areas previously classified as “permanent forest” to colonizers. “There is a lot of money at stake,” Vadillo told Mongabay.According to Requena, the government has pro-development goals that don’t mesh with 21st-century values.An ABT member assesses the impact of a fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.“This damage is irreversible and immeasurable,” Requena said. “We have no idea of ​​the dimension of the consequences, but we can say that we hope this will serve, like other disasters, to stop this suicidal drift. We need a development vision that values ​​ standing forests, not only for being vital for water but because it opens the window to an economy towards post-extractivism.”The aftermathThe Chiquitano dry forest is home to hundreds of animal and plant species, many found nowhere else in the world. In Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve alone, biologists have recorded 554 different animal species, of which 35 are endemic; 55 endemic plants have also been found there. Habitat loss is a big concern for many, as well as the outright deaths of animals and plants unable to escape the fires.“We don’t understand very well what we have lost, but we know it’s huge,” Requena said, lamenting the fires’ impacts on the region’s “enormous” biodiversity.Deforestation alerts cluster around areas previously ravaged by fire around Tucavaca Valley Municipal Reserve as more recent and ongoing fires encroach further into the reserve and the surrounding area. Sources: GLAD UMD and NASA FIRMS. “VIIRS Active Fires.” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Aug. 6, 2019.Volunteer firefighters battle a fire that expanded rapidly through the dry forest near Roboré. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.One species affected by the fires is the plant Frailea chiquitana, a cactus endemic to Santa Cruz.“The environmental damage has been elevated to a maximum power,” said biologist Kathrin Barboza. “Of the species affected, some reproduce slowly and if they die in large quantities it can take many years to recover.” She said habitat loss that happens in isolated, unique habitats like the Chiquitano dry forest could drive species to extinction.The charred remains of animals have been found in areas affected by fire. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero.Barboza said an environmental damage assessment will be needed once the fires cease.“We have to see how many hectares of forest have been damaged and see if there are species that can be rescued,” she said, adding that the forest should be monitored and studied to determine how long it may take to recover.The region’s biodiversity isn’t the only thing affected by the fires.“Among the consequences to consider [are] impacts to soil, air (increase of greenhouse gases) and water (pollution), in addition to the loss of the landscape,” said Cecilia Tapia, an environmental engineer.The fires may be over in the near future, but their consequences will be felt for much longer. Ever Durán, the president of the College of Forest Engineers of Santa Cruz (CIF-SC), estimates that it will take around 200 years for the Chiquitano to recover.Durán added that it is imperative that the government activate the national disaster declaration protocol for fires and call for international aid, not only to extinguish the fires burning now but also to assist with mitigation of future fires and restoration of previously burned forests.A grassland area near Roboré consumed by fire. Image courtesy of Jerson Bravo.Hugo Salmón, the president of the Regional Assembly of Santa Cruz, requested that the National Institute of Agrarian Reform (INRA) abolish the provision of land and the granting of settlement permits in protected areas and areas that are not already used for agricultural purposes.In response to the fires, representatives of several Santa Cruz professional associations recently issued a statement imploring the Bolivian government to stop the expansion of the agricultural frontier, and repeal laws legalizing burning in the Santa Cruz, Beni and Pando regions.“We demand and urge the government to consider that natural resources are not economic resources for a few, but [resources that support the] quality of life for all Bolivians and this will only be achieved if a sustainable framework of these resources [is maintained],” the statement reads.A plane normally used for crop-dusting is repurposed to aid firefighting near San José de Chiquitos. Image courtesy of Germain Caballero. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Amazon deforestation and development heighten Amazon fire risk: study

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer The current fires burning in the Brazilian Amazon are helping confirm the findings of a new study published this July which shows a major connection between land use and fire incidence — with deforestation and development contributing more to fire occurrence than climate change.New research shows that unrestrained deforestation, along with the construction of new highways, could expand wildfire risk in the Amazon by more than 70 percent by 2100, even inside protected areas and indigenous reserves that have relatively intact forests.Scientist suggest that efforts to improve sustainable land management and reduce future deforestation and development could offer the best defenses against the escalating threat wildfires pose due to the increased heat and drought brought by escalating climate change. Forest fires burn out of control in the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state, Brazil in 2019. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.As of August 24, there were 41,858 fires reported this year in the Brazilian Amazon — the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by that date. Likewise, the U.S. space agency NASA has shown this to be the most active fire year for the region since 2010.However, there is a major difference between 2010 and 2019. Brazil was gripped by one of the worst droughts it had seen in decades in 2010, whereas rainfall is only slightly lower than normal in 2019. So what caused this year’s non-drought related spike in destructive fires?Scientists think they may have the answer, and point to a massive uptick in deforestation between 2010 and today as a root cause.Over the last few months alone, deforestation has shot up alarmingly, with the rate in June 2019 running 88 percent higher than during the corresponding month in 2018, according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE). And with the rate soaring again in July 2019 to 278 percent , as compared with the same month a year ago, according to the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM), A Brazilian NGO.INPE reported an increase in burn scars in the Amazon, rising from 794 square kilometers last August to 1,259 square kilometers for the first 26 days of last month. For the year, INPE has recorded 46,825 hotspots in Amazonia, more than twice the number of a year ago.A new study published this July in the journal Global Change Biology, and conducted by INPE and Brazil’s Centre for Disaster Research and Monitoring (CEMADEN), confirms that if this rising deforestation trend continues, then land-use — and especially deforestation — more than climate change and drought will likely be the major driver of increases in Amazon wildfires through 2100.“Most of the current fires are related to the deforestation process,” Luiz Aragão, professor of geography and earth sciences at the University of Exeter and a study co-author told Mongabay. “If you look at the 10 municipalities with the highest deforestation rates, they are also the ones with the highest rate of fires,” he said, quoting a recent IPAM report showing that most of the 2019 increase in fires is concentrated in municipalities with higher deforestation rates.Short-term and long-term deforestation trends in the Brazilian Amazon. Annual data is based on INPE’s high resolution satellite analysis, while short-term data is based on INPE’s deforestation monitoring system DETER. * 2019 annual data should be released in November or December 2019.The link between deforestation and fire riskIt is well understood that warming temperatures, recurring prolonged drought, Amazon road development (which fragments and offers greater access to forests), and deforestation from land use change (especially the ongoing conversion of rainforests to cattle pasture and cropland), all contribute significantly to the increasing incidence of wildfires.But the big debate has been, precisely how much does each factor contribute to an uptick in fires?To find an answer, the research team modeled the different effects of land use and climate change on the Brazilian Amazon rainforest. They found that land use change alone could expand the areas at risk from wildfire by more than 70 per cent by the year 2100, even inside protected areas and indigenous reserves that have relatively intact forests.“Our paper shows that land use governance is decisive to mitigating the effects of climate change on fire probability,” said study lead author Marisa Gesteira Fonseca, a postdoctoral researcher at INPE, the agency currently responsible for the satellite monitoring of Brazil’s deforestation. “Even under the worst climate scenarios it is still important to avoid deforestation in the Amazon” in order to reduce fire risk.Looking at the probability of fire occurrence between 2041-2070, and 2071-2100 under varying land use scenarios, the research team was able to determine to what extent land use change versus climate change would effect what part of the Amazon, and even estimate how many wildfires might occur under various scenarios.“This is a significant improvement on previous papers estimating fire risk, which were much more simplistic in their modeling and assumptions about governance,” said Jos Barlow, a professor of conservation science at Lancaster University, who wasn’t involved in the research.Aragão said that the extreme intensity of the 2019 Amazon fires also helped validate the model used in the study. “If we look at the climate, we see that this year there is no sign of [severe] drought, even though we have this massive increase in fire,” but there is a significant rise in deforestation. “It really shows us that fires in the region are affected by human activities on the ground and for mitigating them, we really need to act on these [land use] players.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon thru August from 1999 to 2019. Image by Mongabay, data courtesy of INPE.Wildfires and climate change in the AmazonWhile deforestation is already recognized as an important driver of carbon emissions worldwide, wildfires are becoming an increasingly pernicious threat, even in places like the Amazon that were until recent years largely immune to widespread wildfires.Despite a recent significant uptick in deforestation, overall Brazil has seen a 75 percent decline in deforestation rates since 2004, however the rate of wildfires has increased.“What we are observing is that wildfires are becoming disconnected from the deforestation process,” said Aragão. “That means that the fire is not necessarily coming from areas that are being deforested.”A study published last year by Aragão and colleagues in the journal Nature Communications found that especially in years with lower-than-average rainfall, emissions from drought-induced fires unrelated to deforestation increasingly play a much larger role than those from deforestation, causing areas previously barely affected by fires to burn. The researchers concluded that, “in a hotter and drier future, large swaths of the Amazon, distant from the main deforestation epicenters, may burn.”Importantly, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) does not require that carbon emissions resulting from wildfires be included in a nation’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions — a significant omission considering that fires release massive amounts of carbon that would otherwise be sequestered in living, growing trees. This UN greenhouse gas source reporting loophole is especially worrisome considering the importance of the Amazon in calculating our global carbon budget — how much carbon we can “spend” before pushing past the 2 degree Celsius upper limit set by the IPCC, above which catastrophic climate change could occur.Counting forest emissions accurately is also critical to Brazil keeping its Paris Climate Agreement commitment of reducing its emissions to 37 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.In an article last year on the Conversation website, a website for academics to share research and news analysis, Barlow argued that as wildfires in once largely fire-proof rainforests like the Amazon increase, nations should prepare urgent actions aimed at mitigating the potential increase of fire emissions, in response to the intensification of droughts in tropical ecosystems.Aerial view of a large wildfire in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.Linking climate change and land-useThe recent study contributes to a growing field of research looking at the direct and indirect connection between climate change and land use policies. Globally, agriculture, deforestation, and other land use practices are responsible for roughly a quarter of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. Conversely, various reports show the tremendous potential that intact tropical forests have for combatting global warming.All of this recent research combines to make the finding of the new study, which show increased incidences of wildfire even in protected areas and indigenous reserves, more alarming.“We expected that in the worst case scenario we would find an increase [in wildfire incidence]. But the coincidence of areas of high change with indigenous lands and protected area was much larger than we thought it would be,” said Gesteira Fonseca.If deforestation and development isn’t controlled, then more than 1 million square kilometers (386,102 square miles) of indigenous lands and protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon could be subject to an increased likelihood of occurrence of wildfires by 2100, threatening both ecosystems and human populations in these areas.For Barlow, the results highlight a key issue that is now being recognized across biomes: that maintaining intact, and better yet, near-pristine ecosystems, is essential to help avoid the worst outcomes threatened by climate change. “This in itself is not new,” said Barlow, “but this paper provides a powerful and convincing set of evidence that supports it in the Amazonian context.”Even under more optimistic climate change scenarios, the socioeconomic, institutional, and environmental dynamics related to increased development and deforestation of the Amazon would dramatically increase fire probability, said the researchers.For Gesteira Fonseca and Aragão, even though the results show a higher fire incidence, the fact that land use change plays such an outsized role is in some ways a silver bullet: if we can change and improve land use practices in the Amazon, reducing deforestation and controlling development, we can also reduce the incidence of fires. “If the main variable were climate change,” said Aragão, “the scale of making a difference would be much more long term.”Citation:Fonseca, Marisa Gesteira, et al. “Effects of climate and land‐use change scenarios on fire probability during the 21st century in the Brazilian Amazon.” Global change biology 25.9 (2019): 2931-2946.Banner image caption: Forest fires burn out of control in the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Asian otters gain protection from the pet trade

first_imgArticle published by Erik Hoffner Animals, Cites, Conservation, Environment, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Pet Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade The smooth-coated otter and the Asian small-clawed otter are now on the CITES list of animals with the highest level of protection from the wildlife trade.Asian small-clawed otters are particularly sought after as domestic pets and for ‘otter cafés,’ where wild otters are forced to interact with paying customers.Conservationists say that a trade ban was vital for the survival of the two species, whose numbers in the wild have fallen by at least 30% in the past 30 years. Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted to place the smooth-coated otter and the Asian small-clawed otter on the list of animals with the highest level of protection from the wildlife trade.The recent CITES Conference of the Parties (CoP18) in Geneva, Switzerland considered many proposals and issued new protections for numerous species including giraffes, sharks and rays, and many more. CITES does not determine the risk of extinction of species, which is the domain of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and its Red List of Threatened Species, but rather CITES’ role is to ensure that international trade in wild animals does not threaten their survival in the wild.Conservationists insisted a trade ban was vital for the survival of the two species, whose numbers in the wild have fallen by at least 30% in the past 30 years.When asked how important the actions are, Paul Todd, Senior Attorney for the Nature Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told Mongabay, “The Appendix I listings for small-clawed and smooth coated otters were a vital step in reversing the decline of these species throughout their range. The range countries will have to take added measures to reduce poaching and enforce against illegal trade in the species, and the listing sends the right signals to the marketplace that these species are in trouble and are not available for use as pets or for other reasons.”A formerly wild otter in a Tokyo café bites its tail, a sign of stress. Image by Aaron Gekoski for World Animal Protection.The pet trade that supplies phenomena like ‘otter cafés’ in Japan, where customers can handle otters plucked from the wild as pups, is the most visible reminder of these animals’ plight. In these establishments, otters can be heard whimpering, shrieking and making distress calls while customers are interacting with them.Aaron Gekoski, one of the filmmakers behind the recent investigative documentary “Pet otters: the truth behind the latest wildlife craze,” told Mongabay, “During our investigation it became evident quite quickly that otters do not make good pets.” [See that interview and Gekoski’s sobering images here.]Good pets or bad ones, do these actions protect these species being trafficked for otter cafés and for the pet trade?“Yes,” says NRDC’s Todd. “Asian small-clawed otters in particular are taken as pups for use as pets and attractions, in large part because they are the smallest of the otter species and their range is nearest to where the demand is highest, especially Japan.” But, he continued, “Smooth-coated otters and even the rarest of all otters, the hairy-nosed otter, have been found in trade, including trade in live animals.”Despite these truths, the conservationist is hopeful: “The Appendix I listing will help increase enforcement attention and ensure that any trade in captive bred specimens is from legitimate sources, not from the wild.”That remains to be seen, but it’s certain that these Asian otters need all the help they can get.Banner image: Internet star Takechiyo lives in a private home and here takes a rare break from play. His owner warns against keeping otters as pets. Image by Aaron Gekoski for World Animal Protection.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

As climate change disrupts the annual monsoon, India must prepare (Commentary)

first_imgOver the past few decades, India’s total annual rainfall averages haven’t changed but the intensity of precipitation has increased as extreme weather events (EWEs) become more frequent and widespread. Today, the country witnesses more episodes of extremely heavy rainfall, as compared to the past’s consistent, well spread out seasonal rains.The nation’s meteorological department already admits that this is a clear impact of climate change. These intense storms pose a huge danger to India’s agriculture-based economy and to millions of farmers whose livelihoods still largely rely upon a consistent rainfall season. There are also periods of droughts interspersed with floods.The good news is that Indian authorities are aware of the change and are trying to tackle the impacts of shifting rainfall patterns and adapt to them.These extreme weather events are of global significance since more than 1.8 billion people live on the Indian subcontinent, and the impact in the South Asian region has economic fallout in other parts of the world. This post is a commentary. Views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. A house lies submerged in the flood-affected part of Kodagu in Karnataka, India. Image by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.From the time settled agriculture started on the Indian subcontinent millennia ago, farmers have been able to largely depend on the calendrical reliability of the monsoon rains to sustain crops. Every year, winds from the southwest picked up moisture from the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal, and delivered it as soaking rain over the land, spread out between June and September. Then, between October and December, the same winds returned from the northeast, carrying moisture to the eastern coastline.However, this consistent seasonal cycle has been disturbed in recent years, and has become a cause of great concern not only for India, but also other countries of the subcontinent, where 1.8 billion people live. The director-general of the India Meteorological Department has confirmed to Mongabay-India that the seasonal reliability of the annual monsoons has been changing. What used to be a steady combination of rains and sun is giving way to long periods of inadequate rainfall followed by intense rain; in short — drought and floods.For instance in 2019, in the state of Kerala, at the southwestern tip of the Indian peninsula, June and July were months of inadequate rains, followed by a burst of intense storms in early August, causing floods and landslides in northern districts. The Kodagu and Chikkamaguluru districts in Karnataka state, northeast of Kerala, saw the same pattern. Avalanche, a river valley in the Nilgiris Mountains of Tamil Nadu state, to the east, received more than 900 millimeters (35 inches) of rain in just one day.Mumbai, India’s commercial capital city, was flooded for weeks this year and saw bouts of intense rain following each other in quick succession. Eastward flowing rivers originating in the Western Ghats have seen increased flow and the western districts of Maharashtra, including Satara, Kolhapur and Sangli, have faced heavy floods and destruction. Northwards in Gujarat state, it was Vadodara and surrounding regions that endured the brunt of the deluge. To the north and northeast, there were floods in Himachal Pradesh, while parts of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, and Assam states were also under water.Juxtaposed to all this, the reservoirs supplying drinking water to the southern city of Chennai ran dry this summer. Chennai had devastating floods in December 2015, and since then has not received sufficient rains in subsequent monsoons.While extreme weather is not new to the monsoon, the recurring fierce intensity of these widespread storms is novel. In recent years, extreme weather events (EWEs) have become more frequent, intense and widespread.For example, when Kerala flooded in August 2018, the rains led to a domino effect of disastrous impacts. Kerala’s people were taken by surprise last year, since the previous such event happened in 1924, nearly a century ago. But similar intense rains fell in August 2019 – just a year later. Kerala was spared the devastation of 2018 this time only because the brutal rain did not happen all over the state, and the monsoon had been deficient before the EWE.A massive rain-induced landslide in Kerala that resulted in multiple fatalities. Image by Jinu S. Raj.The monsoons drive the Indian economyThe newly erratic monsoons are having a serious impact on the Indian economy, especially at this time with the nation in an all-round economic slowdown. Currently, the contribution of agriculture to India’s total GDP is only 16 percent, having been reduced over recent decades, but farming still employs nearly half of the country’s population, so a bad monsoon has a multiplier effect that cuts across all other sectors.In fact, India’s business calendar begins with the southwest monsoon, as the festival season starts after the first harvest that these rains bring. As in ages past, if you have good, helpful rains, then a bountiful harvest is almost assured, which reflects in the joyousness of the annual festival, be it Diwali or Onam. But if there is drought or floods, then a pall is drawn over the festivities, and with it bad economic spill-over into the following months.A good harvest drives domestic consumption, that gives buoyancy to the festivals and impetus to the economy. People buy clothes, goods, tractors, motorcycles and cars during such periods. A bad harvest dulls this impetus, oftentimes leading into a downward economic spiral.The impact is worse when EWEs cause destruction of public and private property and assets, striking different parts of the country near-simultaneously. And of course, EWEs, bringing bad harvests, mean more human mortality and morbidity. Farmers, businesses and enterprises of all kinds find it difficult to recover after the severe economic shock brought by an EWE.Animals swim through floodwaters in an attempt to reach safer grounds during the floods in Assam. Image by the International Fund for Animal Welfare/Wildlife Trust of India.The Post Disaster Needs Assessment Report produced by the United Nations and Kerala government estimated the state’s economic loss after the August 2018 floods at rupees 310 billion (US$ 4.4 billion). This was a heavy blow for a small state with a meager tax base. Then came the floods of 2019 bringing more ruin, even before the earlier damage was repaired and people rehabilitated.The impact of an erratic monsoon on agriculture is direct. Between 50 to 60 percent of Indian agriculture is still rainfed, without access to any form of irrigation. This makes farmers vulnerable to any change in monsoonal patterns; they rely on the rainfall’s arrival date, its even spread and consistent quantity. If it is late, seeds fail to sprout and young shoots wither; if the rains come in excess, then the plants drown. By the time the soil dries out, the rains may end, exposing the crops to end-of-season drought.Add to this the problem of the use of hybrid seeds and improved varieties tailored to produce maximum yield for a specific rainfall pattern. When the rainfall pattern changes — as is happening more frequently now — the plants deliver inadequately.Traumatized over multiple crop failures, farmers and farm labor migrate to other parts of the country to pick up other jobs or work as construction labor. Then, when an EWE strikes their new destination, they return home doubly-traumatized. Some farmers, who opt not to leave their farms even after repeated crop failures and debts, end their lives in frustration at their own hand.A coffee estate submerged in the floodwaters of the Kaveri river in Kodagu district. A preliminary survey by authorities revealed that more than 102,034 hectares (252,131 acres) of coffee plantation were damaged. Photo by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.Is India prepared?Importantly, India is aware of the EWE issue at the national policy level, and so is working to adapt. The national Economic Survey 2017-18 had a whole chapter dedicated to the impact of climate change on Indian agriculture. The survey is the document that the Union Government prepares and publishes a day before the Union Budget is presented in the parliament, and it summarizes the economic outlook for the present and future.Using the India Meteorological Department data, the survey is detailed. It has noted the increases in average annual temperature between 1975 and 2015, and changes in average annual rainfall in the same period. The number of dry days (rainfall less than 1 millimeter in a day) and wet days (rainfall more than 80 millimeters in a day) has increased. The record clearly shows that over the past four decades India has become hotter, drier, and that EWEs have become more frequent.The inclusion of climate change in the economic survey developed out of shift in political position that India made after many years of international negotiations. Starting in 1992, India’s position focused on the common but differing national responsibilities of the “equity principle,” spelled out in the provisions of climate change convention. In short, the understanding then was that climate change is a process caused by the historical and present-day greenhouse gas emissions of developed nations, and that the ability to emit carbon and grow economically is an equitable need of a developing country, such as India.It was only in 2008 that India initiated its first significant policy initiative on climate change. That’s when the Manmohan Singh government constituted the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change and when the National Plan on Climate Change was unveiled.Despite India continuing to emphasize the equity principle at the annual UN Conference of Parties (COP) at Paris in December 2015, it communicated to the world then an ambitious intended nationally determined contribution to ameliorate climate change. In Paris, India committed that, by 2030, it would reduce emissions intensity of its GDP by 33-35 percent of the 2005 value; generate 40 percent of its power needs from renewable sources; and create an additional carbon sink of 2.5 to 3 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent through additional reforestation and tree cover. Since the Paris COP, India has made good progress on the renewable energy front too.However, with the monsoons becoming erratic, India will need to do more, strengthening the climate resilience of its communities — whether they be rural villages, towns or cities. The development of effective policy planning will be especially dependent on scientific models that project scenarios at higher resolutions; at the state, district and local levels. The climate change scenarios developed by the Assessment 5 Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) only gives a South Asia-level climate change pathway, which is far too low in resolution to be useful for accurate forecasting.A dog stands amid the floodwaters of the Lakshmana Tirtha River in Hunsur, adjacent to Kodagu. Image by Abhishek N. Chinnappa.State action plans on climate change (SAPCC) were supposed to represent climate change scenarios at least up to the state level. But different states have developed SAPCCs of differing quality. While Tamil Nadu has been effective in developing a state-level projection through 2100, neighboring Kerala’s analysis has been found wanting in such granular data, and its action plan is still a work in progress.Without micro-level projections, mid- and long-term preparedness will be difficult. In recent terms, experience has shown again-and-again that preparedness plans are always seen to be lacking or insufficient when disaster strikes. Importantly, fine-tuned emergency drills will need to be developed and practiced at the local government level to protect people and property against EWEs.If India is able to begin dealing with present-day climate variability effectively, then it will be moving in the right direction to deal with future, intensifying EWE scenarios. As of now, climate change seems to have come knocking early, and there is no way of predicting with precision what path it will take in the coming decades. Preparedness is the best way forward.Banner image caption: People move through a flooded street in Kerala. Image by Vimith Shal.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Adaptation, Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change Policy, climate policy, Climate Science, Disasters, Drought, Emission Reduction, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Extreme Weather, Flooding, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, Precipitation, United Nations center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Bonobo conservation stymied by deforestation, human rights abuses

first_imgAnimals, Apes, Bonobos, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Environment, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Land Rights, Logging, Military, Mining, Old Growth Forests, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife The bonobo is a relative of the chimpanzee, and is found only in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) south of the Congo River. They are endangered, with habitat loss and the bushmeat trade their primary threats. The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the DRC’s largest nature reserve that is focused on bonobo conservation. However, deforestation rates have only increased in Sankuru since it was created in 2007. Meanwhile nearby Lomami National Park is experiencing almost no deforestation.Researchers attribute the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter. They claim that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.However, there may be a dark side to Lomami’s success. Sources claim that the military, which is tasked with protecting DRC’s national parks, have engaged in torture of people suspected of poaching. There are also reports that a community within Lomami was displaced without proper consultation or a suitable alternative location.Researchers say that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Bonobos, unlike closely related chimpanzees, choose love over war. But with each passing year, there is less room in this world for these amorous primates as the world’s largest bonobo refuge continues to lose thousands of hectares of rainforest to agricultural expansion.Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Modern chimpanzees and bonobos likely diverged from a common ancestor some 1.5 to 2 million years ago after their territory was separated by the formation of the Congo River, the world’s second largest river.Bonobos are only found on the southern side of the Congo River in the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Culturally, the bonobos are very different from the chimpanzees, choosing to live in matriarchal societies and engage in sexual rather than aggressive behavior to resolve conflict. Bonobo survey data has been difficult to obtain because of longstanding, violent conflict in the region and the remoteness of their forest habitat, but the IUCN reports the species population is endangered and in decline.The Sankuru Nature Reserve is the country’s largest nature reserve created for bonobo conservation. Sally Coxe, founder and president at Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI), said the idea for the reserve arose from a grassroots movement organized by local NGO Community Action for the Kasai Primates (ACOPRIK), which was formed in 2001 to address increasing hunting pressure on primates in the area.“With support from BCI, Sankuru conservation leader Heritier Mpo rescued an orphan bonobo named Esake that we successfully delivered to Lola ya Bonobo earlier this year,” Coxe said. “Bonobos are being hunted in parts of Sankuru; with renewed support, BCI and partners plan to strengthen bonobo monitoring and protection and conduct an awareness and anti-poaching campaign.” Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.ACOPRIK eventually reached out to the BCI for assistance in creating a community-controlled protected area. The DRC’s national authority overseeing protected areas, the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), performed its own assessment at Sankuru, and decided to prioritize the area for official protection in 2007. At this point, Coxe said an agreement was made with the local communities who agreed to no longer hunt bonobos, and to join together to create a community-managed nature reserve.“As its name indicates, the Sankuru Nature Reserve is not a national park; it is a nature reserve,” Coxe told Mongabay in an email. “It is controlled and managed locally… The people of Sankuru remain the stewards of their own land.”Coxe said biological surveys taken at the time of its creation revealed rich biodiversity, with “rare and endemic species including the okapi, bonobos, and at least ten other species of primates including the rare owl faced monkey and blue monkey, as well as Congo peafowl and forest elephants.”At the time of its creation, Sankuru was heralded as the largest protected area for great ape conservation in the world. However, the reserve has continued to lose thousands of hectares of forest every year. Satellite data from the University of Maryland (UMD) show Sankuru lost over 136,000 hectares of primary rainforest between 2001 and 2018. Further, deforestation appears have accelerated since the park was created in 2007, with over half of 2001-2018 tree cover loss – 70,800 hectares – happening between 2014 and 2018. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate the reserve is currently in the midst of another big year for deforestation.Satellite data show high levels of deforestation in Sankuru Nature Reserve this year while neighboring Lomami National Park has remained almost entirely unscathed. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite imagery shows much of the deforestation Sankuru has experienced over the past 20 years has been concentrated concentrated near towns, as well as along roads and paths that traverse the reserve. Coxe said Sankuru’s deforestation is primarily caused by expanding agriculture.“The deforestation that does exist at Sankuru stems largely from swidden (aka slash and burn) agriculture,” Coxe said. “People have inhabited this forest for centuries, and are part of its ecosystem. People are also the [primary] threat to bonobos and biodiversity.”In addition to habitat loss caused by deforestation, bonobos are threatened by the bushmeat trade. While traditional bushmeat hunting is one of the primary food and income sources for forest-dwelling people and communities in the DRC, the bushmeat trade has become increasingly commercialized with meat and animal parts sold in large cities, and even exported to other continents.The bushmeat trade has expanded partly alongside the logging industry as roads built to transport machinery, loggers and timber also give commercial hunters access to previously unreachable populations of wildlife, including chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas.The okapi (Okapia johnstoni) is a unique and endangered relative of the giraffe, and is only found in the DRC. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Terese Hart, who is the American director of the TL2 Project and the Lukuru Foundation, was instrumental in pushing the DRC government’s creation of the nearby Lomami National Park in 2016. In contrast to Sankuru, with which it shares a border, there has been very little deforestation happening within the Lomami National Park, according to satellite data from UMD.In 2009, the Wildlife Conservation Society conducted a survey in 30 percent of Sankuru. The survey only found nine old bonobo nests situated in one four-kilometer area near the eastern edge of the reserve, and found no evidence of elephants or other large mammals. Hart said her team found evidence of bonobos and okapis near the Lomami river on the eastern side of the reserve, but the elephants “were killed off years ago.”Community-based versus national park conservation modelsHart told Mongabay that she attributes the disparity in deforestation rates between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park to the lack of human settlements and clearer managerial strategy in the latter.“There are no villages in the Lomami National Park,” Hart said. “Because it is a national park there is a clear statement of what is and is not permitted within its borders. The Reserve has no such clarity.”Hart claimed that Sankuru lacked buy-in from the local communities, and that conflicting land claims made conservation efforts more difficult to achieve.“The human landscape is particularly problematic as several ethnic groups are mixed together with conflicting land claims. One can please one group and almost certainly cause an uprising in another,” Hart said.Coxe argued that Sankuru’s community-based approach to conservation may have been ahead of its time, and its current lack of effectiveness is a consequence of inadequate funds. She contrasted this to the hardline conservation approach taken by Lomami National Park.Essylot Lubala of the Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestiere en RDC (OGF) participated in stakeholder meetings and “information exchange” with Sankuru communities, according to Sally Coxe. Here he is standing by an area of savannah within the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Image courtesy of Sally Coxe.“Protected areas that are community co-managed are relatively new in the DRC, and remain the poor and neglected cousins of African national parks,” Coxe said. “The Sankuru Nature Reserve is a multi-zoned, community-managed protected area. By contrast, Lomami is a national park, and people who had been living within its borders were expelled.”Human rights abuses cloud national parkIn the years before the Lomami National Park was created, a village called Obenge used to occupy territory which is now within the park’s borders. According to Hart, the “bushmeat” village had planned to move long before the park or any protected area was set up. She said the inhabitants agreed to leave after they were promised a new village in a different location by German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ) and World Bank, which has yet to materialize.“Although GIZ provided materials which are now being used by TL2 to build their houses, the World Bank has done nothing. These long delays are very regrettable but it should be noted that the first move of Obenge away from its original site had nothing to do with the park,” Hart said.Mongabay reached out to the World Bank to get their take, but received no response by the time this story was published.Bonobos are different than chimpanzees in many ways – they have smaller heads, darker faces, and longer hair that part down the middle. They’re also more likely to walk on two legs. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Maud Salber, who is Senior Project Coordinator for Rainforest Foundation UK, told Mongabay by email that her team surveyed 28 villages neighboring Lomami National Park to document local and indigenous communities’ perceptions of the park and conservation enforcement. She has a different account of what happened to Obenge.“Communities first left Obenge in 2013 to seek refuge from clashes between armed groups in the area. A number of people returned but they were then forced out by government forces in 2017 to make way for the park, without proper consultation,” Salber said.“They haven’t had a say in the relocation site, which they describe as wholly inadequate for their livelihoods, and the promised houses and infrastructure have not yet all been built. The process clearly did not adhere to international standards – no consultation, no compensation and no clear plan in place to compensate their loss of livelihoods”Salber said there was an effort to redraw the park’s boundaries to avoid villages, but even so, many communities lost access to significant parts of their customary lands traditionally used for hunting, fishing or gathering — putting a strain on already tenuous livelihoods. Further, she said communities complained about being harassed by park authorities who abused power for personal gain, with reported human rights abuses, and a case of sexual assault.Dr. Mwanza Ndunda, general director of the Congolese Center for Multidisciplinary Research traverses a bridge on a mission in Sankuru. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Additionally, Hart has written on her blog site that an innocent local was tortured because DRC military park guards mistook him to be an informant for a poaching warlord Thoms who has allegedly raped local women and murdered several park guards assigned to protect elephants. However, Hart said the person whom soldiers accused of collaborating with Thoms turned out to be a medicine salesman who happened to be in the wrong village at the wrong time.Hart said that the human rights abuses that are committed by park authorities are “regrettable,” but “the truth is very complicated… ‘best practices’ are difficult to assure in truly remote areas where there is no police force or government presence.”In 2017, UN Human Rights Chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein called on the DRC to halt the military from committing widespread human rights abuses. The DRC military primarily oversees the country’s exploitation of resources and protects business interests for the elites.Hart said her private NGOs had “no say” on the UN human rights chief’s call for ending DRC military abuse. She did not point to any clear steps that have been taken by park authorities to assure that human rights abuses are not committed in the future. Mongabay received no response to emails sent to DRC government offices.Grant land tenure to save the bonobos?The U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has included indigenous rights in its 2019 Special Report on Climate Change and Land, recognizing that the participation of Indigenous peoples is crucial to combating global climate change by preventing deforestation and preserving ecosystems.Salber believes there is a way that bonobos and other endangered wildlife can be conserved without causing human right abuses of indigenous forest-dwelling people. “The current trend towards more militarisation of conservation efforts certainly is not the way to go,” Salber said.“We have worked with a lot of communities around the park and it is clear that they are very committed to conserving resources for future generations. Conservation and anti-poaching efforts should engage with these communities.”Headquarters of Action Communautaire pour la Protection des Primates du Kasai (ACOPRIK), the local Sankuru NGO that spearheaded creation of the Sankuru Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Sally Coxe.Salber says that to ensure effective engagement, indigenous forest-dwelling communities should be granted proper security of tenure over their lands, and community-managed forests should be set up and funded around the perimeter of the park. Hart appeared to agree, saying that Sankuru should pursue a “series of community conservation projects around specific points of importance” in order to pull the brakes on deforestation and bonobo habitat loss.The 2013 book Of Bonobos and Men by Deni Béchard details a history of clashing approaches between Sankuru Nature Reserve and Lomami National Park, which both aim to protect the same particularly biodiverse area, home to large bonobos and okapi populations, near the Lomami River. In the book, Coxe reportedly said that conservationists dedicated to saving the great apes need to work together more, “to be more bonobo-like about conservation” because “there is a huge challenge saving the bonobos and very few people are available to work on it.” Banner image by DORIS META F via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).Data citation: Hansen, M.C., A. Krylov, A. Tyukavina, P.V. Potapov, S. Turubanova, B. Zutta, S. Ifo, B. Margono, F. Stolle, and R. Moore. 2016. Humid tropical forest disturbance alerts using Landsat data. Environmental Research Letters, 11 (3). Accessed through Global Forest Watch on October 23, 2019. www.globalforestwatch.orgEditor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.If you’re interested in bonobo conservation, watch more here:Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Update (October 30, 2019): After this article was published, Terese Hart (American director of the TL2 Project) and Jo Thompson (Lukuru Foundation President / Executive Director and Lukuru Project Director) reached out with more information. Hart refutes Rainforest Foundation UK’s account that the Obenge community was forced out of Lomami National Park, while Thompson lends her comments regarding the difficulties surrounding the training of Lomami park guards and the efficacy of the Community Concession conservation strategy.Hart: “Contrary to the information you have, the Obenge community chose its own relocation site. Among themselves there was no immediate consensus for a single site, but internally they came to an agreement to use the past site of Bangaliwa (abandoned village location) which was in the same groupement and maintained the advantage of relatively “easy” communication to the east (Mituku sector) where many have relatives. We had actually favored the option, promoted by another faction, for a more distant site (also abandoned village) that was closer to markets, but when there was general agreement for Bangaliwa we all tried to make the new Obenge2 possible. A couple years ago, before the creation of the park, we wrote a fairly detailed history of Obenge before and during its move. The community has not forgotten perceived “promises” made by World Bank and others. Our own FZS-TL2project has limited means to satisfy these, but construction with metal roofs is underway, thanks to materials donated by GIZ for that purpose. The advantage that Obenge has in its current location is that many of its citizens have regular work through the park. Some are Park Guards and others work part time or full time with our own project.”Thompson: “There is little evidence that community reserves conserve bonobos.  At this point there are few (if any) examples to indicate that Community Concessions will have better success than National Reserves at protecting bonobos and controlling natural resource exploitation.  In some areas human population pressure is high, in many areas resource exploitation is the only means to acquire cash despite the fact that populations are rising.  So how would individual communities deal with this? What needs to be written into each management plan?  What outside support needs to continue to be available to these communities?  We actually proposed in 2012 that a halo of community concession (communities with land tenure) be created around the Lomami National Park.  Our expectation is that they might be a first step towards improved ability for stewardship.  But it is only a small first step.The current Head Warden of the Lomami National Park is very much in favor of training guards in human rights and respectful law enforcement.  The warden before him was as well.  The problem (as mentioned by Sally Coxe) often comes down to financing.  The trainers must be brought in.  The guards must all cycle through.  Logistics, rations, evaluation all must be paid for.We are very much in favor of a more professional and humane park guard force, but that will be a small part in the huge reinforcement needed for a lawful and humane society at all levels.  The solution we hope for and most of us who live and work here, Congolese and non-Congolese alike, hope for, is a strengthened and expanded Judicial system, a re-trained and better-supported police force deployed throughout the territory and a smaller focused domestic role for a more restrained military.  That is a problem of finances and political will.  We don’t get discouraged — the stakes are too high — but there is not one simple solution and long involvement and commitment is needed on the ground to understand and support the human communities and the incredible wildlife diversity of this country.”center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, November 8, 2019

first_imgThere are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsResearchers have found a species of dragonfly in Costa Rica that was previously unknown to science (Sci-News).Less funding goes into protecting the Congo rainforest compared to its counterparts in South America and Southeast Asia (CIFOR Forests News).Researchers use a 325-meter (1,070-foot) tower to study the canopy of the Amazon (New Scientist).Locusts are threatening crops already struggling as a result of drought (Sustainability Times).Top palm oil producers are investing heavily in a radar system aimed at stopping deforestation (Reuters).Rubber is driving deforestation in Cameroon (France24).A Malaysian state chief is calling on farmers and plantation workers to help in the fight against poaching, after three elephants were killed in five weeks (Malay Mail).After the signing of a peace accord in Colombia, researchers now have the access necessary to protect the endangered wax palm, the country’s national tree (The New York Times).Rafts of research show the value that indigenous communities bring in protecting the forest (Los Angeles Times).A “mast fruiting” event in Malaysia has spurred an effort by conservationists to save threatened tree species (Science Magazine).Other newsPresident Trump has begun the year-long process of pulling the United States out of the Paris climate accords, a move critics have called “reprehensible” and “sad” (Mother Jones, The Atlantic, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The New York Times).Emissions of gas that damages the ozone layer are sliding after a recent rise (The New York Times).Lionfish have moved into the Atlantic Ocean, threatening native communities (Biographic).Conservation and indigenous groups in Canada consider wiping out all fish in a lake to get rid of invasive species (Hakai Magazine).Coal-fired power plants in the U.S. will soon be able to allow more toxic chemicals to seep into water sources with new rule changes from the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency (The New York Times, The Washington Post).China is set to release plans for a new national park system, raising questions in the conservation community (Biographic).North American mussel populations are battling a new form of cancer that comes from invasive species from Europe and South America (The New York Times).Wildfires are worse in areas where invasive grasses have moved in (The New York Times).Thousands of scientists lay out a six-step plan to address the climate “emergency” (The Washington Post).Making the world a more equitable place could help address issues like climate change, a researcher says (The New York Times).The researcher who argued first that fish could feel pain has died at age 52 (The New York Times).Australia moves to outlaw climate-related protests in an apparent bid to protect the country’s coal sector (The New York Times).Banner image of a lionfish by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more