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Celebrity Partners Up with Ghana University on Recruiting Female Bridge Officers

first_imgUS-based cruise line Celebrity Cruises has entered into a partnership with the Regional Maritime University (RMU) in Ghana which will enable female bridge officers to be openly recruited from a West African country for the first time in the cruise industry. As informed, on August 27, 2017, the cruise line will welcome the first official crew member from the Celebrity Cadet Program, RMU Cadet Nicholine Tifuh Azirh, who will join the bridge team onboard Celebrity Equinox.The partnership with RMU came about when Celebrity’s President and CEO Lisa Lutoff-Perlo met with students from the Mandela Washington Fellowship at Florida International University (FIU). There, the CEO met Tifuh Azirh who shared her “inspiring story of perseverance”. Tifuh Azirh holds two degrees, yet following graduation she struggled to find opportunities in the maritime industry as an African female despite her academic performance, subsequent teaching at RMU, and cadet experience.“After hearing Nicholine’s story, I met with our SVP of Global Marine Operations, Patrik Dahlgren, to see what we needed to do in order to give her, and others, the opportunities they’ve earned. A year later, I’m so excited to share the news of our partnership with RMU and to welcome Nicholine on board,” Lutoff-Perlo said.“Nicholine isn’t just a new-hire, she symbolizes hope for women around the world who dream of working in a very male-dominated industry; she’s the face of our industry-leading partnership,” Lutoff-Perlo added.“Nicholine’s success is our entire world’s success. Her story shows the power of win-win partnerships and the positive impact they have on our communities – and beyond,” Mark B. Rosenberg, FIU President, commented.“The goal of our partnership with RMU is to inspire and disrupt the social norms that burden female officers in western African nations, such as Ghana,” Patrik Dahlgren, SVP of Global Marine Operations, Celebrity Cruises, pointed out.“Nicholine is our pioneer cadet and a pioneer for women in her country; moving forward, we will continue to evaluate candidates and continue to push the envelope in developing a growth sector for marine officers in a part of the world that traditionally underserves female officers,” Dahlgren concluded.last_img read more

UEFA proposal: Elite clubs to play every three days to finish Champions League

first_img The knock-on effect would mean the group stages of next season’s competitions would not start until 20 October, a month after they usually begin. Holders Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur have been knocked out of the Champions League, but Manchester City await their second leg match with Real Madrid and Chelsea are yet to face the trip to Bayern Munich at the last 16 stage. City stunned Real Madrid to win 2-1 at the Santiago Bernabeu in their first leg match, while Chelsea have only a slither of hope of reaching the quarter-finals after losing 3-0 at home to Bayern Munich. Meanwhile, no Europa League second legs have been played so Manchester United and Wolverhampton Wanderers await news of how the tournament will progress. read also:Valencia drag Spanish FA to UEFA over European spots proposal The Red Devils already have one foot in the last eight after thrashing LASK Linz 5-0 in the first leg of their last 16 tie, while Wolves ’ hopes hang in the balance after the spoils were shared in a 1-1 draw at Olympiacos. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 European football’s governing body insists that finishing domestic leagues is the priority – but they are drawing up plans to complete this season’s Champions League and Europa League competitions Europe’s elite clubs may need to play matches every three days to ensure the Champions League and Europa League finish in August. Governing body UEFA will meet in the next few days to agree to a plan so that both competitions – currently at the last 16 stage – can be completed after domestic leagues have finished. UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin will chair the meetings via video link after telling all 55 associate members that domestic leagues are the priority in terms of completing the season. One idea to be discussed would see the semi-finals and finals of the two competitions played over five days in Istanbul and Gdansk – the venues for the Champions League final and Europa League final respectively. This plan would see the Champions League final played on 29 August and the Europa League final played three days later.Advertisement Loading… Promoted Content7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black HolesThe Best Cars Of All TimeYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More10 Actors And Actresses Whose Careers Were Boosted By Soap OperasA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of ArtWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universelast_img read more

Batesville Rumpke Trash Collection Schedule Change

first_imgBATESVILLE — Rumpke’s last day for twice weekly garbage collection will be on Friday, October 17.State Road 46 East, East Pearl Street, West Pearl Street and County Line Road will serve as the dividing line for this weekly pick-up. Residences and businesses north of this line will be collected on Tuesdays, with the remainder of the city collected on Fridays.The collection of recyclables will remain as is, on a weekly schedule.City officials say pick-up for brush and limbs must be bundled, and cannot exceed four feet in length and two feet in diameter. Branches cannot be thicker than four inches around. Bundles cannot weigh more than 50 pounds. Brush or limbs should not be placed in plastic bags.To dispose of paint in cans, the paint must be completely dried with a note attached stating: Dried Paint. Mixing equal amounts of inexpensive kitty litter with liquid paint, and leaving the lid off for about a week should dry out the paint for proper disposal.As a reminder, Rumpke is not responsible for the collection of bagged leaves. The Batesville Street Department will begin the process of curbside pick-up of leaves mid-October.Officials ask residents to not gather leaves and pile along streets until the notice is published, due to probable clogged storm drains. The City also requests garbage containing liquids be drained before placing in trash bags for collection. This will assist in minimizing the potential for unwanted liquids draining on the streets during the collection process.last_img read more

Panthera: At least 500 jaguars lost their lives or habitat in Amazon fires

first_imgThe fires in the Amazon forest in Brazil and Bolivia this year have burned key habitats of at least 500 adult, resident jaguars as of September 17, experts at Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization, estimate. The numbers will continue to increase until the rains come, researchers say.In Bolivia in particular, the fires have so far destroyed over 2 million hectares of forest in one of South America’s key “catscape”, a region that Panthera has identified as having the highest predicted density of cat species on the continent.Panthera researchers also predict that many more jaguars will also likely starve or turn to killing livestock in neighboring ranches as a consequence of the fires, likely increasing conflict with the ranchers. The fires ravaging the Amazon forest in Brazil and Bolivia this year have burned key habitats of at least 500 adult, resident jaguars as of Sept. 17, rendering them dead or homeless, say experts at Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization.“The number of homeless or dead jaguars has undoubtedly increased since Panthera’s estimate was released, and will continue to increase until the rains come,” Esteban Payan, Panthera’s South America regional director, told Mongabay in an email.To estimate the number of affected jaguars (Panthera onca), Panthera researchers used the total area of jaguar habitat burned, taken from burned areas reported by the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and the Environmental Secretariat of the Governor’s office of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. They combined this with a jaguar density estimate of 2.5 jaguars per 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) derived from a 2018 study authored by jaguar experts.“Density from jaguar populations in central Amazonia, the work from my Ph.D., was more around 3 animals in 100 square kilometers. So again, this is ‘at least’ that number [500] of jaguars impacted,” Payan said.In Bolivia in particular, the fires have so far destroyed more than 2 million hectares (4.9 million acres) of forest in one of South America’s key “catscapes,” a region that Panthera has identified as having the highest predicted density of cat species on the continent. Some parts of Bolivia’s catscape are home to eight cat species, including the jaguar, puma (Puma concolor), ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), margay (Leopardus wiedii), oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi), Geoffrey’s cat (Leopardus geoffroyi) and Pampas cat (Leopardus colocola).Map showing burned areas in Bolivia and wild cat presence. Image courtesy of Panthera.Some researchers estimate that millions of animals have likely been lost to the Amazon fires this year. But given the widespread and destructive nature of the fires this year, the exact number of jaguars killed is difficult to calculate. Panthera researchers, however, predict that hundreds of jaguars will starve or turn to killing livestock in neighboring ranches as a consequence of the fires, “where they will be hunted down,” Payan said.Increased interactions between jaguars and livestock will likely only intensify conflict between the animals and ranchers and farmers. This would throw a spanner in the efforts of conservationists who’ve been working to resolve this conflict for decades.“Jaguars with GPS collars from our partner Oncafari in the Brazilian Pantanal have already been captured and moved from the fires in an attempt to protect the cats,” Payan said.In addition to jaguars, Panthera has obtained reports and captured images of pumas and ocelots fleeing the fires, as well as of animals that burned to death, both small, slow-moving ones like turtles, tortoises and caimans, and fast-moving ones like marsh deer and peccaries. “Fires don’t burn in a straight line so many animals get trapped in circles of fire and many others die of thirst and heat even before fire touches them,” Payan said.Burned habitat in the Brazilian Pantana. Image by Oncafari.Fires not only destroy critical habitats, they also fragment forests, reducing connectivity between habitats that animals need to live and thrive. Moreover, repeated burning of the Amazon forest every year — almost entirely lit by humans to clear land for ranches, pastures or agriculture land — has compromised the forest’s ability to recover when some of the burned areas are eventually abandoned and allowed to regenerate, researchers have found.“The shock waves of these exceptionally large and, for the most part, human-lit fires are being felt not only by the wildlife and people of Brazil and Bolivia, but also those in Peru and Paraguay,” Howard Quigley, Panthera’s jaguar program and conservation science executive director, said in a statement. “These fires stand to directly impact the continent, and in the end, the health of the planet as they hurt one of the cradles of biodiversity and greatest counter forces against global warming.”Overall, the fires will affect Panthera’s efforts to create one of the world’s largest, contiguous jaguar corridors across South America’s Pantanal region. But Payan said that the team is hoping to address this by scaling up its cooperation with communities, first responders, local NGOs, and protected-area managers; better equipping rangers to manage fires in protected areas; reducing cattle losses to jaguars and increasing productivity on existing ranches to limit further deforestation; and working with landowners, businesses and governments to plan and manage lands responsibly.“Fire is now an intensified threat to jaguars and their associated biodiversity because of its intensity, speed and scale,” he said. “The intensity of destruction is nearly absolute, the speed of propagation implies that in minutes it can become nearly impossible to control, and as it will cover vast areas the scale of damage to the natural world is immense.”Marsh deer in Bolivia, one of the jaguar’s prey. Image by Juan Carlos Urgel.Banner image of a jaguar by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Jaguars, Mammals, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildlife center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

A ‘sly’ species of leaf-tailed gecko uncovered from Madagascar

first_imgScientists have described a new species of leaf-tailed gecko, Uroplatus fetsy, believed to be found only in Madagascar’s Ankarana Special Reserve.All Uroplatus species are endemic to Madagascar and are best known for their leaf-like tails and coloration that allow them to blend into the foliage.Though newly described, U. fetsy may already be at risk: the dry deciduous forests of the reserve are severely threatened by illegal logging, cattle grazing, fires, and artisanal mining.The authors of the paper describing the new species say it could warrant endangered status on the IUCN Red List because of these threats to its habitat. Until they looked into the mouth of a leaf-tailed gecko collected in Madagascar last year, scientists couldn’t be sure they were looking at a new species of lizard. The specimen looked remarkably similar to a known species, Uroplatus ebenaui, known as the spearpoint leaf-tailed gecko and found only in Madagascar.Indeed, when the first specimen was collected in 2004, it was believed to be of an U. ebenaui. At first glance, apart from a slightly longer tail and smoother skin on its back, there was little to distinguish it from the spearpoint leaf-tailed gecko. The first clue to its distinctiveness came from its genetic differentiation from U. ebenaui. “We then had to find more animals to make sure that these genetic results were not an anomaly,” said Mark D. Scherz, a herpetologist at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology in Munich.A tissue sample collected in 2011 confirmed the genetic differences. However, it wasn’t until scientists got their hands on a new specimen in 2018 that the morphological differences became evident. The inside of U. ebenaui’s mouth is totally black, while the new species has red patches on the sides of its mouth cavity. (Mouth coloration has emerged as an important distinguishing feature for  geckos in this genus.  Another recently described Uroplatus species, U. finaritra, was identified in part from its mouth color.)A specimen of Uroplatus ebenaui collected from Nosy Be in April 2019. Image Courtesy: Mark D. ScherzThe new species, also known only from Madagascar, has now been formally described as Uroplatus fetsy in a recent paper in the journal Zootaxa. The name comes from the Malagasy word for “sly,” in reference to the species’ elusiveness and the way its mouth appears to curl upwards giving the impression of a wicked smile.“The species was discovered quite a long time ago, but we didn’t manage to collect enough individuals for a long time because it is very rare and hard to find,” Scherz said.U. fetsy is found in and around Ankarana Special Reserve in northwest Madagascar, where dry savanna and dry deciduous forests mingle with towering jagged limestone formations that date back to the Jurassic Period, called tsingy. Spread across 182 square kilometers (70 square miles), the park has thrown up new species with astonishing regularity.The newly described gecko appears to be restricted to the reserve, while U. ebenaui enjoys a wider range in northern Madagascar. But the forests of Ankarana are under severe threat from illegal logging, cattle grazing, fires, and artisanal mining. Given the new species’ limited range and the pressures it faces, the authors of the recent paper recommend classifying it as near threatened or endangered on the IUCN Red List. The wider-ranging U. ebenaui is listed as vulnerable.“Although it is found inside a protected area, the forests around Ankarana are often being burned or cut down, so the species may be endangered,”  Scherz said. “But we don’t know if it might be a little more widespread, which would reduce the risk somewhat.”Leaf-tailed geckos are nocturnal creatures, best known for their tails that resemble dead leaves or tree bark and that, along with their coloration, allow them to blend into the foliage. (Uroplatus comes from the Greek words for “tail” and “flat.”) Prior to the description of U. fetsy, there were 18 recognized species in the genus Uroplatus, all endemic to Madagascar.But the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology alone holds specimens of several candidate Uroplatus species that remain undescribed. Madagascar, the fourth-largest island in the world, supports a breathtaking array of endemic species due to its long geographic isolation. Some scientists fear that some of these species are being driven to extinction even before we become properly acquainted with them.Citation: Ratsoavina, F. M., Scherz, M. D., Tolley, K. A., Raselimanana, A. P., Glaw, F., & Vences, M. (2019). A new species of Uroplatus (Gekkonidae) from Ankarana National Park, Madagascar, of remarkably high genetic divergence. Zootaxa, 4683(1), 84-96. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4683.1.4Banner Image: A specimen of the recently-described Uroplatus fetsy. Image Courtesy: Mark D. ScherzMalavika Vyawahare is the Madagascar staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Lizards, New Species, Protected Areas, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by malavikavyawaharelast_img read more

Largest coral reef survey in French Polynesia offers hope

first_imgResearchers who studied and mapped coral reefs in French Polynesia over a seven-month expedition in 2012-13, have found that French Polynesia had one of the world’s healthiest corals, and some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish on the planet at the time of the surveys.Not all areas were doing well — in places that had been severely damaged in the early 2000s by tropical cyclones and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish, coral cover was extremely low.But the team observed new corals coming up at some of the damaged sites, suggesting that “there may be pockets of resilience in French Polynesia’s reefs.” Over the course of seven months in 2012 and 2013, more than 70 scientists collaborated to study and map the coral reefs around the islands of French Polynesia in the South Pacific.This was a huge undertaking. Researchers covered over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles), including places never studied by scientists before. They conducted nearly 4,000 coral reef and fish surveys in 264 dive sites across 29 islands, and mapped over 9,300 square kilometers (3,590 square miles) using satellite imagery. No other coral reef survey in French Polynesia has been conducted at this scale, said Renée Carlton, a marine ecologist with the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation.Findings from this massive expedition, published in a new report, offer hope. At the time of the surveys, French Polynesia had one of the world’s healthiest coral covers, and some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish on the planet.The surveys were part of the Global Reef Expedition (GRE), a global mission supported by the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation that aimed to map coral reefs around the world.“The goal of the Global Reef Expedition was to collect as much data as possible on the status of coral reefs, given the rapid changes we are seeing to reefs around the world,” Carlton told Mongabay. “Having a baseline understanding of the status of coral reefs is important for scientists and managers alike.”Researcher surveying a reef. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.The French Polynesia surveys threw some surprises. The live coral cover on Gambier archipelago, for example, was “extraordinary”, the researchers write, averaging 58 percent and reaching nearly 70 percent in some parts. These numbers are high not just for French Polynesia but for the whole of South Pacific, the researchers add.Similarly, Tuamotu archipelago, which also had very high coral cover, showcased some of the highest diversity and density of reef fish species compared to many other countries surveyed on the GRE, with an average of about 300 individuals per 100 square meters.“To date, these are still some of the highest observations of these metrics in the South Pacific,” Carlton said. “The coral cover we saw in Gambier was unheard of for the region, and was some of the highest coral cover we observed on the entire Global Reef Expedition.”“It’s nice to see that places like that still exist,” Nancy Knowlton, a coral reef biologist emeritus with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., told Science Magazine.Mass grouper spawning aggregation in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.The survey researchers are yet to pinpoint the factors that have allowed Gambier and Tuamotu archipelagoes to have healthier corals and fish communities compared to other places. But they suspect that both environmental conditions and human pressure could have something to do with the observed patterns.“With regards to the fish populations in Tuamotu, lower fishing pressure is likely contributing to the healthier reef fish communities,” Carlton said. “The area is also known as a particularly important breeding site for groupers so there are likely environmental factors contributing to this as well.”In the Gambier archipelago, fewer people live, she added, so factors like sedimentation and localized runoff that can otherwise lead to reef degradation, are not big problems.“There are environmental conditions that may be contributing to the higher coral cover as well — factors such as food availability, nutrients, presence of other benthic organisms, fish and invertebrate populations all contribute to a healthy reef,” Carlton said. “This is one thing we’re still trying to understand and are using data from the Global Reef Expedition to parse out possible areas of refuge and identifying reefs that might have higher resilience to environmental changes and Gambier is certainly one we’re going to be focusing on.”A grey reef shark in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Not all coral reefs in French Polynesia were doing well at the time of the surveys, though.Some parts of Society and Austral archipelagoes, for instance, had been severely damaged in the early 2000s by tropical cyclones and outbreaks of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (COTS), a large seastar that feeds on coral polyps. These regions had very low coral cover of around five to eight percent.“While COTS outbreaks aren’t unheard of, seeing the damage first-hand was initially shocking,” Carlton said.It’s been six years since the surveys, but the threats remain. In fact, with human-induced climate change, cyclones are expected to be bigger and stronger, Carlton said. Rising sea temperatures have been causing widespread coral reef bleaching, and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish continue to occur.However, during the surveys, the team observed new corals coming up at some of the damaged sites, which the researchers say is an encouraging finding.“Our research shows that there may be pockets of resilience in French Polynesia’s reefs,” Carlton said in a statement. “I am hopeful that in the face of continued natural and anthropogenic pressures, the coral reefs of French Polynesia will continue to flourish.”Since the expedition, local researchers and partners are continuing to monitor the survey sites, Carlton added.“We have shared our findings with managers and ministers in French Polynesia, as well as partners on the ground that are working toward this currently, so we’re hopeful they can use the data we provide to further protect French Polynesia’s coral reefs,” she said.Healthy reef system with a variety of coral and fish. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Acropora branching coral in French Polynesia. Image © Michele Westmorland/iLCP.Citation:Global Reef Expedition: French Polynesia. Final Report. Purkis, S., Dempsey, A., Carlton, R.D., Andréfouët, S., Samaniego, B., Rauer, E.M., and Renaud, P.G. (2017) Khaled Bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Annapolis, MD. Vol 5: 80p. Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Fish, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Islands, Research, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Photos: Top 15 new species of 2019

first_imgNiemitz’s tarsier from the Togean Islands of Indonesia. Image courtesy of Shekelle et al., 2019.Scientists Alexandra Nietsch and Carsten Niemitz first spotted this tarsier on the Togean Islands off Sulawesi, Indonesia, in 1993. Locals have known of the primate by the names bunsing, tangkasi and podi. But it took researchers more than 25 years of detailed study, including the tarsier’s vocalization and DNA, to finally describe the small primate as a species that’s new to science in a paper published in 2019. They named the species Niemitz’s tarsier (Tarsius niemitzi) in honor of the scientist who was one of the first to bring it to the attention of the scientific world. The description of Niemitz’s tarsier has increased the number of known tarsier species in Sulawesi and surrounding islands to 12, but the authors say the islands could be home to at least 16.6. Some of these nine newly described Fijian bees are restricted to a single mountaintopHomalictus terminalis is found only within 95 meters of Mount Batilamu’s peak. Image by James Dorey/Flinders University nature photographer.This year, researchers described nine new species of bees from the island country of Fiji in the southern Pacific Ocean. These colorful bees in shades of black, golden-green, and metallic, with hints of purple iridescence, are part of the genus Homalictus Cockerell, a group that’s not been taxonomically reviewed in Fiji for 40 years. Many of these bees either have very restricted distributions or are known only from single mountaintops, according to the researchers, and could soon become extinct due to changes in climate and other environmental risks. One new-to-science species, Homalictus terminalis, for example, has only been found on Mount Batilamu, where it seems to be restricted to the top 95 meters (312 feet) of the mountain peak. Another newly described species, H. ostridorsum, has only been recorded on Mount Tomanivi, while H. taveuni is named after the island of Taveuni, the only place it is known from.7. Newly described marmoset species live in part of Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearingA sketch of Mico munduruku. Image by Stephen NashWhen researchers surveying the stretch of Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará, chanced upon a group of three marmosets with white tails, they suspected that it was a potential new-to-science species. White tails are very rare among primates that live in South America; only one other primate species have it. The researchers were right. After studying the monkeys in both the forest and the laboratory, they confirmed that the marmoset, with its distinct white tail, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, was a new species. The marmoset has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós–Jamanxim interfluve. It’s not all good news, though. The Amazon forest that’s home to M. munduruku is being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion, logging, hydroelectric power plants, and gold mining.8. This new-to-science monkey lives in an ‘island’ amid deforestation in BrazilPlecturocebus parecis (left) and the closely related Plecturocebus cinerascens (right). Illustration courtesy of Stephen D. Nash.This year, scientists announced a second, new-to-science species of monkey, also found in the Amazon rainforest. The grey monkeys, named Plecturocebus parecis after the Parecis plateau in Rondônia in Brazil where they are found, were first seen by scientists in 1914. Locally known as the “otôhô,” researchers subsequently saw the monkeys once again in 2011 and confirmed that it was sufficiently distinct from the closely related ashy black titi to be classified as a separate species. The titi monkey’s habitat lies within in the “Arc of Deforestation,” an area of high deforestation where vast swathes of forest have been cleared for cattle ranching and mechanized soy farms. But so far, the monkeys seem to have escaped some of the damage because the steep slopes of the plateau they occupy offer them protection by making the habitat hard to access and unappealing for large-scale deforestation.9. New species of orange-red praying mantis mimics a waspVespamantoida wherleyi. Image by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Praying mantises tend to resemble leaves or tree trunks and come in shades of green and brown. But in 2013, researchers spotted a bright orange-red mantis with a black abdomen in a research station on the banks of the Amazon River in northern Peru. The praying mantis was not only mimicking a wasp’s bright colors, but also a wasp’s movements. Such conspicuous mimicry of wasps is rare among mantises, making this finding exciting, the researchers wrote in a paper published this year. The new-to-science species was named Vespamantoida wherleyi, the genus name Vespamantoida meaning wasp-mantis.10. New species of giant flying squirrel brings hope to one of the world’s ‘most wanted.’The Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel, or Biswamoyopterus gaoligongensis, was recently discovered last year in Yunnan, China, by Quan Li of the Kunming Institute of Zoology and his team. Image by Kadoorie Farm & Botanic Garden.Giant flying squirrels belonging to the group Biswamoyopterus are incredibly rare. The first species described in the genus, the Namdapha flying squirrel (Biswamoyopterus biswasi) from India, has been seen by researchers only once in 1981. Its Laotian relative, the Laotian giant flying squirrel (Biswamoyopterus laoensis), was first spotted by researchers in bushmeat markets of Lao PDR (Laos) in 2012. Both species are known from a single specimen each. This year, scientists in China introduced us to a third species of the genus, Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel (B. gaoligongensis), which they first spotted in the collection of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Thankfully, the team could subsequently observe the animals in the field as well and collect another specimen. Compared to the “lost” Namdapha and Laotian giant flying squirrels, researchers say that Mount Gaoligong flying squirrel’s conservation status looks “slightly optimistic.”11. Newly described pocket shark likely glows in the darkThe only known specimen of the American pocket shark was discovered in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Image by Mark Doosey.The new-to-science American pocket shark (Mollisquama mississippiensis) is the world’s second pocket shark species to be described. Researchers were surveying the eastern Gulf of Mexico to study what sperm whales eat when they collected a large sample of animals from the ocean’s depths. Among the collection was a small shark that the team hadn’t seen before. As it turned out, the animal was a previously undescribed species of pocket shark (the pocket shark gets its names not for its small size but because of small pocket-like openings or glands found behind each of its pectoral fins). This year, the researchers introduced the American pocket shark to us in a new paper, noting that the species has numerous light-producing organs or photophores covering much of the body, which possibly helps the shark glow in the dark depths of the deep sea.12. Newly described tree species from custard apple family is likely endangeredM. iddii grows up to 20 meters in height and bears white flowers. Image by Andrew Marshall.This tree, which grows up to 20 meters (66 feet) in height and bears white flowers, is extremely rare. So far, the newly described species, belonging to the custard apple family of trees, or Annonaceae, is known only from the Usambara mountains of northeastern Tanzania — a few individuals have been observed in the Amani Nature Reserve in the Eastern Usambara Mountains and one in a private reserve in western Usambara. Both reserves are ‘islands’ within a deforested landscape with an extensive clearance of forest in neighboring areas, the researchers write in a paper published this year. Researchers have named it Mischogyne iddii, after Iddi Rajabu, a resident botanist at the Amani Nature Reserve, and they estimate that fewer than 50 individuals of the tree remain in the wild.13. A new species of venomous pit viper was described from IndiaThe Arunachal pit viper camouflages well in leaf litter. Image by Rohan Pandit.In May 2016, wildlife researcher Rohan Pandit and his teammate Wangchu Phiang, a member of the indigenous Bugun tribe living in the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh in India, were surveying Arunachal’s biodiversity when they stumbled upon a snake amid the leaf litter. Pandit knew it was a species of viper, a group of venomous snakes with folding fangs, but it was unlike anything he’d seen before. So he bagged the snake and examined it in detail later, collaborating with other herpetologists to analyze the snake’s morphology and DNA. The team confirmed that the viper was a new-to-science species, and they named it Trimeresurus arunachalensis, or Arunachal pit viper. The new species is closely related to the Tibetan pit viper (Trimeresurus tibetanus), a snake known only from Tibet, but physically and anatomically, the two species are quite distinct, the researchers say.14. New species of leaf-mimicking lizard could already be victim of pet tradeUroplatus finaritra. Image by Mark D. Scherz.The leaf-tailed gecko is a master of camouflage. These lizards, belonging to the genus Uroplatus, are found only in the forests of Madagascar and have body shapes and colors that allow them to merge with dried leaves seamlessly. Researchers described a new-to-science species of a leaf-tailed gecko from Marojejy National Park in northeastern Madagascar this year, and it may already be threatened with extinction because of habitat loss and the illegal pet trade. The new species, named Uroplatus finaritra, has a somewhat compressed body, a small triangular head, and a leaf-shaped tail, and it’s a giant member of Uroplatus. Researchers are concerned that the species may already be a victim of the illegal pet trade since it looks similar to the satanic leaf-tailed gecko, a popular pet worldwide.15. New honeyeater species is known only from Indonesia’s Alor IslandThe Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.This year, scientists described a new bird species that are found only on the island of Alor in eastern Indonesia. Named Myzomela prawiradilagae or Alor myzomela, the red-headed honeyeater is known to inhabit only eucalyptus woodland at elevations above 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) on the island, and researchers worry that its habitat on Alor is already undergoing fragmentation because of the growing human population. While locals have long known of this species, researchers hope that its description as a new species will bring in more awareness about its existence, and ensure that the species does not silently become extinct. Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Insects, Mammals, New Species, Plants, Primates, Rainforests, Reptiles, Sharks, Species Discovery, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade In 2019, Mongabay covered several announcements of new-to-science species.The “discovery” of a new-to-science species is always an awe-inspiring bit of news; the outcome of dogged perseverance, months or years of field surveys, and long periods of sifting through hundreds of museum records.In no particular order, we present our 15 top picks. The discovery of a new-to-science species is always an awe-inspiring bit of news, filling us with hope. This year, researchers introduced us to several such species. Some were the result of a chance encounter; some were cases of researchers revisiting known plants and animals and giving them new identities. But most “discoveries” were the outcome of dogged perseverance, months or years of field surveys, and long periods of sifting through hundreds of museum records.Mongabay covered many of these stories. Below, in no particular order, we present our 15 top picks.1. Amazonian tree with human-sized leaves finally gets ID’d as new speciesCoccoloba gigantifolia leaves can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length. Image courtesy of Rogério Gribel.This is a story of incredible patience. Botanists first encountered individuals of this tree in 1982 while surveying the Madeira River Basin in the Brazilian Amazon. They knew it was a species of Coccoloba, a genus of flowering plants that grows in the tropical forests of the Americas, but they couldn’t pinpoint the species. The individual trees they came across weren’t bearing any flowers or fruits then, parts that are essential to describing a plant species, and the trees’ leaves were too large to dehydrate, press and carry back with them.While the plant, and its massive leaves, became locally famous, it was only in 2005, that the researchers finally collected some seeds and dying flowers from a tree. These materials weren’t good enough to describe the plant species, but the researchers sowed the seeds at the campus of the National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA), grew the seedlings, and waited. Thirteen years later, in 2018, one of the planted trees flourished and fruited, finally giving the researchers the botanical material they needed to describe the new species. The new species, named C. gigantifolia in reference to the plant’s giant leaves, grows to about 15 meters (49 feet) in height and has leaves that can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length, likely the largest known leaf among dicotyledonous plants — a large group of flowering plants that include sunflowers, hibiscus, tomatoes and roses.2. This grouper species collected from an Australian fish market almost became someone’s dinnerQueensland Museum ichthyologist Jeff Johnson with a specimen of Epinephelus fuscomarginatus. Image courtesy of Jeff Johnson.It’s not everyday that you find a previously undescribed species in a fish market, but that’s exactly what Jeff Johnson, an ichthyologist with Australia’s Queensland Museum, did. He had first heard of a mystery grouper 15 years back, and since then, received occasional photographs of the fish, which he thought was a potential new-to-science species. In 2017, when a fisherman sent Johnson a picture of the grouper yet again, Johnson tracked down the market where the fisherman had sold the fish, and bought all five individuals of the fish he found there. Then, together with his colleagues, Johnson analyzed the fish’s DNA, and compared it to those of related species in the museum. Finally, in a new paper published this year, the researchers confirmed that the grouper is indeed new to science, and they named it Epinephelus fuscomarginatus.3. Meet Mini mum, Mini ature, Mini scule: Tiny new frogs from MadagascarAn adult male Mini mum, one of the world’s smallest frogs, rests on a fingernail with room to spare. Image by Andolalao Rakotoarison.This year, herpetologists introduced us to three previously undescribed species of extremely small frogs from Madagascar, aptly named Mini mum, Mini ature, and Mini scule. All of them, just a few millimeters long, belong to Mini, a genus that is also entirely new to science. The new frog species are known from just a handful of locations, and may already be threatened with extinction. Researchers have recorded Mini mum only in Manombo Special Reserve in southeast Madagascar, for example, while Mini scule is known only from the fragmented forests of Sainte Luce Reserve. The areas in which the frogs occur are also likely small, threatened and declining.4. Newly described Chinese giant salamander may be world’s largest amphibianA. sligoi or South China giant salamander painting. Image courtesy of ZSL.For a long time, the Chinese giant salamander, which reaches lengths of more than 5 feet (1.6 meters) and is the world’s largest known living species of amphibian, was considered to be a single species, Andrias davidianus. In the past, some researchers did suspect that the salamander was probably multiple species, but a new study published this year backed the suspicion with evidence. Researchers analyzed samples of the salamander from a series of historical museum specimens to see what local wild populations of the amphibian may have been like before humans started farming the animals and moving them around extensively, and found that the salamander is not just one, but three distinct species. These include A. davidianus, A. sligoi, and a third species that hadn’t been named at the time the study was published. Of the three recognized species, the South China giant salamander (A. sligoi) is most likely the largest, reaching 2 meters (6 feet) in length, the researchers say.5. It took 25 years to describe Indonesia’s newest tarsier Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Any illegal fishing going on around here? Ask an albatross

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Fishing, Law Enforcement, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Monitoring, Overfishing, Research, Saltwater Fish, Wildlife Albatrosses fitted with tiny radar-detecting trackers can help spot fishing vessels that have gone “dark” by turning off their AIS onboard tracking systems, a new study has found.Over a six-month period, 169 wandering and Amsterdam albatrosses fitted with GPS trackers covered more than 47 million square kilometers in the southern Indian Ocean, detecting radar signals from 353 different boats in the process.In international waters, 37% of the boats had no AIS signal, a clue they could be engaged in illegal activity; within countries’ exclusive economic zones, nearly 26% of the boats were without an AIS signal.The findings suggest the seabirds could be deployed to patrol the ocean for vessels operating illegally, complementing a growing body of detection methods. There are plenty of ways to hide in the open ocean if you want to fish unnoticed. Many fishing boats do just that. They turn off their public tracking systems to mask their activities in locations they’re not supposed to be in, such as within marine protected areas or in the waters of a country they aren’t authorized to enter.But researchers have come up with a new way of surveilling these ships: recruiting large albatrosses. Fitted with tiny radar-detecting trackers, the birds can help spot fishing vessels that have gone “dark” by switching off their onboard automatic identification system (AIS). In a six-month pilot study, the birds detected illegal or undeclared boats within both national exclusive economic zones (EEZs) and international waters, across a vast area of the ocean, the researchers report in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“There is wonderful elegance in using birds to monitor fishing vessels, largely because these vessels threaten some bird populations,” David Kroodsma, director of research for the online vessel tracking platform Global Fishing Watch, who was not involved in the study, told Mongabay. “It is great to see teamwork with nature.”A wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans). Image by JJ Harrison via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).All ships weighing 300 gross tons or more are required to carry an AIS, which transmits details via satellite about the ship’s identity, location, direction and speed to stations on the shore, other ships, and aircraft. But AIS signals can go missing. This could be unintentional, as when a ship passes through a region with weak satellite reception. Or a boat’s crew may intentionally turn its AIS system off to conceal its tracks.Most vessel crews leave their marine radars on, though. Radar signals help them detect other ships, maneuver around obstacles, and avoid collisions. But these signals have a small range and are detectable only within a few miles, keeping the vessels largely “dark.”Enter the albatrosses. These large seabirds are attracted to fishing boats, especially ones with bait and offal on offer. It’s this attraction that could make the birds good patrollers of the ocean, or ocean sentinels, the researchers speculated.Henri Weimerskirch, a marine ornithologist at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France, and his colleagues tested out their concept with wandering (Diomedea exulans) and Amsterdam (Diomedea amsterdamensis) albatrosses. Between November 2018 and May 2019, they taped small radar-detecting GPS loggers, which they had developed over three years, on the backs of 169 albatrosses from the islands of Crozet, Kerguelen, and Amsterdam in the southern Indian Ocean.An endangered Amsterdam albatross (Diomedea amsterdamensis) in flight. Image by Vincent Legendre via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).In a previous study, the team had shown that the GPS loggers can pick up radar signals from ships and transmit them to satellites whenever the birds are within five kilometers of the vessels. In the latest study, the team expanded this work to see if birds carrying these loggers could spot fishing vessels without detectable AIS signals. And the albatrosses did.During the six-month period, the birds made multiple foraging trips to the sea, covering an area of more than 47 million square kilometers (18 million square miles) and detecting radar signals from 353 different boats in the process. About 100 of these boats had no AIS signal, suggesting they could be operating illegally. In international waters, 37% of the boats had no AIS signal; within countries’ EEZs, nearly 26% were without an AIS signal. None of the vessels operating around South Africa’s Prince Edward Islands, for example, had an associated AIS signal.“Contrary to what we thought there is a large proportion of boats without AIS in EEZs and therefore a large proportion of illegal boats,” said Alexandre Corbeau, a doctoral student at CNRS and a co-author of the study. “Outside the EEZs we knew that there would be a higher proportion of undeclared vessels but this is the first time that we have a real estimate that shows the importance of undeclared fishing in the South Indian Ocean.”How many of the fishing vessels without AIS in the study were operating illegally needs to be confirmed.One constraint on deploying armadas of albatross spies is that the extent of the ocean the birds can patrol is limited by the area they forage and live in. How frequently the birds patrol the same area also remains to be seen.“Each bird can only ‘see’ an area that is a few tens of kilometers across at any given moment, and the ocean is thousands of times larger than that, meaning the birds can only monitor a small part of the ocean at one given moment,” Kroodsma said. “I think that means that you will get lots of snapshots of where vessels are, but you might not track every vessel, and you likely can’t track many vessels over time.”There are other technologies that can monitor the presence of dark ships. These include satellites equipped with optical sensors that can snap high-resolution images on low-cloud-cover days, or with synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) sensors that can see through clouds. But these, too, provide only snapshots and are limited to when the satellites are overhead and turned on, Kroodsma said.The value of having a variety of technologies, he added, is the potential to combine them together to get a complete picture of what vessels are doing on the ocean.A wandering albatross on Prion Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Image by Andrew Shiva via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).The tagged albatrosses can also help pinpoint areas where the seabirds interact with fisheries. This is important, the researchers said, because 15 of the 22 albatross species are threatened, including the two used in the study, and hundreds of thousands of these birds are estimated to drown each year when they get caught on the baited hooks of fishing gear. The study found some patterns: only 10% of the birds did not encounter a fishing vessel while out foraging; adult albatrosses were more likely to fly closer to fishing vessels than younger birds; and wandering albatrosses approached fishing boats more frequently than Amsterdam albatrosses.Could the use of loggers put the threatened albatrosses at greater risk? The researchers say that’s unlikely. The loggers weigh between 55 and 65 grams (1.9 and 2.3 ounces), less than 1% of the birds’ body weight. “This is much less than the recommended 3%,” Corbeau said.The loggers are also difficult to spot with the naked eye because they’re attached on the birds’ backs with plumage-colored tape, he added. So fishers would have a hard time identifying tagged birds.“The beacons transmit the information 5 kilometers [3 miles] from the boat, so long before the birds are visible from the boat,” he said. “It should also be noted that hundreds of birds are permanently behind the boats and therefore locating an albatross equipped is very difficult.”A wandering albatross chick on its nest on Possession Island in the Crozet archipelago of the southern Indian Ocean. The species is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. Image by Alain Ricci via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Shreya Dasgupta is an independent science writer based in Bangalore, India. Follow her on Twitter @ShreyaDasgupta.Citation:Weimerskirch, H., Collet, J., Corbeau, A., Pajot, A., Hoarau, F., Marteau, C., … Patrick, S. C. (2020). Ocean sentinel albatrosses locate illegal vessels and provide the first estimate of the extent of nondeclared fishing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201915499. doi:10.1073/pnas.1915499117 Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Half-time: QPR 0 Southampton 0

first_imgChris Ramsey fielded a side full of attacking intent but Southampton looked more dangerous in the first half and went close when Graziano Pelle hit the woodwork. Ramsey, in caretaker charge following the departure of manager Harry Redknapp, included Adel Taarabt in QPR’s starting line-up, while Matt Phillips and Armand Traore were deployed on the flanks and Leroy Fer was moved into central midfield alongside Joey Barton.However, Rangers’ Rob Green was the busier keeper early on, gathering an effort from Pelle and seeing a shot from Eljero Elia drift wide after Green had been spotted off his line.Victor Wanyama and the impressive Sadio Mane also fired wide, while at the other end Barton shot over following good work from Taarabt.Southampton were dealt a blow when young defender Matt Targett was stretchered off midway through the first half following a clash of heads with Phillips.But they continued to have the upper hand and Mane was denied by a fingertip save by Green after squirming away from Clint Hill.Pelle was then unlucky not to open the scoring when he volleyed James Ward-Prowse’s right-wing corner against the bar. QPR: Green; Onuoha, Caulker, Dunne, Hill, Phillips, Barton, Fer, Traore, Taarabt, Austin.Subs: McCarthy, Isla, Kranjcar, Henry, Vargas, Zarate, Zamora.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Aldon Smith, arrested for DUI in June, celebrates 30th birthday on Instagram

first_imgThis just in: Aldon Smith has declared “Happy birthday to me.”Smith turned 30 on Wednesday and celebrated with the Instagram post above. He has a right to be proud of himself if indeed we can take the words in his post to heart.That would …last_img